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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

AWDOVMinLE 



1997 




ANNUAL REPORT 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto1997ando 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



1997 ANNUAL REPORT 




^111111%^ 



PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER 

PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, 

SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND 

ARTICLE II, SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF 

THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



COVER PHOTO TAKEN IN ELM SQUARE 
COURTESY OF ANDOVER RESIDENT & 
PHOTOGRAPHER ROBERT A. DENNIS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Animal Inspection 58 

Board of Selectmen 3 

Community Dev. & Planning 15 

Building Division 15 

Conservation Division 22 

Electrical Inspection 15 

Health Division 24 

Planning Division 28 

Plumbing & Gas Inspection 16 

Zoning Board of Appeals 30 

Community Services 74 

Directory of Town Officials 161 

Directory of Dept./Div. Heads 165 

Division of Elder Services 65 

Finance & Budget 5 

Assessors 5 

Central Purchasing 6 

Collector/Treasurer 7 

Information Systems 7 

Veterans Services 8 

Financial Statements 98 

Fire Department 59 

Gr. Lawrence Technical High School 89 

Housing Authority 90 

How to Reach Elected Officials 169 

How Can We Help You? 166 

John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund 94 

Margaret G. Towle Fund 94 

Memorial Hall Library 62 



Plant and Facilities Department 40 

Building Maintenance & Electrical/Mechanical . . 40 

Forestry 41 

Municipal Buildings 42 

Parks & Grounds 41 

Spring Grove Cemetery 41 

Vehicle Maintenance 41 

Police Department 50 

Animal Control 53 

Detective Division 51 

Emergency Management 53 

Operations Division 50 

Records Division 51 

Preservation Commission 91 

Public Works Department 32 

Engineering 32 

Gr. Lawrence Sanitary District 35 

Highway 33 

Sewer 34 

Solid Waste 35 

Water 34 

School Building Committee 88 

School Department 77 

Town Clerk 72 

Town Counsel 14 

Town Manager 1 

Town Meeting Minutes 114 

Tr. Punchard Free School 95 

We Would Like To Hear From You 170 



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VISION STATEMENT 

The Town ofAndover, more than a place to live, is a way of life. Its legacy of 
democracy shall be preserved. Each citizen should experience the treasures of 
nature, history, individual respect, neighborhood, and learning. As resources and 
energy allow, each of these gifts from the past will be enriched in the present for those 
yet to be. 



Andover Board of Selectmen 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, ma o 1 8 1 o To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Andover: 

(508) 623-8200 

The year 1997 offered a number of surprises for Andover. The first was a surprise snowstorm on 
the evening of March 30th and during the day of April 1* which resulted in over 23 inches of snow and 
came as an April Fool's present to all of us who were preparing for Spring. We had a number of surprises 
from long-time Town employees when Richard E. Neal, Superintendent of Schools, James F. Johnson, 
Chief of Police and Gerald H. Silverman, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, all announced their intention 
to retire next year. James M. Barenboim, Chairman and member of the Board of Selectmen for nine years, 
announced that he would retire from the Board and not seek re-election in the 1997 Town Election. 

The Town welcomed new Selectmen Brian P. Major for a three-year term to replace James M. 
Barenboim and John P. Hess for a one-year term to fill the vacancy left by Barry R. Finegold who was 
elected as a State Representative. 

The official business of the Town was conducted at the Annual Town Meeting in April in Andover 
High School's new field house. On the first night, 1,225 voters inaugurated the field house for Town 
Meeting use. The voters approved a budget of S78.4M which allowed an excess levy capacity of $868, 1 00. 
This is noteworthy because this is the third year that the Town has not taxed to the maximum of the levy 
limit. Along with that, in December, the Board of Selectmen voted to classify the tax rate and reduce the 
split between residential and commercial/industrial and personal property taxes by 1.5%. The previous shift 
was 33% and the Board voted to reduce it to 31.5%. 

On the development front, the Town experienced steady residential growth with 78 new single 
family home building permits issued. On the industrial and office building front there was considerable 
growth. The Planning Board, during 1997, permitted over 1.5 million square feet of office space. Most 
of this was in the 1-93 and River Road area. Also, an example of a positive building re-use is Putnam 
Investment's renovation of the former GCA building on Shattuck Road. The GCA facility is 345,000 
square feet and it was vacant for several years. Putnam remodeled the building and opened it as a customer 
service center in early 1997. 

Schools were a high priority for the Town government during the year. The Department of Plant 
and Facilities worked extensively on two schools - the Bancroft Elementary School and West Elementary 
School. At the Bancroft Elementary School, the Town worked to address the air quality and overcrowding 
issues. The air quality issues were addressed by a thorough cleaning of the facility and improvements to 
the HVAC system. The overcrowding was addressed by the installation of four modular classrooms. At 
the West Elementary School, pods A and B, built twenty years ago along the open classroom concept 
design, were converted into twenty classrooms complete with walls, drop ceilings, HVAC, electrical 
systems, etc. 



The Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Andover 
Page Two 



The Council on Aging was the recipient of the 1997 Veronica B. Smith Award for Excellence in 
Services and Programs. The Andover Senior Center was commended for their successfully innovative 
programs which reach in all directions from the cultural to the educational to the intergenerational to service 
the needs of our growing senior population. 

Three projects in the planning stages consumed a considerable amount of the Town Manager's time 
during the year: the School Department's proposed Middle School, a Police and Fire Station 
addition/renovation, and a new Senior Citizens Center. Architectural Resources Cambridge, Inc. was hired 
to prepare the preliminary plans and specifications for the proposed Middle School, grades 5-8. By year 
end the architects were well on the way defining the preliminary plan. Late in 1 997, Request for Proposals 
were issued for architectural and engineering services for preliminary plans and specifications for the Police 
Station addition and renovation project and for the new Senior Citizen project. 

The completion of the Andover High School addition and renovation project was the number one 
priority for the Town Manager all year long. It required day-by-day attention to the progress of 
construction. School opened successfully in September and by the end of 1997, Phases 4 A, 5 and 6 were 
completed which resulted in 17 newly renovated classrooms and the Media Center being complete. The 
only thing left in 1998 was the remaining Phase 4B which included 10 classrooms and those were to be 
completed in March of 1998. The Town Manager's Office and Department of Plant and Facilities put in 
considerable time and resources to ensure that the construction at the high school was conducted safely. 
There was several incidents late in 1 996 and early in 1 997 that raised questions about the contractor' s safety 
practices and the Town reacted by placing additional personnel at the school to ensure the safety of the 
students and faculty in the occupied area and to ensure safe construction practices in the construction areas. 
The additional personnel went into place in February and proved to be very successful in reducing the 
downtime and inconveniences in the occupied areas. 

A number of long-time Town employees retired during 1997: James Brightney, Director of 
Municipal Maintenance - nineteen years of service; James Downey, DPW employee - 34 years of service; 
Maywood Kenney, DMM Secretary - 26 years of service; Evelyn Kou, Assistant Director, Memorial Hall 
Library - 22 years of service; Calvin Metcalf, Police Officer - 34 years of service; Joseph Ouellette, Police 
Officer - 26 years of service and George Miller, Police Sergeant - 32 years of service. 

The Town of Andover, which is known for lively debate and community spirit, welcomes your 
participation at the upcoming Annual Town Election on March 24 th and at the Annual Town Meeting on 
April 27 th , 28* and 29*. I encourage you to do your part to keep Andover vital, dynamic and challenged 
by participating in these civic events and lending your voice to the citizens democracy that makes Andover 
such a wonderful place to live. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Leginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER, ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 

2 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, MA 01810 
(508) 623-8200 



Dear Citizens of Andover: 



Rather than just an Annual Report for 1997, 1 would like to look back on the eighteen years 
that you have allowed me to serve you as a Selectman. 

The first meetings I attended were in the Memorial Hall Library and then, later, we moved 
to the third floor of what is now the Town House. 

My first major vote as an official in 1980 concerned gravel removal and now, in 1998, we 
have two warrant articles dealing with the same thing. Evidently nothing seems to change in 
government! 

Cable television arrived in Andover in 1982 after two years of study and we are now in a new 
contract with our fourth or fifth company. The companies changed - we didn't. With the new 
programming and equipment, we have provided the Town and School buildings with state-of-the art 
technology including on-line services and communication connections for the future. 

Having served the Town as Chairman of the Declining Enrollment Committee in the mid-70's, 
I had "tongue-in-cheek" talking about renovating the East Junior High School into a Town Office 
Building. As we are now aware, that became a reality in 1984. The Memorial Hall Library addition 
also occurred in the late 80's, along with the restoration of the Town House. We have added to our 
schools both in the 80's and 90's as the population of the Town increased causing school enrollments 
to rise. 

The Robert E. McQuade Water Treatment Plant was built to provide Andover with a water 
program and to plan well into the 21 rt Century giving us the finest water available in the country. 

The economic upturn that began in the early 90's has brought industrial development faster 
than we ever thought possible. This has helped Andover with its many building and development 
projects and will do so as the growth continues. 

My only regret is that I have not been able to put a shovel in the ground to begin building a 
new Senior Center. That will probably happen shortly. 



Citizens of Andover 
Page Two 



I would really like to thank the citizens for the opportunity to serve as a Selectman for all of 
these years. I never imagined when I left the Andover School System in 1974 that this opportunity 
would happen. I have worked with three Town Managers who all dedicated their time and effort to 
make Andover a better place to live. I joined a Board of outstanding people in March of 1980 - Jim 
Abramson, Col. Ed Harris, Norma Gammon and Susan (Poore) Dalton and all of those who replaced 
them have given the same wonderful service to the Town. Norma and Susan continue to serve the 
community in other ways long after leaving the Board. A special thanks to my friend Charlie Wesson 
who served with me for thirteen years. 

I would be remiss if I didn't thank the hundreds of Town employees that I have shared many 
hours with during this period. We are extremely fortunate in our community for their dedication to 
Andover. 

The Town would not be able to function without volunteers serving on its numerous 
committees and boards. If residents did not contribute their time as committee members by serving 
on the Finance Committee, Zoning Board of Appeals, Planning Board, etc., Andover would not be 
the place to live in Massachusetts 

I really believe the Selectmen's Vision Statement - "The Town of Andover, more than a place 
to live, is a way of life. " 

Sincerely, 



Gerald H. Silverman, Chairman 
Andover Board of Selectmen 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER. ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 

4 



FINANCE & BUDGET DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Finance Department is to build and reinforce confidence in Town 
financial management by managing and planning all financial functions in an efficient, cost 
effective and responsive manner, and, through a collaboration of team efforts, provide departments 
and the public with the necessary information to assure accuracy, accountability and justification. 

FINANCE ADMINISTRATION 

The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 1998 Budget was released on January 17, 
1997. During the months of January, February, and March, approximately twenty meetings were 
held with the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and department heads to review the budget 
and warrant article requests and prepare recommendations for the Annual Town Meeting. 

On April 4, 1997 the Finance Committee Report was mailed to 1 1,600 households. The 
Annual Town Meeting was held on April 14, 1997 and the Fiscal Year 1998 operating budget 
(Article 4) was adopted in the amount of $75,305,961 . This budget was an increase of 7% from the 
fiscal year 1997 operating budget of $70,398,733. 

The Andover Cable Advisory Committee completed its negotiations for the cable television 
license renewal in June, 1997. Continental Cablevision merged with U.S. West and U.S. West 
subsequently changed its name to Media One. Media One will provide state of the art technology 
services to the residents of Andover, including cable television as well as Media One Express, an 
Internet service. Some of the highlights resulting from the agreement with Media One include: 

upgrade in Education and Public Access Television Studio at Andover High School. 
Media One assumed the responsibility and associated costs for the broadcasting of public 
meetings. 

• Media One has rewired and installed cameras and remote control accessories in the Board of 
Selectmen's conference room and the School Committee conference room. 

Media One has rewired all schools for cable and Internet access, including the provision of 
free Internet access for all schools and Memorial Hall Library. 

• Media One has constructed a dedicated network connecting all school and municipal buildings 
for free highspeed data and video communications. 

In October, the Town Manager released the FY1999-FY2003 Capital Improvement Program. 
This five year program totaled approximately $74. 6M in projects of which $1 8M was recommended 
for FY 1999. 

ASSESSOR 

The Board of Assessors is responsible for the valuation of all real estate and personal property 
items in the Town. The Board hears appeals in these two categories along with motor vehicle excise. 
The Assessors are also responsible for the awarding of nearly 350 property tax exemptions on an 
annual basis. Major exemption groups include senior citizens, disabled veterans, widows and 
widowers, and individuals classified as blind. 



The Board of Assessors also conducts revaluations of all property on a triennial (every three 
years) basis. The Board is responsible for meeting all Massachusetts Department of Revenue 
guidelines for property valuations, reporting of valuations and tax billing. 

The Assessor's Division gathers vast amounts of property and ownership related information 
that is available to the general public. More than 1,000 requests for public records and information 
are received and processed on an annual basis. Some of the highlights for 1997 are as follows: 

The installation of a new Windows based assessment system will begin on April 1". The 
system will provide better desktop access for the staff and the public. 
• The Board of Assessors worked through the year to successfully reduce the number of 

Appellate Tax Board cases from over 100 appeals to less than thirty appeals. 
In conjunction with the Tax Collector's Office, the Board of Assessors worked to settle 
outstanding tax delinquencies through repayment plans or petitions to remove uncollectable 
taxes from the rolls. 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 

In 1 997 the Central Purchasing Division processed approximately 2,4 1 7 purchase orders and 
5,712 requests for payments for the Town, and 3,644 purchase orders for the School Department. 
During this period there were approximately 46 bids and nine requests for proposals which were 
advertised and officially opened. The continued utilization of the State bids and contracts available 
to cities and towns has provided numerous benefits to the taxpayers of Andover. 

At the end of the year, John W. Aulson, Purchasing Agent for the past nineteen years, retired. 
Elaine M. Shola was promoted to this position of Purchasing Agent/Insurance Coordinator for the 
Town and School Departments. 

Throughout 1997 Andover has initiated a number of Cooperative Bids as well as participated 
in a number of these bids with other communities. Under Massachusetts General Laws, two or more 
political subdivisions may jointly purchase goods or services through the bidding process. Some of 
the items purchased were: paper products for copy machines, police vehicles, road salt, chemicals, 
fuel oils, vehicle fuels and office supplies. 

Some of the major request for proposals and bids solicited in 1997 were: 

Burner Replacement at Bancroft School 

Highway Rock Salt, Solar Salt and Liquid Calcium Chloride 32% 

Replacement of Fuel Oil Tank and Vault Modifications at the Water Treatment Plant 

Outdoor Lighting for Recreational Facilities 

Rescue Hovercraft and Trailer 

Miscellaneous Road Materials 

Athletic Equipment 

Cafeteria Paper Products 

Replacement of Unit Ventilators at Bancroft school 

Fire Curtains for Doherty Middle School 



Drywall Partitions for West Elementary School 

Portable Air Compressors 

Aerial Ladder/Platform Truck for Fire Department 

Drainage Construction 

Water Mains for Ballardvale 

Office Supplies, Equipment and Furniture 

Steel Beam Guard Rails for Various Locations 

Purchase and/or Lease of Portable Modular Classrooms 

The Lease of One Vehicle for Elder Services 

Facilities Study/Site Selection for Location of a New Senior Center Building 

Facilities Study/Site Selection for Location of a New Public Safety Building 

Consulting Services to assist in the Selection of a Police Chief 

The Office of Central Purchasing is also responsible for administering the contract compliance 
of Andover's Affirmative Action Plan, as well as the insurance coordination and risk management for 
all Town and School Departments. The health and personal insurance however, is handled by the 
Human Resources Department. Central Purchasing has handled numerous casualty and property 
claims over the year. Approximately 24 claims have resulted in $193,445. 17 being recovered for the 
Town. 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 

The Collector/Treasurer's Division is responsible for the collection, investment and 
disbursement of all Town monies. Some of the highlights for 1997 are as follows: 

Installed new parking ticket system that will increase efficiency and reduce costs. 

• Successfully processed over 50,000 real estate and personal property bills and payments as 
well as 30,000 excise tax bills and payments. 

Borrowed 4.2 million dollars at the extremely low rate of 4.61%. 

• Helped to maintain Andover's high bond rating of Aal. 
Invested Town funds to maximize interest income. 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The Information Systems Division is responsible for hardware, software and computerized 
data used in municipal operations including financial records, word processing documents, electronic 
transmission and other varied electronic files. This division supports all users of the network and 
strives to meet the many diversified needs of town government. Highlights for 1997 include: 

upgraded the centralized financial application server which substantially increased the 

performance of software and will greatly facilitate FY2000 compliance. 

rewired Town Offices building, and coordinated the rewiring of the School Administration 

wing for networking purposes. 

implemented a local area network in Town Offices which allows users to access both PC 

based applications and centralized financial applications. 

improved access to office automation software, file sharing and e-mail. 

converted many reporting obligations to be electronically transmitted to increase efficiency 



and timeliness. 

upgraded PC hardware and software to run Windows95. 

provided over 1 00 PC training slots to employees (Windows, word processing, spreadsheet, 

database). 

VETERANS SERVICES 

The Veterans Services Division is responsible for providing assistance to veterans and their 
families. Nine families were assisted with funds to help pay for fuel, food, medical and personal 
needs. The Town is reimbursed for 75% of these expenditures by the State according to Chapter 115 
of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

Eleven veterans were admitted to Veterans Administration hospitals. Forty-two veterans died 
in 1997; thirty-five from World War II, three from the Korean War, and four from the Vietnam War. 
One of the highlights for 1997 was that the Harding Street Bridge was dedicated to Andover's 
Persian Gulf War veterans. 




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10 



TAX RATE RECAPITULATION 


BUDGET 


BUDGET 


BUDGET 


BUDGET 




FY1995 


FY1996 


FY1997 


FY1998 


EXPENDITURES 










Appropriations & Articles 


62,335,008 


66,410,333 


71,609,767 


75,772,606 


Other Local Expenditures: 










Tax Title Purposes 


20,000 


40,000 


40,000 


40,000 


Final Court Judgements 





40,492 


115,000 





Overlay/ Other Deficits 


653,461 


543,401 


1,135,896 


588,013 


Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 


70,350 


66,663 


68,758 


64,552 


Total Local Expenditures 


743,811 


690,556 


1,359,654 


692,565 


State and County Charges 


1,093,634 


1,059,262 


999,101 


1,020,557 


Overlay Reserve for Abatements 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 
EST. RECEIPTS & OTHER REVENUE 


721,215 


735,201 


819,112 


926,191 


64,893,668 


68,895,352 


74,787,634 


78,411,919 










Estimated Receipts from State: 










Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 


4,068,046 


4,651,052 


5,713,130 


7,794,113 


Cherry Sheet Estimated Charges 


27,557 


63,099 


39,631 


5,837 


Total from State 


4,095,603 


4,714,151 


5,752,761 


7,799,950 


Estimated Local Receipts: 










Local Estimated Receipts 


11,520,500 


4,733,000 


5,032,000 


5,945,000 


Offset Receipts 


570,220 


634,163 


699,000 


980,451 


Enterprise Funds 




7,357,947 


7,653,620 


7,726,937 


Revolving Funds (53e 1/2) 




345,000 


400,000 





Total Local Receipts 


12,090,720 


13,070,110 


13,784,620 


14,652,388 


Free Cash and Other Revenue: 










Free Cash - Articles 


54,300 


180,000 


715,834 


465,645 


Other Available Funds 


397,909 


346,683 


369,133 


233,732 


Revenue Sharing 










Total Other Appropriations 


452,209 


526,683 


1,084,967 


699,377 


Free Cash - Operating Budget 


300,000 


300,000 


1,500,000 


300,000 


Total Estimated Receipts 


16,938,532 


18,610,944 


22,122,348 


23,451,715 


Total Property Taxes 

TOTAL REVENUES 


47,955,136 


50,284,408 


52,665,286 


54,960,204 


64,893,668 


68,895,352 


74,787,634 


78,411,919 



TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 

RESIDENTIAL TAX RATE 

COMM, IND, PER PROP TAX RATE 

EQUALIZED TAX RATE 


FY1995 


FY1996 


FY1997 FY1998 


2,676,333 

16.06 
24.19 
17.92 


2,777,252 

16.41 
23.99 
18.11 


3,091,930 

15.48 
2257 
17.03 


3,156,121 ; 

15.82 
22.90 
17.41 



11 



WATER AND SEWER ANNUAL REPORT 

DEBT SERVICE —FY 1997 

SEWER 

ART 21, 1984 PUMPING STATION 

and 

ART 26, 1985 LOWELL STREET(Advance Refundi 

ART 21, 1984 PUMPING STATION 

and 

ART 26, 1985 LOWELL STREET(Advance Refunding) 

ART 18, 1985 SANITARY SEWER 

ART 28, 1989 SANITARY SEWER(Advance Refun 

ART 28, 1989 SANITARY SEWER(Advance Refunding) 

ART 33, 1989 NORTH STREET 

ART 41 , 1 991 NORTH STREET 

TOTAL 



PRINCIPAL 



210,000.00 



34,000.00 
60,350.00 

5,000.00 
30,000.00 



INTEREST 



7,035.00 



99,820.00 
7,650.00 
16,726.90 
16,973.00 
465.00 
10,190.00 



339.350.00 



158,859.90 



WATER 

ART 52, 1983 WATER BONDS 



ART 37 
ART 1A, 
ART 1A : 
ART 1A, 
ART 37 
ART 46 
ART 53 
ART1A 
ART 46 
ART 53 
ART 1A 
ART 15 
ART1A 
ART1A 
ART 37 
ART 46 
ART 53 
ART 32 
ART 33 
ART 31 
ART 46 
ART 46 
ART 32 
ART 46 
TOTAL 



1987 WATER MAINS 
1987 TREATMENT PLANT 
1987 TREATMENT PLANT(Advance Refu 
1987 TREATMENT PLANT(Advance Refu 
1987 WATER MAINS 
1992 WATER MAINS 
1992 PUMPING STATION 
1997 TREATMENT PLANT 
1992 WATER MAINS 
1992 BANCROFT PUMPING STATION 
1987 TREATMENT PLANT(Advance Refunding) 
16, 1985 MAINS & STATION 
1987 TREATMENT PLANT(Advance Refunding) 
1987 TREATMENT PLANT(Advance Refunding) 
1987 WATER MAINS 
1992 WATER MAINS 

1994 WATER MAINS 

1995 WATER PLANT IMPROVEMENTS 
1995 WATER MAINS 

1995 FISH BROOK IMPROVEMENTS 

1992 WATER MAINS 

1993 PUMPING STATION REPAIR 
1995 WATER TREATMENT PLANT 
1992 WATER MAINS 



100,000.00 
20,000.00 

155,000.00 

232,500.00 
54,250.00 
35,000.00 

180,000.00 
50,000.00 
10,000.00 
40,000.00 
65,000.00 

285,000.00 



40,000.00 
12,000.00 
40,000.00 
50,000.00 
55,000.00 
25,000.00 
15,000.00 
10,000.00 



12,375.00 

3,240.00 
25,110.00 
52,312.50 
15,045.33 
14,510.00 
66,715.00 
18,882.50 

1,725.00 

12,985.00 

14,665.00 

111,355.00 

9,547.50 
89,111.00 
23,401.00 
49,993.00 
16,725.26 

7,700.00 
22,812.50 
53,088.75 
17,768.75 

9,388.75 

7,107.50 
12,875.00 

6,242.50 



1,473,750.00 



674,681.84 



12 



WATER AND SEWER ENTERPRISE FUNDS 



Statement of Revenues, Expense and Changes in Fund Balance 



Water Enterprise 



Sewer Enterprise 



OPERATING REVENUES 

Charges for Services 

OPERATING EXPENSES 

Cost of Services and Administration 

Debt Service 

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES 



$5,236,021 



2,180,459 
2.129.314 
4,309,773 



$2,132,939 



1,324,207 

498.210 

1,822,417 



OPERATING INCOME (LOSS) 

NONOPERATING REVENUES 

Investment Income 

NET INCOME BEFORE TRANSFERS 

TRANSFERS 
Operating Transfers Out 

NET INCOME 



926,248 

29,493 
955,741 

(918,533) 
37,208 



310,522 



310,522 

(195,066) 
115,456 



RETAINED EARNINGS/FUND BALANCES 
Beginning of Fiscal Year 

RETAINED EARNINGS/FUND BALANCES 

End of Fiscal Year 



$572,332 



$609,540 



$7,298 



$122,754 



From Town of Andover Annual Audit Report for Fiscal Year ending June 30, 1997 (Powers and Sullivan, CPA) 



13 



TOWN COUNSEL 

During 1997, Town Counsel had conferences with various Town officials on almost a daily 
basis. Town Counsel also reviewed all Articles of the Warrant and attended all Town Meetings. 
During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed and numerous deeds, 
easements, releases and agreements were drafted and recorded. 

Town Counsel also made numerous appearances before State Courts and Administrative 
Boards. Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town officials. Court challenges 
to decisions by the Town's boards and commissions were defended by Town Counsel. 

During the year extensive work was done for the acquisition from multiple land owners of real 
property necessary for the planned expansion and improvement of River Road. 

Special legislation authorized by Town Meeting for the removal of the office of Police Chief 
from Civil Service was drafted and submitted to the Legislature. 



14 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 

BUILDING DIVISION 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of the State Building Code 780 CMR 
of the Acts of 1972, and Chapter 40 A The Zoning Act, Massachusetts General Laws and all other 
applicable laws and regulations including applicable Sections of the Andover Code (Demolition 
Bylaw, The Ballard Vale Historic District Bylaw and the Chimney Cap Bylaw). The Building 
Division issues permits for all types of construction including, but not limited to, school buildings 
(both public and private), institutional buildings (nursing homes, nursery schools), business, 
commercial and industrial buildings, dormitories, multi-family as well as single family dwelling, pools, 
chimneys, signs and additions and alterations to all structures. The Building Officials also perform 
periodic inspections for those buildings which are required to obtain Certificates of Inspection under 
State Building Code, Section 108. 

In addition to scheduled inspections and meetings with internal and external customers, the 
Building Division was represented at three (3) State Building Code Appeals Board Hearings, forty-six 
(46) Interdepartmental Reviews, and held thirty-eight (38) Plan Reviews. 

TYPE OF PERMITS 

Single Family Dwellings 
(including foundations) 

New Commercial Construction 

Additions and Alterations 
to All Types of Buildings 

Public Buildings/Schools 

Pools, Chimneys, Raze, Signs, etc. 

Certificates of Inspection 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Zoning Verifications 

TOTAL 

♦Includes Water Connection Fees 

ELECTRICAL 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the practical safeguarding of persons and 
property from hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is responsible for 
receiving and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis, inspecting all residential, 



15 



NO. OF PERMITS 


ESTIMATED VALUES 


FEES 


78 


$15,184,444 


$160,210* 


8 


35,975,600 


247,514 


866 


32,085,908 


204,005 


42 


5,810,681 


35,307 


142 


649,374 


8,140 


21 





974 


21 





2,300 
144 


1,178 


$89,706,007 


$658,594 



commercial and industrial jobs, approving electrical plans for new buildings, assisting the Fire 
Department in inspections of fires due to faulty electrical devices and seeing that permits are issued 
for repairs due to fire damage. 

Enforcement of fire alarm regulations for new homes, conducting and certifying inspections 
of schools, public buildings, day care centers and nursing homes in conjunction with the building 
officials are part of the duties of the Electrical Inspector. Numerous electrical violations were 
investigated with the cooperation ofMassachusetts Electric Company and corrected without incident. 

1996 1997 

ELECTRICAL PERMITS 1,118 1,137 

ELECTRICAL PERMIT FEES $76,975.25 $78,285.06 



PLUMBING AND GAS FITTING 

All plumbing and gas fitting installations are controlled through enforcement of the 
Commonwealth ofMassachusetts State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code, formulated by the Board 
of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 142. 

The Plumbing and Gas Inspector issues permits for installation of gas piping, plumbing and 
sewer installations and repairs. Inspections are conducted as necessary to ensure compliance with 
State Codes. A Final Inspection is conducted for the purpose of issuance of Certificate of 
Occupancy. Complaints and violations are also investigated and corrected or reported to the proper 
authorities. 

1996 1997 

PLUMBING PERMITS 
PLUMBING PERMIT FEES 
GAS FITTING PERMITS 
GAS FITTING PERMIT FEES 



648 


767 


$32,181 


$38,707 


544 


510 


$13,810 


$14,706 



16 



BUILDING DIVISION 



Single Family Dwellings 



Number of Permits 



Estimated Value 



100 




15,000,000 



10,000,000 



5,000,000 



1994 1995 1996 1997 




1981 1994 1995 1996 1997 



New Commercial Construction 



Estimated Value 



35.000,000 
30,000,000 
25,000,000 
20,000,000 
15,000,000 
10,000,000 
5,000,000 




Number of Permits 





1984 1995 1996 1997 



1994 



1995 



1996 1997 



17 



BUILDING DIVISION 



Additions and Alterations 



Estimated Value 



35,000,000 
30,000,000 
25.000.000 
20.000,000 
15,000,000 
10.000.000 
5.000.000 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



Number of Permits 



1200 



1000 



800 



600 



400 



200 




1994 



1995 



1996 



1997 



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H 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 

The mission of the Conservation Commission is to protect Andover s natural resources and 
to act as trustees in perpetuity of the Town 's conservation land 

During 1 997 the Conservation Commission issued 25% more permits under the Massachusetts 
Wetlands Act than the preceding year. An advertised Public Hearing is conducted for each permit 
issued as required by State law. These projects include commercial, industrial, residential 
subdivisions, single lot development, municipal and State projects. While virtually all new Orders of 
Conditions and Amended Orders of Conditions were issued on time, an estimated twenty percent of 
all new Determinations of Applicability failed to meet the time periods set forth in the Massachusetts 
Wetlands Protection Act. 

The Conservation Commission added 60 acres of conservation land (totaling approximately 
1 ,660 acres) and accepted one Conservation Restriction. In December the Conservation Commission 
purchased a 28.242 acre parcel at Ballard Vale and Arcadia Roads with the concurrent gift of 1 9.682 
acres at Sunset Rock Road from Noel Realty Trust. Noel Realty Trust donated a further 12.3 1 acre 
parcel at 254 Beacon Street. A Conservation Restriction over a portion of 56 Central Street was 
donated by Ms. Ila S. Cox. 

Open Space and Recreation Plan . The Open Space and Recreation Plan and an Open Space 
Map were completed. The plan will be submitted in 1998 to the Executive Office of Environmental 
Affairs for review and approval. 

Wetland Bylaw . Legal and technical consultants were retained to develop a draft Bylaw and 
Regulations. The Andover Wetland Bylaw has been submitted as a Warrant Article for the 1998 
Annual Town Meeting. 

Rivers Protection Act Amendments to the Wetlands Protection Act . This new legislation 
took effect August 7, 1996. These changes were incorporated into the Massachusetts Wetlands 
Protection Regulations in October 1997. 

1994 1995 1996 1997 

Conservation Commission Meetings 

Public Hearings & Public Meetings 

Orders of Conditions Issued 

Amended Orders of Conditions Issued 

Certificates of Compliance Issued 

Determinations of Applicability Issued 

Notification of Satisfactory Completion of Work 

Findings of Significance Issued 

Enforcement Orders Issued 

Emergency Certifications 

Acres of Conservation Land Acquired 

Conservation Restrictions Established 

Wetland Filing Fees Collected 

Expenditures from Conservation Fund 

(by Fiscal Year) 

22 



22 


23 


23 


24 


164 


182 


270 


339 


21 


14 


33 


30 


9 


9 


11 


6 


50 


36 


40 


36 


62 


81 


123 


168 






11 


21 


23 


30 


28 


34 


14 


11 


7 


8 


3 


7 


2 


4 


10.65 


10.62 


3.0 


60 





1 





1 


$6,922 


$8,800 


$11,090 


$13,217 


$264,701 


$92,005 


$86,000 


$1,360,000 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 



Det. of Applicability 



200- 



150- 



100- 



50 



btt: 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



Acres Acquired 



so 



3b 



40 



30 



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10 






las* 1365 1536 1&&T 



Orders of Condition 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



23 



HEALTH DIVISION 

The mission of the Andover Board of Health is to promote and protect the public health 
including the physical, mental, emotional and social wellness of all the people. 

The Health Division encompasses all phases of health administration, including planning, 
evaluation, budgeting, enforcement, inspection and pseudo adjudicatory proceedings. The Sanitarians 
supervise the inspection and public health education programs in matters dealing with the State 
Sanitary Code and the State Environmental Code. The Public Health Nurse is primarily responsible 
for all medical clinical administrative matters. The Director of Public Health assumes primary 
responsibility for coordination among the various boards in permit granting and proper land use, 
specifically in the area of environmental protection issues (i.e. septic system design, wetland pollution, 
water quality protection). The Director designs programs and implements policies as proposed by 
the Andover Board of Health to meet the health needs of the community. The Board of Health 
consists of three volunteer members appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three-year terms. 



ACTI VTTY REPORT 



Board of Health Meetings 
Plan Reviews 
Restaurant Inspections 
Complaints & Investigations 
Administrative Hearings 
Court Actions 
Fees Collected 



Outreach Clinics 
Attendance 

Senior Center Clinics 
Attendance 

Office Visits 
Home Visits 

Influenza Immunization Clinic Attendance 
Pneumonia Immunization Attendance 

Cholesterol Screening Clinics 
Attendance 

Glucose Screening Clinics 
Attendance 

Mantoux Tuberculin Testing Attendance 

Positive Reactor Follow-up 

T.B. Clinic Case History, Appointments & Follow-up 



1995 


1996 


1997 


14 


12 


12 


152 


267 


312 


211 


160 


290 


208 


193 


283 


3 


2 


2 


5 


3 


2 


$53,765 


$64,017 


$71,907 


CLINIC REPORT 






35 


34 


33 


471 


390 


351 


49 


48 


47 


814 


720 


699 


169 


70 


243 


2 


5 


5 


1312 


1312 


1269 


32 


41 


32 


10 


9 


9 


164 


125 


131 


2 


1 


1 


9 


9 


6 


265 


129 


117 


45 


46 


41 


low-up 31 


20 


16 



24 



CLINIC REPORT (Cont.) 
Hepatitis B Immunization Clinics-Hepatitis B Vaccine 
Dohertv Middle School 



January 


1-101 


February 


2-94 


March 




May 


3-99 


June 




October 


1-100 


November 


2-105 



West Middle School 

1-100 

2-95 

3-95 
1-36 
2-86 



HEPATITIS B IMMUNIZATION TOTAL 



1161 



Measles Immunization Clinics were held in all of the Andover Public Schools following an 
outbreak of measles at the West Elementary School. Students, staff, teachers, and volunteers without 
proper proof of immunity were immunized. One thousand four hundred and seventeen (1417) were 
immunized with MMR. 



NON-COMMUNICABLE REPORTABLE DISEASES 



Other Mycobacteria 



Animal Bites 

Bacteremia 

Chicken Pox 

Campylobacter 

Cyclospora 

E. coli 0157.H7 

Giardia 

Hepatitis B 

Hepatitis C 

Listeriosis 

Lyme Disease 

Pertussis 

Hepatitis B 

Hepatitis C 

Measles (Rubeola) 

Meningitis (Viral) 

Pertussis (Whooping Cough) 

Salmonella 

Shigella 

Tuberculosis 

Legionella 

Yersinia Entercolitica 



1995 


1996 


1997 


1* 


2 





* Saprophytic 


Mycobacteria 




COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 






31 


32 


38 


1 








60 


23 


142 


12 


8 


3 








1 


1 


4 





6 


5 








6 


4 





1 





1 








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1 











7 








4 





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1 






25 



HEALTHY COMMUNITIES TOBACCO AWARENESS PROGRAM 

The mission of Healthy Communities Tobacco Awareness Program is to reduce tobacco use 
in Massachusetts by 50% by 1999. 

The Tobacco Awareness Program offers free technical assistance for worksite programs 
limiting smoking. It assists smokers who want to quit and sponsors public education to keep non 
smokers from starting. The staff consists of a Program Director, Health Educator, and part time 
Secretary. It assists in drafting tobacco regulations and conducts compliance check surveys of 
vendors selling tobacco to minors, since 60% of smokers start smoking before the age of 14. The 
following are some of the highlights ofHealthy Communities Tobacco Awareness Program Activities: 



COMPLIANCE CHECK SUMMARY: 





Sept. 
1994 


April 
1995 


Dec. 
1995 


April 
1996 


Jan. 
1997 


Vendors Inspected 


84 


102 


130 


107 


128 


Illegal Sales 


53 


20 


2 


6 


5 


Meeting State 
Compliance 


37% 


80% 


98% 


94% 


96% 


FREE CESSATION PROGRAM 











Currently Healthy Communities Tobacco Awareness Program offers free cessation classes 
to all community members. Classes start the first Monday and Wednesday evenings of every month, 
6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m, at Holy Family Hospital. Each class is held in four consecutive weeks. 



HOT SHOTS PROGRAM 

As part of the health curriculum, the Tobacco Program conducts a basketball tournament in 
conjunction with tobacco education surrounding the health risks associated with tobacco use and how 
it affects athletic abilities. Community youth in grades 5, 6, and 7 participate in the competition 
within the schools and then move on to compete in the Merrimack Valley Area. Final competitions 
were held at the Fleet Center in June as part of celebrating "World No Tobacco Day". 



26 



HEALTH DIVISION 



Total Revenue 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



Septic System Permits 



400 




1994 1995 1966 1907 



Complaints/Investigations 

35D- 




1004 1006 1006 1007 



Restaurant Licensing 




ISSt 19SS 1996 199T 



27 



PLANNING DIVISION 

The mission of the Planning Division is to ensure the orderly growth and development of the 
Town through sound planning practices and through the implementation of the recommendations 
of the Master Plan. 

1 997 saw a continuation of a trend observed in the previous year where development activity 
in Town shifted from residential to industrial and commercial. Although ten definitive, or final, 
residential subdivision plans were submitted to the Board in 1997, only four of those plans were 
approved creating forty-one new building lots. Compare this is the special permits issues by the 
Planning Board during the same period which approved more than 1.5 million square feet of new 
industrial space in the River Road area alone. 

Andover's downtown retail district likewise saw increased activity with work beginning on 
the re-development of the former bowling alley on Park Street and the approval of a new commercial 
office building on the site of the former Krinsky junk yard. The new Wild Harvest Market opened 
on Railroad Street and, in the Shawsheen area, the Courtyard Retail Center was completed and 
businesses began setting up shop. By year's end, the Marriott Corporation was nearing approval of 
a new 123-unit Assisted Living Facility on Haverhill Street. At the 1997 Spring Town Meeting, the 
Planning Board was successful in obtaining approval for several new zoning bylaws which will add 
protection to environmentally challenged land areas such as slopes and wetlands and which will, 
hopefully, create more liveable neighborhoods on the remaining land in Town. Additional new bylaws 
are proposed for the 1998 Annual Town Meeting. 

As indicated in last year's report, the Planning Board had anticipated additional revenues to 
be generated by new fee schedules adopted in the latter part of 1996. The Board's prediction was 
borne out as evidenced by the following statistics: 

1994 1995 1996 1997 



Planning Board Meetings 


23 


23 


23 


25 


Public Hearings Held 


102 


75 


57 


131 


ZBL Task Force Meetings 


1 


6 


3 


10 


Definitive Subdivision Plans 


10 


6 


4 


10 


Preliminary Subdivision Plans 


8 


4 


19 


9 


ANR Plans 


28 


19 


34 


42 


Site Plan Reviews 


4 


3 


1 


7 


Special Permits Issued 


25 


23 


23 


36 


Lot Releases and Clearance Certificates Issued 


62 


76 


78 


103 


Warrant Articles Reported 


25 


35 


40 


32 


Subdivision Guarantees 


$459,349 


$479,529 


$596,882 


$493,420 


Street Acceptances 


5 


12 


7 


9 


Revenues Generated 


$41,149 


$52,079 


$65,867 


$273,554 



28 



PLANNING DIVISION 



Subdivision Plans 



20 



15- 



10 



E 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



ANR Plans 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



Special Permits Issued 




1634 1985 1996 1997 



Public Hearings Held 



140 



120 



100 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



29 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapter 40A and 40B and the Town By-Laws. The Board 
meets on the first Thursday of each month in Memorial Hall Library, Memorial Hall, Elm Square. 
Five regular members and four associate members are appointed by the Board of Selectmen and serve 
without pay. The public hearings by the Board are the result of applications in the following areas: 

A variance from the requirements of the By-Laws 

• A special permit under the By-Laws 

• A person aggrieved by the decision of the Building Inspector or other Administrative Official 

• Permission to construct low or moderate income housing within the Town (Comprehensive 
Permit) 

Prior to hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches requested, legal 
advertisements are published and abutters are notified as required by law. The public hearings are 
conducted by the Chairman in conformity with the Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations. 
Following the hearings, the members of the Board, when deemed necessary, view each property in 
question and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter, open to the public, at which time the Board 
discusses the petitions which have been heard. Based on their views and the evidence presented at 
the hearing, a decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town Clerk. 



1996 1997 



HEARINGS HELD 
DELIBERATION MEETINGS 
PETITIONS FILED 
FEES COLLECTED 



12 


13 


12 


13 


63 


122 


$7,975 


$15,494 



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31 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The mission of the Department of Public Works is to continuously improve our quality of life 
by providing the finest potable water, state of the art disposal of our wastes (water and solids), and 
provide safe travel on our road network. 

ENGINEERING 

The Engineering Division prepared construction plans, cost estimates, specifications and bids, 
performed field layouts, inspections and construction supervision on projects such as: Pilgrim Drive 
and Pioneer Circle Sewer Construction; the reconstruction of the Frontage Road and Osgood Street 
intersection; the installation of new water mains on Center Street, Tewksbury Street, Marland Street 
and Oak Street; and the installation and repair of storm drains on Summer Street, Woburn Street and 
thirteen other various locations. The division also provided preliminary designs and field surveys to 
prepare for the upcoming construction projects such as: Center Street sidewalk and roadway 
reconstruction and sewer construction on Mayflower Road, Standish Circle, Reservation Road and 
Miles Circle. 

Staff members also assisted and coordinated with consultants on the planning and/or 
construction of such projects as the water distribution improvements on School Street, Haggetts 
Pond Road, High Plain Road, High Street, Flint Circle and North Main Street and improvements to 
the Fish Brook Pumping Station. Massachusetts Ffighway Department engineers were assisted on 
State Highway projects such as the Route 28 Reconstruction through Phillips Academy and the 
design of the River Road Bridge and Roadway Reconstruction. 

Planning and estimating for the reconstruction/resurfacing of sixty (60) Town streets was 
prepared this year, while assistance was given to the Highway Division during the actual work 
performed on thirty-nine (39) of these streets. Preliminary plans and estimates were also prepared 
for the proposed sewer extension to the Ballardvale Road and Sunset Rock Road area. 

Preliminary and Definitive Subdivision Plans and Site Plans were reviewed for the Planning 
Board and checked for design conformance, traffic safety, layout and adequacy of proposed roads 
and utilities. The construction of all roads and utilities in new subdivisions such as Somerset Village, 
Andover Country Club, Deering Estates, Minuteman Park and numerous other sites including the 
traffic improvements at North Main Street and Railroad Avenue were inspected and tested to insure 
compliance with Town standard requirements. Performance bond amounts were also calculated as 
requested by the Planning Board. 

Street opening permits for the installation and repair of various underground utilities, 
including many such excavations by Bay State Gas Company, Bell Atlantic, Massachusetts Electric 
and MediaOne contractors were issued through this division and the necessary utility markouts and 
inspections were carried out. 

The Engineering Division updated the Town Assessor's maps and printed the necessary copies 
for other Town Departments. The staff also provided and maintained records of various utilities, 
street excavations, residential, commercial and industrial site developments, street layouts and road 
maintenance. 

32 



1995 



1996 



1997 



Storm Drain Construction (ft.) 

Sewer Main Design & Construction (ft.) 

Water Main Construction (ft.) 

Streets Reconstructed/Resurfaced (miles) 

Street Opening Permits - Issued/Inspected 

Sewer Connections reviewed for Board of Health 

Assessor's Maps Updated 

Subdivision Plans reviewed - (# plans/#lots) 

Performance Bonds figured for Planning Board 

Subdivision Construction Inspections - 

Water Mains (ft.) 

Sewer Mains (ft.) 

Drain Lines (ft.) 

Sidewalks (ft.) 

Roads Paved: 
Binder Course (ft.) 
Top Course (ft.) 
Streets Reviewed for Town Acceptance 



4,112 


4,774 


2,232 








1,990 


7,053 


681 


20,550 


19.6 


18.2 


12.3 


195 


483 


278 


44 


74 


67 


102 


57 


63 


13/168 


20/183 


26/97 


17 


14 


12 


10,520 


14,309 


18,211 


6,535 


5,414 


7,000 


5,870 


2,589 


3,421 


4,010 


3,935 


5,301 


6,251 


4,103 


5,208 


15,187 


8,256 


9,270 


13 


11 


15 



HIGHWAY 

The Highway Division is responsible for the road maintenance, including rebuilding and 
resurfacing, of two hundred and fifty plus miles of existing roads. During the spring and summer, 
two sweepers are kept busy in continuous cleaning of all streets after winter sanding. Both sweepers 
start each morning at 5:00 A.M. The Highway Division assists the Engineering Division in its 
inspection of the conditions of new streets before they are accepted as public ways. The Highway 
Division also provides men and equipment for all other divisions when needed and is responsible for 
the maintenance and replacement of all Town drainage systems, including catch basins, storm drains 
and Town brooks. The Highway Division, with the help and cooperation of all other divisions of the 
Public Works Department and Department of Plant and Facilities, is also responsible for snow 
removal, ice control and flood control for all Town roads. 



Streets resurfaced 
Miles of road resurfaced 
Feet of berms constructed 
Catch basins cleaned 
Storm drains cleaned 
Catch basins repaired 
Storm drains repaired 



60 


57 


37 


19.6 


18.2 


12.3 


3,780 


4,370 


1,335 


1,477 


2,500 


528 


13 


10 


12 


71 


27 


46 


1 


2 


2 



33 



WATER 

The Water Division is responsible for the water supply, treatment, meter reading, billing and 
distribution of safe drinking water to the community. The water system consists of a 24 million 
gallon per day treatment facility, pumping stations and six distribution storage tanks. 

In 1997 the Water Division worked to ensure the quality of drinking water and its compliance 
with all State and Federal regulations. The standards for organic contaminants, inorganic chemicals 
and radioactivity are very stringent. We are pleased to report that Andover's supply complies with 
all standards specified by the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Department of Environmental 
Protection at the State and Federal levels. 

The Water Treatment Plant staff operates and maintains water treatment and the ozonation 
facility on an average often hours per day ofFpeak and twenty-four hours a day during high demand. 
Other responsibilities include monitoring of the fifteen million gallon per day Fishbrook Pumping 
Station, Bancroft Station and the Shawsheen waste water collection/pumping system. 

Our certified laboratory staff ensures testing and monitoring techniques to maintain system 
compliance. The treatment facilities operate 365 days per year. 

FY/95 FY/96 FY-97 



Hydrants Repaired 


43 


58 


34 


Hydrants Replaced 


3 


8 


1 


Hydrants Flushed 


14 


9 


7 


Water Main Breaks Repaired 


18 


26 


16 


House Service Leaks Repaired 


17 


14 


30 


House Services Renewed 





10 


12 


Water Main Taps 


17 


4 


10 


New Water Meters Installed 


89 


118 


160 


Old Water Meters Replaced 


144 


114 


138 


Water Meters Repaired 


9 


3 


3 


Water Shut Offs/Turn On 


247 


181 


224 


Gate Boxes Adjusted 


61 


58 


55 


Gallons of water treated (in millions) 


2,095 


1,952 


2,074 


Average daily gallons pumped (in millions) 


5.741 


4.941 


5.093 


Maximum day (in million gallons) 


13.403 


11.232 


10.430 


SEWER 









The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the wastewater pumping 
stations on Dale Street in Ballardvale, Bridle Path, Osgood Street, West Elementary School, 
Shawsheen Village, and the entire system of sanitary sewers. The sewerage system includes 70 miles 
of sanitary sewers and 5,062 connections. The raw sewage discharge from Shawsheen Village 



34 



Pumping Station is collected and transported by means of a force main through the City of Lawrence 
and treated by the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District's regional wastewater treatment plant. 



FY/95 



FY/96 



FY/97 



Sewer Main Blocks Cleared 


37 


43 


39 


Sewer Main Rodded - Maintenance 


11 


10 


12 


Sewer Mains Repaired 





2 


5 


Sewer Services Cleared 


20 


16 


15 


SOLID WASTE 









Andover, being a member of the North East Solid Waste Committee (NESWC), has its refuse 
transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant in North Andover where the refuse 
is incinerated to generate electricity. The Solid Waste Division oversees the mandatory curbside 
recycling program for newspapers/magazines, metal containers and glass, and the voluntary drop-off 
program collecting #1 , #2 plastics and aluminum materials. The Town also maintains a leaf and grass 
clippings compost site on High Plain Road, near Bald Hill, with the compost material being available 
to Town residents. 



FY/95 



FY/96 



FY/97 



Tons of residential refuse collected 

Tons of newspapers/magazines recycled 

Tons of glass recycled 

Tons of steel/tin containers recycled 

Tons of leaves & grass clippings composted 

Tons of #1 & #2 plastics 

Tons of aluminum materials 



10,507 


10,720 


11,586 


2,325 


2,157 


2,300 


372 


458 


484 


12 


7 


8 


1,645 


1,337 


2,000 


32 


37 


40 


6 


5 


4 



GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 

The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District Wastewater Treatment Facility continued to provide 
service to residential, commercial and industrial users in 1997. Since its initial operation in April 
1977, the facility has treated 236 billion gallons of wastewater that was previously discharged, 
untreated, into the Merrimack River. The plant is staffed by 44 people. The operation is continuous 
24 hours per day, 365 days per year. The District Commission meets monthly to address policy 
matters. 

FY/95 FY/96 FY/97 



Andover's daily average flow to the 
Sanitary District (in millions gallons) 



3.232 



3.565 



3.660 



35 



PUBLIC WORKS 
Engineering Division 



Water Main Const.(ft) 



25000 



20000 



15000 



10000 



5000 



Storm Drain Const.(ft.) 





5000 



4000 



3000 



2000 



1000 



1994 1995 1996 1997 




1984 1995 1996 1997 



Highway Division 



Streets Resurfaced (miles) 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



Catch Basins Cleaned 



2500 



2000 



1500 



1000 



500 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



36 



Water Division 



Water Mains Repaired 



i 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



House Service Repairs 




Hydrants Repaired 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



1994 1995 1996 1997 



37 



Water Division 



Meters Installed 



Water Treated (bil. gal.) 




35 



30 



25 



20 



15 



10 



1964 1995 1996 1997 




I I 



1994 1995 1996 1997 



Sewer Division 



Sewer Mains Cleared 



Sewer Services Cleared 





1994 1995 1996 1997 



1994 1995 1996 1997 



38 



Solid Waste Division 



Glass Recycled 



600 
700 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100- 



(Tons) 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



Paper Recycled 



100 




Refuse Recycled 



12000 



10000 



8000 



6000 



4000 



2000 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



((Tons) 



1994 1995 1996 1997 



(Tons) 



39 



PLANT AND FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Plant and Facilities Department is to provide responsive and cost 
effective maintenance services to all Town and School buildings, parks and grounds, vehicle 
maintenance, cemetery, forestry and other areas within their responsibility. 

The Plant and Facilities Department provides scheduled and routine maintenance services 
to all Town and School buildings, parks and grounds, cemetery, forestry and vehicle operations. 
Additionally, the Department is responsible for the following: 

• Implementation of all major buildings and grounds capital projects including new building 

construction projects. 
Managing the Town's fuel depot. 
Spring Grove Cemetery operations. 

Compliance with environmental, health and safety regulations. 
Custodial services in all Town buildings. 
Traffic lights. 

Trash pickup at Town and School buildings. 
Town-owned street lighting. 
Town switchboard operations. 
Bald Hill leaf composting facility. 

The Plant and Facilities Department is managed by a Director who is supported by three 
superintendents, an administrative assistant, a temporary construction project manager, a vehicle 
maintenance foreman, a work control center coordinator, a purchasing/inventory coordinator, an 
accounts payable clerk, part-time telephone operators and a diverse group of maintenance 
workers, grounds and trees workers, custodians and vehicle mechanics. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISIONS 

The Building Maintenance and Mechanical/Electrical Divisions are supervised by two 
superintendents and provide all maintenance services including electrical, mechanical, plumbing, 
carpentry, painting and security to all Town and School buildings, which total in excess of a million 
square feet. Additionally, they provide custodial services to Town buildings, maintain traffic signals 
and exterior Town-owned light poles and manage all building-related capital projects. 

During 1997 these two divisions completed 3,951 work orders. 

1996 1997 

Town 1,108 1,325 

School 1,813 2,626 



40 



PARKS AND GROUNDS DIVISION 

The three Parks and Grounds Divisions (Parks and Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry) are 
independent and interdependent. They all operate under the supervision of one superintendent. They 
share certain pieces of equipment and work together on special projects. As with any public agency 
with manpower, special equipment and vehicles in its inventory, the three divisions perform many 
tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties such as delivering surplus 
government food to the Senior Center, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole maintenance, 
fence/gate/backstop repairs, drainage connections, ice control, snow removal, and moving 
extraordinarily heavy objects such as the whiskey barrels used as planters in the downtown area. 

PARKS 

This division maintains 2.75 million square feet of ballfields and 1 .4 million square feet of lawn 
areas. Ballfields are located on all school grounds and other areas such as Recreation Park, 
Ballardvale Playground, upper Shawsheen, lower Shawsheen, the Bowling Green, and the 
Deyermond Field. Lawn areas include the grounds of all Town and School buildings, parks, 
playgrounds and designated islands, triangles and other parcels throughout the Town. Ballfields are 
prepared (groomed and lined) for all secondary school athletic events. Turf maintenance consists of 
mowing, aerating, watering, overseeding, liming, fertilizing and controlling weeds and insects. 
Pesticide operations are conducted by trained and licensed personnel using approval pesticides and 
methods. This division also maintains small trees, shrubs and shrub beds on Town property and cuts 
back brush encroaching upon ballfields and recreation areas. 

CEMETERY 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town of Andover. 
The cemetery contains approximately sixty acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 1997, 
there were 92 burials and 105 grave sites were sold. Cemetery operations and maintenance includes 
burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, pruning of shrubs and small trees, leaf pickup, snow removal, 
care of its own facilities and equipment, and other tasks such as trash in Recreation Park and drainage 
and construction work at other Town facilities. 

FORESTRY 

Forestry is responsible for the maintenance of trees along the roadside, on school property 
and other Town-owned land. Approximately 25% of the personnel's time is spent on pruning trees, 
storm repairs, flatclearing areas of undesirable vegetation and removing obstructions at intersections 
and curves for improved visibility. The Forestry Division also mows tall weeds along the Town-wide 
roadsides throughout the Town. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The Vehicle Maintenance Division is supervised by a working foreman and provides 
maintenance to all Town vehicles and major pieces of equipment including fire apparatus, police 
cruisers, DPW trucks and equipment, Plant and Facilities trucks and equipment and other support 
vehicles. This division processed 1,531 work orders in 1997. 

41 



MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 

This division of the Department of Plant and Facilities is responsible for scheduling and 
renting school facilities during after school hours as well as scheduling and renting School and Town 
athletic fields, Recreation Park and the Town House function facility on Main Street. 

SCHOOLS 

The overall number of school rentals and uses during 1997 was 4, 190 which is consistent with 
the number of uses during 1996. Overall, gymnasium spaces continued to comprise the majority of 
the rental and scheduling contracts with use of the auditoriums, cafeterias and other spaces making 
up the remainder of the scheduled uses. Figures below do not include rentals or uses of the Andover 
High School athletic fields, gymnasium, field house or Collins Center which are all scheduled through 
the School Administration Offices. 

1 997 Permits Issued: 4, 1 90 

Department of Community Services: 36.3% 

Private Rentals: 39.7% 

School Events: 24% 

FIELDS 

School and Town playing fields continued to be rented to capacity in 1997 due to the growing 
number of participants in youth and adult sports leagues. 

Overall use was up 9% from 2, 1 2 1 uses in 1 995 to 2,3 1 5 uses in 1 997. Youth athletic leagues 
such as Little League and Youth Soccer continued to comprise the majority of field rentals with 
scheduling for Youth Football, Girls Softball, adult sports leagues and Town-sponsored recreation 
programs and very few private rentals making up the remainder of uses. 

New programs such as boys and girls lacrosse and sports clinics sponsored by the Andover' s 
Youth Services and Department of Community Services continue to draw more participants each year 
and will add to existing scheduling constraints on Town and School fields which are booked to 
maximum capacity seven days each week during each sports season. 



1997 Permits Issued: 


2,323 


Youth Leagues 


81.2% 


Department of Community Services/ 




Andover Youth Services 


12.5% 


Private Rentals/Adult Leagues 


6.3% 


REC PARK 





Recreation Park is available for private rentals on weekends from May to October. During 
weekday events the Park's softball field and tennis courts are scheduled for Department of 



42 



Community Services tennis classes, recreational programs and a co-ed softball league. The total 
number of scheduled uses remains almost exactly the same from the previous year with the number 
of youth league rentals decreasing from 47 uses during the 1996 season to 17 this past year when 
several of the school ballfields that were offline in 1996 were once again available in 1997. Private 
rentals increased in 1997 by 13 rentals when the field was freed up from youth sports scheduling. 

1997 Rentals/Uses: 191 

Department of Community Services 134 

Youth Leagues 17 

Private Renters 40 

OLD TOWN HALL 

The function hall at the Andover Town House has been available to rent by municipal/school 
groups, residents and non-residents for special events since February, 1990. The total number of 
rentals in 1997 was up 12% from 1996. Increases were in the number of rentals by residents and non- 
residents for private functions and uses by School and Town organizations remained the same. 

1997 Rentals: 92 

Residents 47 

School/Municipal 35 

Non-Residents 10 



1997 DEPARTMENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The following are the 1997 Plant and Facilities Department Accomplishments: 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE 

Bancroft Elementary School (Response to air quality issues) 
Sealed exterior walls 
Exterior roof repairs 
Extensive interior dust removal 
Refinished sink counters in nine classrooms 
Roof repairs and window caulking 

Bancroft Elementary School Modular Classrooms 

Provided support to design & installation of four new modular classrooms (completed 12/97) 

Andover High School (support to construction project) 
Constructed a 27' classroom wall 
Installed snowguards on the main entrance roof 
Structural improvements to cafeteria stairwell 



43 



1997 DEPARTMENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS (Cont.) 

Re-keyed 225 door locks 

Roof evaluation and roof repairs 

Carpet removal Collins Center 

Installed parking lot signs 

Refinished wardrobes and blackboards in 50 classrooms 

Patched 50 holes in flooring 

Structural improvements to field press boxes and bleachers at Lovely Field 

Numerous miscellaneous support items 

West Elementary School 

Constructed walls in pods A and B resulting in 20 enclosed classrooms 

Environmental 

Completed site assessments and filings to DEP for Sanborn & Shawsheen elementary schools 
for underground fuel tank removal projects in prior years 
Completed site assessment and remediation work at the Town yard 

Doherty Middle School 

Installed new sound system 

Installed new stage curtain and fire curtain 

Installed carpeting 

Town Buildings 

Installed new exterior signs at Town Offices 

Installed new carpeting in portions of the Town Offices and Senior Center 

Phase I of the Town's ADA compliance program was completed including: 

~ Marked location for handicapped parking spaces and school/town parking lots 

~ West Middle School - fifty doors were retrofitted with ADA approved hardware 

~ Library - automatic door operator installed 

~ Senior Center - automatic door operator installed 

~ Bancroft School - handrails installed at lower ramp 

~ High School Auditorium - masonry stairway repairs completed. 

MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISION 

Expanded and improved the Preventive Maintenance Program - new second shift mechanic added. 

An agreement was signed with Mass Electric for a Town wide energy management system study. 
All Town and School buildings are being surveyed to develop a master plan to expand the existing 
energy management system to allow remote monitoring and troubleshooting of all HVAC equipment. 
Mass Electric is paying 75% of the cost of the study. Plant & Facilities has continued to aggressively 
pursue energy funds in the Mass Electric Design 2000 Program. Extensive on the job technical 
training for staff members has been ongoing. 

44 



1997 DEPARTMENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS (ConU 

The following capital projects were completed: 

Bancroft School (Response to air quality issues) 

Boilers converted to dual fuel capability (oil & gas) 

Replaced (12) unit ventilators. Installed isolation valves for heating system piping 

Installed Direct Digital Controls for four media center air handlers 

Installed and rebuilt pneumatic controls for upper-level unit ventilators and gym and cafeteria 

air handlers 

Air balanced building 

Replaced piping and pipe insulation in media center, gym, and cafeteria 

Replaced deteriorated main heating/cooling piping system from boiler room to main building 

Town Offices 

Installed variable frequency drive to correct heating problems 

Sanborn School 

Replaced thermostats and 50% of the control valves 

Doherty School 

Replaced all smoke detectors. 

Shawsheen School & West Middle School 

Major asbestos removal projects were completed in the boiler rooms during the summer 

ADMINISTRATION 

New purchasing/inventory coordinator hired - new inventory system being implemented 

Improved controls and accountability for all department purchases 

All office staff trained on PC use - implemented Auto-CAD (computer-aided design) capabilities 

Improved maintenance work order report format 

Restructured key office positions 

Hired construction project manager - initiated and supported RFPs for Senior Center, Middle School 
and Safety Center design projects 

Provided extensive support to AndoverHigh School construction project including a Safety Observer 
and Senior Citizen Monitors 

Provided planning, engineering and administrative support to modular classrooms at Bancroft School 

Initiated air quality investigation and corrective action plan for Bancroft School 

45 



1997 DEPARTMENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS (ConU 

TOWN HOUSE 

Increased the number of school/town and private rentals at the Town House 

Maintained a balance of youth league and private rentals of School and Town athletic facilities 

Expanded Town/School use and private rentals of Recreation Park 

Worked with Town officials to implement modest fee increases for rental of Town and School 
facilities - the first such increases in more than ten years 

PARKS & GROUNDS 

All goals achieved which included maintaining and improving turf on Town-wide ballfields and parks 
and grooming and striping athletic fields 

Support also given to the High School baseball field including seeding, aeration, and soil treatment 

CEMETERY 

All goals achieved at Spring Grove Cemetery which included maintaining the grounds and roads, 
providing timely interment services, and maintaining all records 

FORESTRY 

Achieved all goals which included the continued maintenance and removal of roadside trees, 
controlling roadside litigation and timely response to all emergency situations. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE 

The Town-wide preventative maintenance program on all vehicles and major equipment was 
expanded and improved 

The spare parts inventory system will expand and improve with the assistance of the recently hired 
Purchasing/Inventory Coordinator 

All replacement vehicles listed in the Capital Improvement Program were purchased 



46 



Fuel consumption statistics; Town owned Fuel Depot (U.S. Gallons). 







1995 


1996 


1997 


Police Dept 


Gasoline 


34,360 


34,134 


37,866 


Fire Dept 


Gasoline 


4,249 


3,985 


4,344 




Diesel 


7,529 


8,631 


9,846 


DPW 


Gasoline 


11,468 


13,140 


14,344 




Diesel 


13,450 


20,500 


15,912 


DMM 


Gasoline 


18,773 


18,690 


18,163 




Diesel 


3,675 


5,156 


4,817 


Collaborative 


Diesel 


7,436 


6,709 


6,873 


Council Aging 


Gasoline 


614 


658 


537 


Library 


Gasoline 


2,243 


2,264 


3,176 


Town Admin. 


Gasoline 


437 


426 


474 



47 



Plant & Facilities 



Work Orders Processed 




1996 



1997 



2 Town 

Schools 
£3 Vehicle Maintenance 



100 



Grave Sites Sold 



200 



150 



100 




Burials 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



1994 1995 1996 1997 



48 



Plant & Facilities 



Rec Park Rentals 



200 



150 



100 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



Town House Rentals 



100 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



Permits Issued 



6000 
5000 
4000 
3000 
2000 
1000 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



HI School Buildings 
33 Field Rentals 



*decrease due to school construction 



49 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Police Department is to protect our future and the 
quality of life in Andover. We are empowered to protect life and property, but, with the 
changing times of increasing social problems, our agency has become more service-oriented 
to the community. To continue our mission, we will maintain an open door policy to the 
community, working with their suggestions, needs and thoughts so that we may preserve the 
way of life that we all enjoy in Andover. 



OPERATIONS DIVISION 

The Operations Division experienced a great deal of activity throughout 1997. While 
the total number of incidents rose 21 % last year, reported crimes were down. Breaking and 
Entering is at a five year low with a decrease of 24% from last year and reported thefts are 
down 29%. Motor vehicle accidents are down by 7% and vandalism decreased by 6%. 
Reported assaults increased by 32 % over last year, but are still lower than they were in 1994 
and 1995. 

Electronic parking meters were installed in the Park Street lot replacing the decaying 
mechanical meters. A major traffic calming effort was instituted that created many changes 
to some of the heavier traveled roadways. By working with both the Town and State's 
Highway Departments, the following intersections were redesigned: Frontage Road @ 
Osgood Street, Reserveration Road @ Culter Road, Chandler Road @ River Road, and 
Route 28 @ Phillips Academy. Many posted speed limit signs were erected also with the help 
of the State Highway Department. The purchase of the "Smart Unit", a speed detection 
indicator, further helped with the traffic calming strategy. The installation of the Opticom 
system on numerous traffic lights in Town increased drivers' awareness of approaching 
emergency vehicles and provided emergency vehicles with the right of way. 

Through local community groups, the Andover Police Department has been involved 
in several safety fairs, such as the League of Women Voters' "Know Your Town", the 
Andover Center Association's Sidewalk Bazaar Days as well as safety days at businesses such 
as NYNEX and PictureTel. Funded by the Governor's Highway Safety Bureau, the car safety 
seat loaner program was expanded. Also, many neighborhood and youth organizations have 
been targeted for safety awareness programs. 

The Department saw the retirement of three officers this year: Sgt. George Miller 
with thirty years of service; Officer Calvin Metcalf with twenty-nine years of service and 
Officer Joseph Ouellette with twenty-seven years of service. The Department welcomed one 
new officer who is not only a Town resident but also has several family members with 
dedicated Town service. Officer David Milne completed his recruit training and is now 
assigned to patrol. 



50 



Two members of the Operations Division were recognized for their outstanding 
service to the community and received the Department's Life Saving Awards for their 
actions. Dispatcher Patricia Ward, with fourteen years of service, provided instructions on 
the Heimlich Maneuver over the telephone that saved the life of a choking child. Sgt. Brian 
Pattullo, with sixteen years of service, dislodged an obstruction from an infant's airway. 



RECORDS DIVISION 

The Records Division provides support services to the entire Police Department. This 
support service enables information to flow efficiently throughout the department as well as 
to the entire community. 

This division addressed 922 requests for information and issued sixty-eight firearms 
identification cards. Changes in State laws necessitated the development and implementation 
of a Sex Offender Registry database. The development of a new off-duty detail program was 
instituted by a Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Team and many changes were made 
in the process. Five computer terminals were replaced with personal computers and Windows 
95 training was provided. A software program called C.R.I.M.E.S. was purchased and 
implemented that allows composite sketches to be generated by computer. 

Through the use of the FY97 Community Policing Grant, a citizen survey was sent 
to 2,000 residents in an effort to identify the needs of the residents. This survey is now being 
evaluated and results will be available by the end of the first quarter of next year. The FY98 
Community Policing Grant of $22,000 was awarded which will provide the department with 
a website and Internet access. A $17,300 DARE Grant was awarded in order to continue 
with the DARE program and expand the program to off hours. An additional officer will be 
trained in DARE to provide coverage as needed. By working closely with the School 
Department and various other organizations, the DARE program has been extremely 
successful in providing the youths of Andover a closer relationship with the Police 
Department. 



DETECTIVE DIVISION 

During the year, members of the Detective Division investigated 425 reported 
incidents. Although breaks were down from last year, breaks into construction trailers were 
up. Other police agencies in the area report similar construction area breaks and thefts. After 
conducting investigations into these breaks, ten incidents were cleared and seven suspects 
charged. 

Reported robberies were the same as 1996 with 4 reported incidents. A Phillips 
Academy student was assaulted and robbed by three males while walking on Main Street 
After investigating the incident, a search warrant was served on their apartment and two 
individuals were arrested. A third suspect has been arrested on a warrant and all are pending 



51 



trial. A young male was assaulted and robbed while riding a bicycle in West Andover. Two 
suspects have been charged in that robbery. 

Thefts by fraudulent checks and credit card use stayed the same with forty five 
incidents reported. The total amount of all fraud cases total $32,200.00. Most of the 
incidents have been cleared by arrest, summons or civil settlement. Several of these cases are 
still under investigation. Two local youths were charged with ordering items to be delivered 
to their homes that were charged to stolen credit card numbers. They had obtained the card 
numbers from slips stolen by a friend working in a restaurant. 

Larceny reports were the same as the 1996 level with 41 incidents reported. Many 
of the reports were from businesses reporting what appears to be internal thefts. Office 
equipment and laptop computers were the main items stolen. During the year numerous 
thefts from rooms at a local motel were reported. After investigation, an employee at the 
motel was charged with six thefts from guests. 

The Juvenile Officer was involved in thirty three juvenile cases and made contact with 
fifty three youths. The most serious case involved arson fires. During August and the Fall 
months there were several dumpster fires in the central business area. At the end of 
November there was a noted increase in the frequency of the fires. The fires escalated to 
building fires with four serious attempts to burn buildings. Two local youths were charged 
with thirteen arsons. Another juvenile has been charged with two breaks into dwellings and 
the vandalism of a painting at the Memorial Hall Library. The painting was valued at $6,000. 
Most of the other cases involved truancy, stubborn child or runaway type incidents. 

During 1997 the division attempted to locate latent fingerprint evidence at sixty nine 
crime scenes. As a result, successful matches with suspects were made in eighteen cases. 
Detectives processed 489 booking photographs into the ImageServer program and issued 1 62 
handgun permits. Detectives also photographed 108 crime and accident scenes. Due to a 
change in immigration laws, the division experienced a large increase in the number of 
residents requesting inked fingerprints. This was also combined with addition requests for 
job security checks at State and Federal levels. As a result approximately 200 residents 
requested this service. 

As in the past, the Detective Division continued to be involved in community activity. 
We assisted at an elderly fair where one of the main topics discussed was the various scams 
that effect senior citizens. On three separate occasions we participated in mystery programs 
conducted by schools and summer youth programs. Students were educated in crime scene 
evidence recovery and latent print examination. In each case students assisted at mock crime 
scenes. 



52 



ANIMAL CONTROL 

In 1997, the Animal Control Division saw a slight decrease in the number of calls 
answered as well as the number of dog complaints. There was also a decrease in the number 
of citations issued and the amount of fines associated with those citations. 

The Animal Control Officer continued with an ongoing program of posting 
notification signs of the Canine Waste Law in public areas. He also spoke to various groups 
on animal safety and rabies awareness including several local schools, neighborhood groups, 
and other interested residents. Rabies continues to be a major concern and focus for the 
Animal Control Officer. 

1995 1996 1997 



Number of citations Issued 


41 


39 


34 


Fines/Fees collected 


$2,072 


$2,403 


$1,875 


Dog Complaints 


523 


545 


458 


Impounded Dogs 


95 


100 


93 


Impounded Cats 


25 


27 


12 


Number of Calls Answered 


1,472 


1,372 


1,155 


EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT 







The Emergency Management Section serves as the local link to the Federal and State 
Emergency Management Agencies (FEMA/MEMA). Included in this section is a network 
of HAM radio operators that are on standby should the need arise for auxiliary radio services. 

The Auxiliary Police assisted the regular officers of the Police Department many times 
throughout the year. They are particularly active during the holidays and on Halloween. 
These are very dedicated groups of volunteers and the Town is fortunate to have their 
services as a resource. 



53 



Andover Police Department 

Annual Summary 





1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 




Total Incidents 


24,337 


23,807 


22,378 


25,501 


30,873 




Adult Arrest 


529 


469 


454 


365 


377 


Juvenile Arrests 


47 


40 


17 


27 


27 


Total Arrests 


576 


509 


471 


392 


404 




Rape 


8 


3 


1 


1 


4 




B&E 


172 


156 


134 


121 


91 




Assault 


72 


93 


97 


58 


77 




Larceny 


386 


506 


619 


607 


427 




Stolen MV 


145 


115 


104 


93 


64 




Stolen Bicycles 


40 


55 


70 


62 


37 




Domestic Abuse 


33 


30 


29 


36 


29 




MV Fatalities 


2 


3 


3 


2 


3 




MV Accidents 


1,224 


1,240 


1,219 


1,318 


1,225 




Vandalism 


304 


337 


223 


227 


213 




Parking Violations 


11,123 


12,049 


10,349 


10,074 


8,099 




MV Citations 


3,179 


4,105 


3,760 


3,578 


4,194 




Mileage 


381,758 


393,893 


393,901 


400,263 


395,546 




Gasoline 


36,281 


35,339 


34,573 


36,020 


37,207 



54 



Police Department 



Assaults 



100 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



700 



Total Arrests 



600 



500 



400 



300 



200 



100 



Larceny 



600 



500 



400 



300 



200 



100 




1994 1995 1996 1997 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



55 



Police Department 



Motor Vehicle Citations 



5000 



4000 



3000 



2000 



1000 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



Motor Vehicle Accidents 



1400 

1200 

1000 

800 

600 

400 



200 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



Stolen Motor Vehicles 



120 



100 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



56 



Police Department 



Parking Violations 



14000 



12000 



10000 



8000 



6000 



4000 



2000 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



Domestic Abuse 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



Breaking & Entering 



120 



100 




1994 1995 1996 1997 



57 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 

1995 1996 1997 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 

Number of animals tested for Rabies 

Number of barns inspected 

Number of beef calves under one year 

Number of beef cows over two years 

Number of beef heifers one to two years 

Number of beef bulls 

Number of beef cattle over two years 

Number of beef cattle under two years 

Number of beef steers 

Number of beef herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 

Number of donkeys 

Number of horses (includes work & saddle horses) 

Number of ponies 

Number of goats 

Number of sheep 

Number of swine 

Number of swine herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 



23 


24 


37 


15 


68 


17 


20 


21 


20 


15 








50 








11 








10 










72 


54 







10 


26 


11 


3 


2 


2 


2 








2 


60 


52 


55 


19 


19 


19 


11 


24 


1 


7 


2 


4 


155 


102 


92 


2 


2 


2 



58 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Fire Department is to proudly protect lives and property by 
providing prompt, skillful, cost-effective fire protection and life safety services to the residents of 
Andover. 



To achieve its mission, the Fire Department strives to prevent loss to property from fire or 
fire-related activities through inspections, training and maintaining its fire alarm system; loss of life 
through prompt professional delivery of emergency medical services using both fire and ambulance 
vehicles. The Department provides programs to increase fire safety awareness among area citizens 
annually in all schools and whenever requested by private organizations, industries and businesses. 



1995 



1996 



1997 



Total Incidents: 


5408 


5410 


5491 


Fires 


233 


239 


293 


Rescues 


23 


13 


12 


Miscellaneous Alarms 


53 


174 


140 


Accidental Alarms 


535 


860 


907 


Mutual Aid (Fire Calls) 


30 


17 


25 


False Alarms 


130 


161 


180 


Violations 


6 


8 


2 


Ambulance Emergency Calls 


2008 


2105 


2009 


Ambulance Mutual Aid Calls 


224 


313 


227 


Fire Prevention Activities 


2062 


1767 


1757 


Permits/Licenses Issued: 


1646 


1745 


2152 


Smoke Detectors 


599 


665 


666 


Report Copies 


38 


67 


68 


Blasting Permits 


8 


8 


14 


Cutting/Welding Permits 


39 


17 


28 


Dumpster Permits 


59 


111 


117 


Fireworks Display Permits 


1 


1 


2 


Gunpowder Storage Permits 











Liquid Gas Storage Permits 


34 


39 


53 


Flamm. Liquid Storage Permits 





3 


2 


Miscellaneous Permits 


8 


3 


2 


Open Air Burning Permits 


549 


523 


791 


Oil Burner Install Permits 


147 


117 


154 


Reinspection Fees 


25 


14 





Commercial Fire Alarm Systems 


14 


9 


1 


Special Suppression System Permits 


1 


1 





Sprinkler Install Permits 


41 


39 


64 


Tentage Permits 


10 


19 


1 



59 



1995 



1996 



1997 



Permits/Licenses Issued (Cont): 



Underground Tank Recertification 
Underground Tank Removals 
Underground Tank Install Permits 
Master Fire Alarm Boxes 



4 

75 



125 



3 
107 


129 



4 
72 

2 
132 



Facilities: 



Apparatus/Equipment: 



Central Station 

32 North Main Street 



3 ambulances, 1 ladder truck, 
1 pumper, 1 boat, 4 sedans, 
1 brush truck 



West Station 

Greenwood & Chandler Roads 



2 pumpers, 1 fire alarm truck, 
1 boat, 1 brush truck 



Ballardvale Station 
Clark & Andover Streets 



1 pumper, 1 boat 



Personnel: 



1995 



1996 



1997 



68.5 



68.7 



68.7 



Income: 



Ambulance Fees $248,0 1 8 

Permits/Licenses 28,947 

Fire Alarm Box Fees 18,750 



$314,069 $358,186 
25,500 32,210 

18,750 20,250 



60 



STATISTICAL DATA 



Total Incidents 
Total Permits/Lies. 
Total MA Fire Calls 



Total Amb. Calls 
Total MA Amb.Calls 




1994 



1995 



1996 



1997 




Q Amb.Fees Perm/Lie Fees 

1 F.A.Box Fees 



61 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

The mission of the Memorial Hall Library is to make available a broad range of library 
materials, to provide up-to-date and accurate information, to offer services and programs desired 
by the community ofAndover, to act as the most convenient point of access for the needed materials 
and information and to actively seek to make community members and organizations aware of 
library resources and services. 



Our vision for the Town's library is a place where the community's past is connected to the 
present in a way that prepares us for the future. The library building is itself a memorial to the Civil 
War and the people who fought in it. The collections of the library record where we are at this time 
and, when read, prepare us for the choices we make now and in the future. As the preferred medium 
for learning changes from the printed word to electronic messages, the library re-organizes itself by 
making new connections to the outside world and helping our community navigate the information 
highway. The library continues to adjust and reinvent itself to address the changed information 
environment. Among the achievements of 1997 were the following: 

• A federal grant in the amount of $22,000 awarded to establish library services for the Chinese 
and Russian community of Merrimack Valley. Approximately 1,000 items were added to the 
collection and they circulated 5,000 times. Six programs of educational and cultural 
programs were presented. 

An increased program of regional reference services to school, academic and special libraries 
as well as 1 7 additional public libraries, all now in the newly formed Northeast Massachusetts 
Regional Library System. 

• An increase in inter-library loan services to the school, academic and special libraries now in 
Northeast Massachusetts Regional Library System. 

Approximately 150 CD-ROMS were added to the library's collection. 

The circulation of more than 510,000 items which included an 8% increase in children's 
circulation and a 9.3% increase in non-print circulation. 

A 12% increase in reference transactions. 

• An increase in Children's Room use including 66 class visits for story hours and orientation, 
58 "LITKITS" (literature kits) circulated to schools with each kit containing 20 books. 

• A monthly series of speakers on Wednesday mornings on subjects ranging from local history 
to holiday traditions. 

The Asian Indians in Andover presented a program celebrating the 50 th anniversary of India' s 
independence. 

62 



The selection and acquisition of "Gargoyle", a sculpture by Andover resident and artist Pat 
Keck, by the Art Committee of the Board of Library Trustees. 

The success of the library depends upon the support of the community, the interest and 
dedication of the Library Trustees, and the hard work of the library staffand volunteers. We are most 
fortunate to have all of these qualities in abundance. 



STATISTICAL SUMMARY OF LIBRARY USAGE IN 1997 



Children's Circulation 

1994 185,198 

1995 195782 

1996 197950 

1997 213904 



Children's Circulation 



220 



-a 

c 

CO 

O 



200 



180 



160 




1994 



1995 



1996 



1997 



63 



Annual Report 1997 
Statistics 



Reference Questions 

1994 33,598 

1995 35,448 

1996 39,122 

1997 43,834 



Reference Questions 




1994 



1995 



1996 



1997 



Total Non-Print Circulations 

1994 77,507 

1995 91,833 

1996 95,486 

1997 104,361 



Total Non-Print Circulations 




1994 



1995 



1996 



1997 



Total Circulation of Materials 

1994 483,428 

1995 490,293 

1996 500,908 

1997 510,226 



Total Circulation of Materials 



520 



■g 500 •- 

c 

CD 

CO 

3 

o 



480 



460 




CO 

c 

co 4 
o 



L 



PC & Internet Use 

1994 

1995 

1996 2,079 

1997 7,742 



PC & Internet Use 




1994 



1995 



1996 



1997 



1994 



1995 



1996 



1997 



64 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 

The mission of the Division of Elder Services is to identify, develop, implement and advocate 
for programs and services designed to enhance the quality of life and independence of elders in the 
community, and to provide a focal point in the community where these programs and services can 
be easily accessed by elders and their families. 



THE VERONICA B. SMITH AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE 

Our crowning achievement in 1997 was the receipt of the Veronica B. Smith Award for 
Excellence. This award, presented by the Massachusetts Association of Councils on Aging and Senior 
Centers, honors a Senior Center which exemplifies creativity and ingenuity in successful program and 
service design and delivery. This award, a once in a lifetime achievement, is presented only when a 
suitable candidate emerges. The Andover Senior Center is proud to receive this award, named in 
memory of a truly creative and hardworking advocate for elders. The staff is grateful to the citizens 
of Andover, particularly its elders, for their support in personal time, energy and generosity of heart- 
all of which make awards such as this possible. 

CUSTOMERS 

There are nearly 5,000 elder residents of Andover, approximately 1 5% of the total population. 
The number is growing and closely tracking the national rate of growth. At the same time, more 
Andover elders are participating in programs and seeking services at the Senior Center. Statistical 
charts and graphs below report and demonstrate these increases in programs and services. 

STAFF. VOLUNTEERS AND SERVICES 

Staff of the Elder Services Division continues to plan and provide a wide range of core 
services and programs. Additionally, they create new and unique programs and services to meet the 
demands of the growing population and the specific needs of this community. Growth in productivity 
is measured in the increasing numbers of elders seeking assistance, offering their time in volunteer 
activities and in the growing number of participants in programs and activities. 

One of the new programs and services provided by volunteers is the FIX-IT-SHOP, conceived 
and operated by older men who saw a need not available in the community. Elders bring small items 
such as lamps and chairs and volunteers repair them for the cost of the parts. It is literally, an 
"overnight" success. 

The Computer group, comprised of volunteer older men and women, plan and teach 
introductory and intermediate computer classes, geared specifically to the older learner, at the Drop 
in Center at Old Town Hall. Donated equipment and fees are the basis for the operation of this very 
popular program. 



65 



The Medical Equipment Loan program offers the loan of a variety of donated, used, durable 
medical equipment to help elders post-hospitalization or injury. The program works in cooperation 
and coordination with other agencies in the area. 

Volunteerism increased dramatically from 15,519 hours in FY1996 to 19,079 in FY1997. 
Other areas of significant increase are the number of elders receiving Meals on Wheels and those 
requesting Outreach Services. The Friendly Visitor Program continues to attract and train volunteer 
visitors of all ages to match the increase in those needing this important service. The number of 
recreational, cultural and educational programs also continues to grow. A new volunteer group, 
ALLSO (Andover Lifetime Learners Society), was created to offer stimulating educational courses. 

A cooperative program with Jewish Family Services received funding for English-as-a-Second 
Language (ESL) classes which has a unique, hands-on approach to helping older new citizens 
improve their English and incorporate into the community. The Center continues to serve as a clinical 
field placement to Greater Lawrence Vocational School and is actively seeking other connections 
with area colleges and universities. The Tax Voucher Program placed 91 elder taxpayers in various 
jobs throughout Town Government and the Schools. Cultural and Intergenerational programs 
expanded and created new opportunities. 

GOALS 

The annual planning and self-evaluation process was conducted and new goals and objectives 
set for the new year as follows: 

1. Social Services Coordination : to increase and strengthen social, outreach and day care 
services; to improve coordination efforts with other service providers by improving internal systems, 
program design and delivery; creating an executive level community providers network; to work in 
cooperation with Police, Fire and other agencies to implement TRIAD, a community crime prevention 
program. 

2. Advocacy : to develop a comprehensive plan which will identify issues and provide 
opportunities for elders to advocate for positive change. 

3. Programs & Education : to provide increased opportunities for seniors and other members 
of the community, who are not currently using the Center or services provided by the Center, to 
actively participate in programs of a cultural, educational and inter-generational nature. 

4. Nutrition : to conduct a complete evaluation of the nutritional services of the Senior Center, 
both on and off-site, and to set goals and guidelines for future nutritional services to combat 
malnutrition. 

5. Transportation : to study the medical and general transportation needs of elders and develop 
recommendations to the Town Meeting of 1999. 



66 



6. Volunteer Opportunities : to continue to develop the number and quality of volunteer 
opportunities at the Senior Center and to increase awareness in the community regarding the need 
for volunteers of all ages. 

7. Evaluation : to conduct a self-assessment study using the National Council on Aging Senior 
Center Standards. 

THE NEW SENIOR CENTER 

Following the 1997 Annual Town Meeting, the Board of Selectmen appointed the Senior 
Center Designer Selection Team. The role of this group of citizens and key staffis to assist the Town 
Manager in hiring an architectural firm which will conduct a feasibility study, including site evaluation 
and building design. The Team will recommend an architect early in 1998. 




PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN AT THE VERONICA B. SMITH AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE CEREMONY 



67 



DESCRIPTION 



ANNUAL REPORT 1997 
F.Y.1994 F.Y. 1995 



FY1996 



FY1997 



ELDERLY SOCIAL DAY CARE 

Number of Individual Clients 
Total Days Used 

INSTRUCTIONAL CLASSES 

Number of Unduplicated Elders 

LECTURES & SEMINARS 

Number of Lectures & Seminars 
Number of Attendees 



39 

3,007 



100 



25 

630 



51 
2,952 



150 



30 
900 



40 
3,434 



212 



36 

810 



47 
3,067 



480 



36 

969 



NUTRITION 

Meals-on-Wheels Served 
Number of MOW Clients 
On-site Lunches Served 
Number of Lunch Site Attendees 

SOCIAL & RECREATION 

Supper Club Attendees 
Number of Special Events 
Total Number Bingo Games 
Total bingo Attendees 

MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION 

Number of Miles Driven 
Number of Rides 
Number of Riders 
Number of Drivers 



11,120 

44 

6,140 



25 

14 

46 

4,140 



4,900 
58 
28 
18 



14,680 

74 

9,123 



25 

13 

45 

3,669 



6,851 

307 

92 

18 



13,072 

99 

6,009 



30 

15 

47 

3,272 



7,917 

500 

102 

18 



13.092 

120 

10.400 

1,034 



90 

10 

47 

3.024 



8,000 

550 

109 

18 



FRIENDLY VISITOR PROGRAM 

Number of Clients 
Number of Visitors 



27 
20 



42 
42 



VOLUNTEER SERVICES 

Number of Hours 

Number of Sr. Center Volunteers 

Value to Senior Center 

TAX VOUCHER PROGRAM 

# Tax Voucher Volunteers 

# Hours Served 
Value to Town Offices 
Value to Senior Center 

Total Value Tax Vouch. Service 

Value All Volunteer Service 



18,624 

191 

$186,200 









$186,240 



14,974 

146 

$179,740 



30 

3,000 

25,000 

5,000 

$30,000 

$209,740 



15,519 
124 

$217,266 



88 

8,800 

123,200 

14,000 

$137,200 

$354,466 



19,079 

241 

267,106 



91 

9,100 

119,320 

23.550 

142,870 

409,976 



ELDERLY HEALTH CLINICS 

Blood Pressure (wkly.) 
Flu Shots (2/yr.) 
Pneumonia Shots 



897 

1,088 

61 



814 

1,312 

32 



801 

731 

41 



739 
136 

n/a 



OUTREACH SERVICES 



Number Clients 
Number of Cases 
Home Visits 
Hospital Visits 
Office Visits 
S.H.I.N.E. 
Other 



124 

149 

90 

67 

93 

100 

178 



280 
425 
87 
60 
116 
147 



353 
409 

92 

4 

125 

62 
272 



469 
507 

99 

5 

120 

80 
300 



Services Provided by Other Agencies 

Elder Services of Merrimack Valley 
Unduplicated Clients 
Proportionate Cost of Services 

Family Serv ices of Greater Lawrence 
Number of Cases 
Number Clients 
Total Contacts 



282 

307.169 



144 

54 

446 



245 
384,792 



97 
28 

450 



452 
356,124 



93 
40 

417 



318 
306,061 



159 

73 

448 



Visiting Nu rses Association 
Total # Clients 



68 



525 



536 



Meals on Wheels | 

140 — 

120 ■ 

co 100 ■ 

g ■ Number of MOW Clients 

** 80 



60 
40 



1994-1995-1996-1997 



Medical Transportation 



600 



■S 400 

2 _ ■ Number of Rides 

"O ■ 

§ „„„ ♦ Number of Riders 

x 200 



0? 



1994 1995 1996 1997 



69 



Tax Voucher Program 



200 



150 
w 

•a 
c 

» 100 

o 

x: 



Total Value Tax Vouch. Ser 



50 



1994-1995-1996-1997 



Value of Volunteer Services 



450 
400 

-8 350 

c 

§ 300 

o 

jE 250 

200 

150 



To the Town of Andover 



1994 1995 1996 1997 



Social & Recreation 



100 
80 
60 
40 
20 



• Supper Club Attendees 
-# Number of Special Events 



1994 1995 1996 1997 



70 



Friendly Visitor Program 



50 


— 


— ----- 


— 







40 








B 




co 30 

c 






■ 




■ Number of Clients 


CO 

H 20 






* 




# Number of Visitors 


10 







□ 


□ 
1996 


1997 







500 
400 



Instructional Classes 

Number of Unduplicated Elders 



V) 

-o 




300 




i_ 




■o 




§ 200 - 


... -»- 


100 -m- 











1994-1995-1995-1997 







Outreach Social Work Services 



500 



400 
if) 


■D 300 

c 

I 

200 



Number Clients 



100 



1994-1995-1996-1997 



71 



TOWN CLERK 

The mission of the Town Clerk 's Office is to uphold the integrity of the Town 's democratic 
process, to maintain and preserve public records, and to act in the best interest of the community 
and the State by providing innovative, efficient, quality service. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES : 

During 1997 the Town Clerk's office completed its computer transition to the State's Voter 
Registration Information System (VRIS) as its main resource for tracking voter registration and 
census information. The office is continuing its training programs on the new systems and in-house 
reporting. 

The office has also reorganized the licensing of dogs in the Town by placing the licenses on- 
line at the counter for easier registration and making the process for renewing the licenses by mail 
convenient for residents. 

This past year the office cataloged records in the vault and reorganized the records for easy 
access. They are working with other departments to reorganize and catalog their records in order 
to develop a Town-wide record index and preservation program. 

DEPARTMENT STATISTICS : 

In January, the Town Census was mailed to 1 1,080 households. The population of the Town 
at the completion of the census was 29,074. 

The year ended with 19,029 registered voters in the Town's precincts as follows: 

Precinct 1 - 2, 1 80 Precinct 3 - 2,221 Precinct 5 - 2,595 Precinct 7 - 2,258 
Precinct 2 - 2,425 Precinct 4 - 2,419 Precinct 6 - 2,454 Precinct 8 - 2,477 



20 
15 
10 



Elections 1997 



I Registered Voters 
I # Voted 




Town Election 



72 



1995 



1996 



1997 



Births Recorded 


340 


365 


312 


Marriages Recorded 


156 


187 


189 


Deaths Recorded 


241 


260 


251 


Dog Licenses Sold 


2,037 


2,022 


2,204 


Fishing and Hunting Licenses Sold 


630 


566 


630 


Business Certificates 


145 


106 


126 


Uniform Commercial Code Filings 


455 


452 


462 


Registered Voters 


2,033 


3,428 


991 


FEES COLLECTED 








Marriage Licenses 


$ 2,400.00 


$ 2,850.00 


$ 2,850.00 


Certified Copies 


9,948.00 


10,265.00 


10,851.00 


Uniform Commercial Code Filings 


5,678.00 


6,258.00 


6,249.32 


Miscellaneous Licenses Income 


11,645.00 


12,365.00 


11,250.00 


Liquor License Income 


98,450.00 


99,930.00 


97,905.00 


Business Certificate Filings 


3,615.00 


2,795.00 


3,045.00 


Miscellaneous Income 


5,403.00 


4,654.81 


5,829.05 


Dog Licenses 


19,099.00 


16,062.00 


17,954.00 


Non-Criminal Violations 


1,100.00 


1,025.00 


1,925.00 


Copy of Public Records 


N/A 


N/A 


105.80 


Fishing and Hunting Licenses 


11.454.00* 


16.013.20** 


13.479.55*** 



TOTAL 



$168,792.00 $172,218.01 $171,443.72 



** 



*** 



$1 1, 1 52 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Game - $302.45 was retained 

by the Town of Andover. 

$15,751.40 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Game - $261.80 was 

retained by the Town of Andover. 

$13,247.75 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Game - $231.80 was 

retained by the Town of Andover. 



SUMMARY OF OFFICE TRANSACTIONS 




1995 MJ 1996 □ 1997 



Dog UOMMi Rtll/Hum Lbenws Busmejs Ort/fcam Ucc F*ig» MM VottrRagmration 



73 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The mission of Community Services is to provide the residents ofAndover a myriad of social, 
educational, cultural and recreational opportunities embracing diversity and accessibility for all. 
Community Services strives to rate the pulse of the community and incorporate ideas into valued 
programs for its citizens now and in the future. 

Community Services offers year round recreational, enrichment and cultural programs for 
residents of all ages. The majority of the programs are held at the public schools, Recreation Park, 
Pomps Pond, The Park, Senior Center, Greater Lawrence Regional, Vocational, Technical High 
School and other in-town facilities. Community Services continues to transfuse residents' ideas into 
valued programs. A vigorous departmental effort continually improves service to our community. 
Healthy enrollment is attributed to a repertoire of community-based instructors, streamlined 
registration including fax, VIS A/MasterCard, overnight mailbox and increased identification with the 
DCS booklet publication. Enrollments have increased this year in the children's and youth 
programming categories. 

A new Recreation Coordinator, Kim Stamas, came onboard this year and brought new 
programs into the department's offerings including rope skipping, junior weight training, children's 
summer golf, basketball clinic and vacation programs as well as all new soccer and adventure camps. 
Pomps Pond hours were also increased to allow early evening swimming for residents. 

Golf, basketball, fencing, ballet & tap, baseball and soccer were the most popular children's 
programs. Summer programs were well attended with most of the sessions being filled to capacity 
in the All Day Discovery, Shee-Hee & Shaw-Knee and Club For All specialty programs. Top adult 
picks are yoga, golf, cooking, eco-tracking, family science and Internet classes. 

Andover Youth Services has continued to create and implement new programs. A clothing 
drive netted over 6,000 lbs of clothing to benefit neighboring cities and an Indian Reservation in 
South Dakota. The snowboard club trips were filled to capacity and the summer program involved 
1,000 young people in a variety of outings, services, and groups. Exclusive trips for middle school 
girls were offered after a survey indicated a request for a broader scope of activities geared towards 
their specific interests. Andover' s first lacrosse teams, an under- 12 team and under- 14 team, were 
entered in the competitive Mass Bay Youth Lacrosse League. The U-12 team finished the season with 
a 4-4 record and the U-14 finished perfectly 0-9 in the season and 2-0 in the post season tournament. 
Students filmed, edited and submitted their own amateur films for the l rt ever Homegrown Film 
Festival. A community service component to the summer program concentrated on the beautification 
of Andover' s community paths. With the help of AYS, a storm damaged trail in the Ballardvale area 
was cleared and a new trail was blazed near Route 133. After-school programs for middle school 
students consisted of Ultimate Frisbee, rock climbing and a shopping madness trip; while during in- 
school hours AYS was involved with a leadership class at West Middle and the physical education 
element of the High Schools' alternative education program. The Friends ofAndover, an organization 
of adults dedicated to connecting youth to one another was formed in 1996. Working with and as 
advocates for the Andover Youth Council and Andover Youth Services they have raised funds 
exclusively for the AYS through a dance and a donation drive. The Friends of Andover Youth 

74 



acquired a fifteen-passenger van for program transportation at the Fall 1 996 Special Town Meeting. 
Throughout 1997, the van proved invaluable for every program and aspect of AYS programming. 

A new look to the program booklet was developed including new cover design and page set 
up making the document much easier for residents to read. The efforts by the Department were 
rewarded when the LERN organization who tracks trends in lifelong learning nationwide recognized 
the Fall program booklet as among five of the country's top programs. The Fall booklet received 47 
gold stars out of a possible 50. Improvements continue into the next year. 

The revolving account continues to assist the Department in the ability to sponsor a variety 
of activities. School vacation, Children's Studio for the Arts, children's golf and literacy programs 
are examples of programs that were funded through the this account. The account has also allowed 
the DCS to run trips to Ireland, Atlantic City, and all Andover Youth Services programs. 

Programs developed in conjunction with other agencies included Memorial Hall Library, 
Kaplan, The French and Spanish Saturday School, and the Fleet Center. Seven Tax Voucher 
volunteers worked in the DCS office to assist with registration, general office duties and after school 
and evening programming. 

Improvements to the Shawsheen Upper and Lower Fields and Recreation Park were 
underway with funds acquired from Annual Town Meeting. Improvements to the Shawsheen Fields 
included upgrading the track and soccer field, while improvements to the Recreation Park included 
upgrading the tennis courts, work to the multipurpose pad, and road repaving and lining for parking 
at both the park and at Pomps Pond. 

The Department of Community Services and Andover Youth Services looks forward to 
continuing to provide citizens of all ages with quality social, cultural, educational and recreational 
opportunities in the new year ahead. 



75 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 



Class Revenues 



$300,000 




1996 1997 



Program Revenues 



250.000 



200.000 



150.000 



100,000 



50.000 




1994 



1995 



1996 



1997 



Class Participants 



6000 



5000 



4000 



3000 



2000 



1000 




1994 



1995 



1996 



1997 



76 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE: 
Tina B. Cirdwood, Chairman 
Eric J. Nadworny, Secretary 
David A. Birnbach 
Frank M. Eccles 
Timothy M. McCarron 



ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, Massachusetts 01 81 
(978) 623-8501 
FAX (978) 623-8505 



RICHARD E. NEAL 
Superintendent of Schools 



ANNUAL REPORT 

1997 

Andover School Department 



During 1997, student population in the Andover Public Schools continued to 
rise with the total student count on October 1st standing at 5628, some 127 higher 
than reported on the previous October 1st. The populations at the middle and high 
schools showed the most significant gains with the high school increasing from 1319 
to 1404 and the middle schools growing to 1408 from the previous 1364. These 
students, along with the more than 600 professional and support personnel, 
continued to be housed in one 9-12 high school, two middle schools of grades 6-8, 
four K-5 elementary schools, and one K-2 Primary Controlled Magnet School. The five 
elected School Committee members who establish the policy of the school system 
meet at least twice monthly. The FY '98 appropriation of $ 31 ,189,216 allowed the 
school department to continue to maintain its basic educational program while 
continuing to move the school system forward in several areas as described below. 
The professional staff continued to provide a very high quality educational experience 
to all of the students of the Andover Public Schools. 

The comprehensive construction project at Andover High School continued to 
move slowly toward completion. With all of the new construction on line, renovations 
of the existing space moved forward. With several "phases" of this reconstruction now 
completed and in use, only the final phase remains. It is anticipated that this will be 
completed in March, 1998. The eagerly awaited reopening of the Collins Center is 
also scheduled for late winter of 1998. 

Meanwhile, plans for the expansion of the school facilities to accommodate not 
only the current expanded populations at the elementary and middle school levels but 
the growth anticipated over the next fifteen years continue to be developed. In 
February a Space Needs Advisory Committee consisting of parents, teachers, 
administrators, and community representatives, following two public forums, 
presented their final report to the School Committee. Their report indicated that every 



77 



elementary school and both middle schools currently have populations which exceed 
the intended capacities of their buildings. The School Committee, after considering 
the input of the Space Needs Advisory Committee, voted to move forward with the 
construction of a new middle school and to change the grade configuration of the 
elementary and middle schools to K-4, and 5-8 respectively. This done, funding for 
the development of preliminary plans for this new school were sought and approved 
at the 1997 Annual Town Meeting. These preliminary plans are due to be completed 
in February, 1998. 

School Committee and Central Administration 

Following the annual election in March, the Andover School Committee 
welcomed Mr. Frank Eccles and Mr. Timothy McCarron as new members. This was 
the first election to the Committee for each. At its first meeting following the election, 
Mrs. Tina Girdwood was re-elected as Chairperson and Mr. Eric Nadworny was 
elected as Secretary of the Committee. As usual, one of the Committee's first tasks, 
along with the Administration, was to develop objectives for the 1997-98 school year 
and to articulate goals to address the four main objectives. These are as follows: 

Objective 1 : Provide a K-12 curriculum that is responsive to varying student needs at all levels of instruction 
and which maximizes intellectual development in the areas of basic skill mastery, technology, and growth of 
fundamental knowledge. 

Goal 1 : Continue the strategic planning process at Andover High School to develop Action Plans for 
restructuring the High School in the areas of school organization, curriculum, and teaching. 
Goal 2: Strengthen the teacher evaluation process by implementing the "Principles of Effective 

Teaching" 
Goal 3: Develop an assessment model K-8 to monitor and measure the implementation of the 

benchmarks in each subject area. 
Goal 4: Develop the High School course standards and benchmarks in the major disciplines. 
Goal 5: Review primary math and middle school algebra programs with respect to grade level 

benchmarks. 
Goal 6: Review K-12 social studies curriculum in accordance with Massachusetts Frameworks. 

Objective 2: Provide all students the opportunity to maximize their potential in an atmosphere conducive to 
their social, emotional, and physical development. All students shall be challenged at their level of 
accomplishment and will be provided opportunities for individual progress, achievement, and recognition. 

Goal 1 : Implement an alternative high school program for students unable to succeed in the 
traditional high school setting. 

Goal 2: Explore possible local alternatives to special education outside placements. 

Goal 3: Implement and evaluate the new elementary school report card system. 

Objective 3: Provide an educational service delivery system which establishes priorities, identifies the 
resources needed to meet these priorities in a cost effective manner, and considers the impact on the 
educational environment (e.g., class size, space, noise and disruption factors, etc.) 

Goal 1 : In conjunction with the Town and School Building Committee, work to bring the High School 

project to completion, dealing with the effects of construction in an optimum way. 
Goal 2: Update the 5-year financial plan and the 5-year CIP with priorities clearly defined. 
Goal 3: Complete the preliminary design phase for a new 5-8 middle school. 

2 

78 



Goal 4: Develop plans to provide short-term solutions to address elementary school overcrowding. 
Goal 5: Establish technology networks at each of the schools. 

Objective 4: Enhance community confidence in the School System and its objectives. 

Goal 1 : Develop an informational TV series to inform community of system initiatives. 
Goal 2: Develop K-8 grade level curriculum overviews and benchmark documents. 
Goal 3: Develop a printed system profile brochure. 

During this past year, several initiatives were started or continued which are 
worthy of note. Included in these are the expansion of a new language arts and 
reading program at the elementary level to grades 4 & 5; the development of 
benchmarks or performance standards for each subject at each grade and the start of 
the development of an assessment system to measure each student against these 
standards; the implementation of the "Principles of Effective Teaching" in the teacher 
evaluation system; a new "block schedule" at Andover High School which provides for 
teaching and learning in extended periods; the development of an "Alternative High 
School Program" in conjunction and collaboration with the North Andover School 
Department; the development of a local special education alternative placement 
program; the automation of all school media centers; and the introduction of a revised 
elementary school report card system. 

With concerns raised over the air quality at the Bancroft School and with the 
student population exceeding the capacity of the building, plans were developed to 
add four "portable" classrooms to the school. These stand alone classrooms were 
delivered to the site in the late fall and were ready for occupancy by four fourth grade 
classes at the end of December. Plans were also developed to add two "portable 
classrooms" to the Sanborn School next year. 

Several residents of Andover developed plans for a Charter School for the 
Town. This school, if approved by the Department of Education and the State Board of 
Education, would ultimately serve 400 students in grades 5-8. The decision by the 
state agencies is due in late February, 1998. 

In September, Mr. Richard Neal, Superintendent of Schools, notified the School 
Committee of his intent to retire from public education on June 30, 1998, following 40 
years of public education service. With this notice, the School Committee began to 
develop a timeline for the search for and appointment of a successor. The timeline 
outlined a process which included citizens, staff, parents, and administrators in 
evaluating applications and interviewing candidates. The School Committee intends 
to appoint a new superintendent in late February, 1998, with this person beginning 
work on July 1, 1998. 



79 



DEPARTMENTAL HIGHLIGHTS 

Business Office 

The primary responsibilities of the Business Office are preparation and 
oversight of the Annual School Budget. This includes such things as monitoring 
expenditures, administering the financial provisions of labor contracts, purchasing, 
preparation of a five year financial forecast and tracking grant awards and 
disbursements. In addition to financial oversight, the Business Office is responsible 
for facilities management, data processing, student transportation and food services. 

The Business Office is also engaged in several projects of note: 

1. Upgrading the technological capabilities of the Business Office. New 
computers and printers were purchased in preparation for installing new financial 
management software and network connectivity. The selection and installation of new 
software is expected in the spring of 1 998. 

2. Elementary and Middle School Facilities Expansion. An architectural firm 
was hired in July to assist the School Department in the site selection for a new 5-8 
middle school and to prepare a preliminary design of the new school. The Business 
Office provided valuable data to the architect and worked closely with the School 
Committee, the Superintendent of Schools and town personnel on this project. 

3. Building Maintenance. A five year capital and extraordinary maintenance 
plan is updated, annually. In conjunction with the Department of Municipal 
Maintenance, priorities are set and cost estimates established. Major items are 
included annually as part of the town's Capital Improvement Plan. 

4. Upgrading Student Management Software. The data processing adjunct of 
the Business Office coordinated the review and evaluation of new student 
management software. All building principals and guidance personnel were involved. 
New software was installed at the high school in February. 

Andover High School 

1. Construction 

• The cafeteria was completed for the opening of school. This allowed for 
students to have a more appropriate arrangement of tables and chairs due to 
the stairs being removed. 

• The administration and guidance areas were opened. Each guidance 
counselor now has their own office. The counseling department also received 
their own departmental conference room. 



80 



I 
1 
I 

! 

I 



• The new computer lab and language lab became available to faculty and 
students. The labs are being used very effectively to support work being done 
in these disciplines. 

• The work continues and it is expected that the final phase will be completed in 
the Spring of 1998. 

2. School/Business Partnership 

• This program continues to grow. There are 50 students presently in the 
program being mentored by area business people. 

• Two $1000 scholarships were given to deserving students. 

3. Schedule Design 

• This September we moved to an alternative schedule design. The 
configuration provides for longer class periods and fewer transitions in a day. 
The schedule continues to be refined and modified to best meet the needs of 
students. 

4. Alternative Program 

• This year we entered into a collaborative effort with North Andover High School 
to provide a regular education alternative high school. The program has 
provided an opportunity for those students who have not been able to achieve 
success in the traditional high school setting. 

5. Curriculum 

• The staff, under the direction of the newly created positions of Program 
Advisors, is continuing to address the State curriculum frameworks and the 
APS benchmarks as they work on defining and re-aligning our curriculum 

• A Strategic Plan, addressing the areas of Curricula, Teaching and Organization 
will be completed in early 1998. 

• A number of new technology courses were initiated utilizing our Mac and PC 
labs. 

Doherty Middle School 

• During the past year the Doherty Middle School sought to enhance parental 
involvement in the school by involving parents in the life of the school in the 
following ways: 

• Parent Advisory Council 

• PAC Events 

• Doherty's School Council 

• Homework Hangout 

• Interviewing Committees 



81 



• Field Trips 

• Guest Classroom Speakers 

• Homework Support 

• Book Fairs 

• Fundraising 

• Extra-Curricular Clubs 

• Enrichment Classes 

• Teacher Appreciation Events 

• Media Center Assistants 

• Career Fair 

• School-Wide Committees 

• In keeping with the middle school emphasis on teams, a special education 
teacher has been assigned to each of our large teacher teams. Under this 
model, the special education teacher works with the other teachers on the 
team during the students' academic block. Also, the special education teacher 
has a homeroom and attends the daily team meetings. 

• A new course called Creative Expression was introduced for all students which 
focuses on performance-based oral language skills such as public speaking 
and drama. 

West Middle School 

• Two teams of students representing Andover West Middle School won highest 
honors in the WordMasters Challenge - a national language arts competition 
entered by over 200,000 students annually. 

• A West Middle School Grade 6 Team received two grants totaling over $2000 to 
support their school-to-career Greenhouse Project. 

• Through support and fund raising efforts of the Andover Special Needs PAC, 
West Middle School students were trained in disability awareness and 
puppeteering. The "Kids on the Block" puppets will be used to conduct drama 
presentations at local elementary schools on topics related to disability 
awareness. 

• PictureTel, Inc., an Andover technology company, donated equipment to WMS 
in order to conduct an interactive distance learning project. 

• The grade 7 & 8 chorus participated in the Faneuil Hall Holiday Festival. 



82 



• West Middle School students created picture books and mailed supplies to 
children in Vietnam. 

• Fifteen staff members engaged in a reflective study group focusing on 
"Teaching for Understanding". 

Bancroft Elementary School 

• Bancroft received a $17,085 Lighthouse Technology Award. They will use 
Alpha-Smart Pros in the area of writing, specifically composition. 

• Air quality and over-crowding were major priorities for the year. The following 
have been accomplished: 

• New HVAC systems have been installed on the first floor 

• Extensive cleaning was completed 

• Four new modular classrooms were set up and are now populated with one 
hundred fourth grade students. 

• New science lab opened for grade five students. 
Henry C. Sanborn School 

• Due to population growth, art and music rooms used as regular classrooms 

• New technology lab opened with thirty MAC computers. 

• School-wide curriculum stressed the school values of respect, responsibility, 
resourcefulness and reflection through the theme Growing Gardens.. .Growing 
Minds. 

• State testing program results showed third graders at the 79th percentile 
nationally with 43% of the students at the advanced reader level, 51% at the 
proficient reader level, and 6% (4) at the basic reading level. 

• Parents continued to play a significant role at the school. Volunteerism 
continued to be extensive with parents sharing in the governance of the school 
through participation on an active school council, through clerical and 
instructional support, and through a myriad of ad hoc committees. 



83 



Shawsheen School 

• Publishing Center established at the school. A team of parents and teachers 
wrote guidelines for publishing student hardbound and spiral bound books. 
Discs containing instructions and templates were distributed to volunteer 
parents who published hundreds of books written by the children. 

• New playground constructed. The outdated wooden equipment was removed 
from the playground and new steel structures were installed. Parents raised 
$16,045 toward the new equipment and provided the labor to install it. 

• School-wide theme is Space Exploration. Children at all levels are learning 
about the planets and will be visited by astronaut Charlie Precourt after he 
returns from the Spaceship Mir. 

South Elementary School 

• School Theme of "We Can Make A World of Difference" incorporated in all 
aspects of school life. School beliefs of respect, responsibility, diversity, and 
lifelong learning were guiding values. 

• Teachers worked together in study groups to research best practices in the 
teaching profession. Study groups focused on gender bias, multi-age looping, 
multiple intelligences, and assessment. 

• 100% of South teachers literate with ClarisWorks. Also, teachers attended 
staff development programs in the following technologies: scanner, Digital 
camera, Apple presentation, HyperStudio, and the One Computer Classroom. 

• Odyssey of the Mind team achieved first place in the World Competition. 

• Fourth & fifth grade Math Olympiad Team recognized for meritorious effort. 

• Business partnerships continued with Genetics Institute, Eisai Research 
Institute, and Digital Corporation. 

West Elementary School 

• Active Student Council focused its energy on school and community service 
projects. Activities such as People's Pantry, Walk For Hunger, and Earth Day 
were undertaken. 



84 



• Over 50 fourth and fifth graders participated in the Math Olympiad. The fifth 
grade team finished in the top 10% in the world. 

• Over 200 children participated in 1 1 different before school enrichment 
classes run by parents. 

• All parents of grade 1, 2, and 3 students invited to have lunch and recess with 
their child at the school. Over 460 parents attended. 

• Twenty-one high school students provide community service to students and 
teachers at West Elementary School. 

• The two open spaces in West Elementary School were made into 20 closed 
classrooms with the installation of walls. 

Physical Education Department 

• High School program reorganized to provide students more options. Project 
Challenge and at least one Individualized Personal Fitness/Wellness course 
required. 

• Approximately eighty-five percent of students scored above the national 
average on the "Presidents Challenge" physical fitness test. 

• Renovations to the Dunn Gymnasium and construction of the new 
fitness/wellness room completed. 

• Andover Physical Education Department invited to present at the annual 
MAHPERD conference. 

Health Education 

• Curriculum benchmarks concurrent with the State Curriculum Framework 
Learning Standards were defined for Grades K-9 and 11/12 Health Education 
Programs. 

• Center for Disease Control Youth Risk Behavior Survey administered to all 
Middle and High School Students with parental permission. 

• Thirty high school peer leaders trained to conduct one hour workshops for all 
Middle School Students on harassment prevention. 



Parent-to-Parent offered S.T.E.P. (Systematic Training for Effective Parenting) 
to over two hundred Andover parents. 

In response to student and parent concerns, the problem of eating disorders 
was given special focus. 



Fine Arts 



• Three after school art clubs formed - two at Andover High School and one at 
Doherty Middle School. 

• K-8 Music, 1-8 Art and 4-12 Choral Curricula have been updated using the 
National Standards and the State Frameworks Guidelines. This includes 
Grades 4 and 8 assessments. 

• Each school created their own individual Fine Arts Festival format. 

• The first Andover High School Shakespeare Drama, "Much Ado About Nothing" 
with original student composed and arranged music was produced with rave 
reviews. 

• Student art work submitted to the Globe met with the following success: 

3 Gold Keys; 2 Silver Keys; 3 Honorable Mentions; one Blue Ribbon; 
One Portfolio Nomination. 



Technology 



• One MAC 5500 computer and 1 LaserWriter printer installed in every 
classroom K-8. 

• Over 3100 cat 5 computer cables and 95% of the electronic of the 3209 cables 
installed and tested. 

• Media One in process of completing the installation of the Institutional CATV 
system (l-loop). 

• Technology Department took control of the Andover Education Channel. 

• Technology curriculum scope and sequence developed, printed, and 
distributed to teachers. 

• Television Studio at AHS reopened. 

10 
86 



• Computerized Music Composition Pilot at Doherty Middle School expanded to 
West Middle School 

Pupil Personnel 

• Programs and Services provided to 656 special needs students. This 
represents 1 1 .6% of Andover's student population compared to the state 
average of 17%. 

• New model introduced at middle schools with a SPED teacher as integral 
member of teaching teams. 

• In conjunction with Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST) began 
intensive program designed to build our capability to provide state of the art 
technology assistance to special needs students. 

• Revised health staffing to provide a licensed nurse (R.N. or L.P.N.) in each 
building on a full time basis. 

• Continued to provide English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction at all 
levels. Forty-five students received services. 

Athletics 

• New Field House at AHS in full operation. First indoor track meet held in 
January. 

• Senior Citizen Voucher program supplies twelve volunteers to work in 
program. 

• Girls' Gymnastics team records third undefeated season in succession. 

• Girls' Basketball team recorded 24-1 record and a trip to the Fleet Center. 

• Boys' Golf team recorded undefeated season and finished 2nd in the state. 

• Director of Athletics received M.S.S.A.D.A. President's Award of Merit. 

• Varsity teams recorded an overall 240-109-16 record (.687%). 



87 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 



ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL 

Construction continued throughout the year with renovations to the classroom wings. New 
administration and guidance offices and career center were ready at the opening of the 1997/98 
school year. The Dunn Gymnasium was available for volleyball and basketball later in the fall. 

The volume of work performed during 1997 was $3.7 million. The contract sum at year end 
was $24.2 million of which $4 million is approved changes. At the close of 1997 the project was 
98.8% complete. 



SOUTH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

The construction contingency balance was transferred to the Sanborn School construction 
contingency. Unencumbered Technology funds were transferred to the High School construction 
contingency. 



SANBORN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Punchlist work was completed during 1997. 

At year end, the contract price was $2,984,728 of which $95,904 (3%) is changes. 



88 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

The Annual Report for fiscal year 1997, covering the period from July 1, 1996 through June 
30, 1997, was accepted and approved at a regularly scheduled meeting of the Greater Lawrence 
Regional Vocational Technical High School District Committee held on November 4, 1997. The 
report is prepared each year in conformity with the terms of the Agreement to Establish a Regional 
School District. Participating communities in the district are the City of Lawrence and the Towns 
of Andover, North Andover and Methuen. 



1994-95 



1995-96 



1996-97 



Enrollment 


1,501 1,384 


1,380 


Andover students 


14 12 


12 


Placement of graduates/employment 


82% 80% 


81% 


Business Firms with 


1,960 2,023 


2,075 


Coop. Work Agreements 






The following courses were offered during the 1996-97 school year: 




Allied Health Technician 


Autobody 




Automotive 


Carpentry 




Clothing 


Cosmetology 




Construction & Building/Painting 


Culinary Arts 




Data Processing 


Distributive Education 




Drafting 


Electrical 




Electronics 


Food Tech. Management/Clothing 


Graphic Communications Technology 


Heavy Equipment 




Industrial Electronics 


Machine Technology 




Major Appliance/ Air Conditioning/ 


Metal Fabrication 




Refrigeration 


Plumbing and Pipefitting 





Small Engine Repair 



89 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June, 1948. The regular meetings of the 
Board of Commissioners are held on the second Thursday of every month at the Stowe Court 
Community Room. Board Members are as follows: 

Ronald Hajj - Chairperson 

Norma Villarrel - Vice Chairman 

Hartley Burnham - Governor's Appointee 

James Cuticchia - Treasurer 

Jason Fox - Asst. Treasurer 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 218 units of state-aided elder/disabled housing, 56 
units of state-aided family housing, 7 leased housing units under the Massachusetts Rental Voucher 
Program, 10 units under the state-aided Alternative Housing Voucher Program and 8 units of 
housing under the Chapter 689 program. In addition, the Authority administers 59 Section 8 
Certificates and 68 Section 8 Vouchers which are federally funded through the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development. 

STATE FUNDED PROGRAMS: Income Limits 

1 person $29,700 4 people $41,600 7 people $51,600 

2 people $33,300 5 people $44,950 8 people $54,900 

3 people $37,450 6 people $48,250 

Apartment turnover 1997: 42 Elder/Disabled units 10 Family units 

Average rent: $234 Elder/Disabled Program $371 Family Program 

FEDERALLY FUNDED PROGRAMS: Section 8 Rent Assistance Income Limits 

1 person $19,550 4 people $27,900 7 people $34,600 

2 people $22,300 5 people $30,150 8 people $36,850 

3 people $25,100 6 people $32,350 

STATE-FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS GRANTS : Implemented 1997 

October, 1997 Underground tank in Memorial Circle $9,000 

November, 1997 Flat roof replacement at Frye Circle $42,000 

November, 1997 Replacement of heating system Memorial Circle $746,300 

JOINT VENTURES : 

Playground installed at Memorial Circle Family property through resident fundraising efforts matched 
by Housing Authority funds. 

FEDERALLY FUNDED GRANTS RECEIVED : 

Section 8 Family Self Sufficiency Program - $42,000 

90 



ANDOVER PRESERVATION COMMISSION 

The Andover Preservation Commission endeavors to fulfill its mission to advise the Town 
concerning the preservation of it historic and archeological resources. 

During 1997 the Commission was active in the following areas: 

Demolition Delay Bylaw 

The Commission heard requests for demolition for twenty-four properties, twenty of which 
were located within the Academy Hill National Register Historic District. Phillips Academy has 
undergone an intensive long range planning effort with respect to its physical plan. Their plan called 
for the removal of structures underutilized, in poor repair or outside the campus perimeter. Seven 
structures were determined by the APC to be historically significant and preferably preserved. A six- 
month delay period was mandated. Demolition of four structures was placed on hold at the time the 
six-month delay was passed because proposals were made to save the structures through alternative 
uses or by moving them. 

Local Historic Districts 

The Ballard Vale Local Historic District Commission continues its work in hearing proposals 
and advising residents about the design of historically sensitive changes to buildings in the district. 
The Commission seeks to place appropriate signage to mark the district's boundaries. Dennis 
Ingram, Chairman, is the Preservation Commission's representative to this Board. 

At the request of the Preservation Commission, the Board of Selectmen voted in July to 
appoint a local historic district study committee for Shawsheen Village. Ray Flynn, a member of the 
APC, is serving as Chairman. The study committee will endeavor to bring a local district bylaw to 
the 1999 Town Meeting if community support warrants it. 



Heritage Education 

The Andover Preservation Awards were held in February at Memorial Hall Library in 
cooperation with the Andover Historical Society. Ten property owners were recognized for their 
outstanding preservation efforts. 



Design Review 

APC and Design Advisory Review member Ann Constantine worked with Inspector of 
Buildings Kaija Gilmore and other DAG members to insure that new signage in downtown Andover 
is appropriate. The Commission appreciates Ann's effort to work constructively with business 
owners on design issues, particularly with regard to historic structures. 



91 



Other Projects 

• 66 Poor Street, 1830 Joseph Poor House: The Zoning Board of Appeals approved a new 
proposal for property. The APC worked with the owner on a design to preserve the original 
house while allowing construction of detached condominiums on the site. A preservation 
restriction is being negotiated. 

• West Parish Cemetery Chapel: Massachusetts Historical Commission awarded the West 
Parish Garden Cemetery Committee a matching grant of $90,000 for restoration of the 
chapel. James Batchelder is this commission's representative to the WPGC Committee. 

• Stonewalls: The Commission will work with the Planning Board to ensure historic stonewalls 
are preserved when threatened by development. 

• Stevens Street/North Main Street: This area continues to be threatened by business 
development. The APC has voiced strong concerns about the possible loss of 19 th century 
structures in the Andover Village Industrial National Register Historic District along North 
Main Street which will impact the remaining residential character of the street. 

• Cochran Chapel: The Commission voted to support Phillips Academy's proposal to renovate 
the chapel and make it handicapped accessible. 

339-345 North Main Street: Plans in progress to restore masonry. 

• 4-6 Haverhill Street: Plans in progress to restore windows and doorway of former Shawsheen 
Laundry Building. 

• 350 th Committee: Norma Gammon reported that some of the remaining funds from the 
celebration would be used to provide signage marking the Town's entrances. 

Steven W. Kearn 

The Commission was greatly saddened by the untimely death of member Steven Kearn in 
March of 1997. Steven had served on this board since 1992. He was an associate member of the 
West Parish Garden Cemetery Commission and served as project manager for the successful 
restoration of the Monumental Arch that leads into the cemetery. He gave many hours working on 
local preservation awards given each year to citizens of Andover by this commission and the Andover 
Historical Society. Steven also served on the 350 th Committee. We valued his commitment as a 
member, his knowledge of the Town, its history and architectural heritage. 



Karen M. Herman, Chairwoman 
Andover Preservation Commission 



92 



BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

The purpose of the Commission is to ensure that changes and additions are harmonious to the 
District and to prevent changes that might detract from the aesthetic and historic values of the 
District. 

The Ballard Vale Historic Commission completed its second year conducting twelve regular 
meetings and seven public hearings as well as several "on-site" meetings for a variety of applications. 

There were fifteen applications (two commercial/thirteen residential) submitted to the 
Commission during the year. The applications ranged from new building construction/additions to 
repair and renovation of existing buildings. 

The Commission is staffed by seven residents of the District and an architect who also serves 
on the Andover Preservation Commission. We would like to thank Richard Bowen and Helene 
Roberts, whose terms expired during the last year, and Charles Murnane, Jr., who resigned due to 
additional educational commitments, for their many hours of service to the Commission over the last 
several years. In August of this year, Bruce Taylor and Chris Huntress were appointed by the Board 
of Selectmen to serve as alternate members on the Commission. 

Looking toward the coming year, the Commission is working on an informational brochure 
which explains the role and responsibilities of the Commission and the purpose of the Historic 
District. We are also working with the Andover Preservation Commission and the Andover Patriotic 
Committee to make several improvements to the Ballard Vale Commons as well as the development 
of a street signage program for the District. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Dennis Ingram, Chairperson 
Diane Derby, Vice Chairperson 
Kevin Byrne, Secretary 
Sherron Heller 
Perry Raffi 
Ron Abraham 
Chris Huntress 
Bruce Taylor 



93 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long-time resident of Andover, 
bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a 
permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle 
stipulated in her will that the income from this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement 
of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, comfort 
or support on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance 
with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred to the Trustees by private charitable 
groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on twenty-six (26) cases, disbursing 
$32,270.71 on approved cases. Only the income of the Fund is available. The principal of 
$345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income is invested under the direction of the 
Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the 
Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 1996 $151,521.07 

Receipts - 1997 27.115.24 

$178,636.31 
Disbursements - 1997 32.270.71 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 3 1, 1997 $146,365.60 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 

The John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 Annual 
Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to 
purchase wood or coal. In 1995 the trust documents were modified by the Probate Court of 
Massachusetts to permit the use of all types of fuel for heating, cooking or electrical purposes. Three 
Trustees, chosen on a staggered basis, by vote at the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 
The Trustees approved two applications in the amount of $500.05 during the year. 



Balance on hand 6/30/96 $37,001.60 

Income -FY-1997 2,464.82 

Expenditures - FY- 1 997 500.05 

Balance as of 6/30/97 $38,966.37 



94 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31,1997 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 
SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 



1/1/97 PRINCIPAL FUND 12/31/97 



CASH/MONEY MARKET FUND $0.00 -GAIN/(LOSS) - SALE OF SECURITIES $77,697.99 CASH/MONEY MARKET FUND $4,161.88 

SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 169,388.62 -BROKERAGE FEES/TAX (1,990.38) SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 249,160.23 

-INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEES (1 ,798.27) 

-REINVEST MUTUAL FD. CAP GAINS 8,162.06 

-TRANSFERS FROM RESERVE FUND 1 ,862.09 



$169,388.62 INCREASE $83,933.49 $253,322.11 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 

(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNT) 
INCOME 



CASH IN BANK-SAVINGS $5,333.98 DIVIDENDS RECEIVED $3,084.23 CASH IN BANK-SAVINGS $5,654.18 

CASH IN BANK-CHECKING 3,002.72 INTEREST RECEIVED-BONDS/NOTES 6.768.78 CASH IN BANK-CHECKING 2,712.98 

CASH/MONEY MARKET FUND 2,542.75 INTEREST RECEIVED-OTHER 566.33 CASH/MONEY MARKET FUND 181.36 



$10,879.45 INCOME TOTAL $10,419.34 $8,548.52 

EXPENSES 



ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL PROJECTS $10,099.1 1 
MISC.OPERATING EXPENSES 789.07 



EXPENSE TOTAL $10,888.18 



NET INCOME ($468.84) 
TRANSFERS TO PRINCIPAL: 

-10% OF INCOME (1/1-12/31/97) 1,042.00 

-UNEXPENDED SCHOOL PROJ. FUNDS 726.37 (7/1/96 - 6/30/97) 

-ADD'L FUNDS INVESTED 93.72 



DECREASE ($2,330.93) 



$180,268.07 TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS $261 ,870.63 



95 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

FUNDS ANALYSIS AS OF DECEMBER 31, I997 
CAPITAL ACCOUNT 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



BOOK VALUE 



MARKET VALUE 
OVER/(UNDER) 
MARKET VALUE BOOK VALUE 



CASH 

CASH/MONEY MARKET FUND 

MUTUAL FUNDS 

2664.449 Shs. Delaware Decater Income Fund, CI B 
4215.852 Shs. Federated High Income Bond Fund.CI B 
4238.866 Shs. Franklin Utilities Fund.CI II 
665.779 Shs. Seligman Comm. & Info Fund.CI B 

TOTAL MUTAL FUNDS 

SECURITIES - BONDS/NOTES 



$15,000 
$15,000 
$15,000 
$10,000 
$10,000 
$20,000 



U.S.TREASURY NOTE,8.125%,DUE 2/15/98 
U.S.TREASURY NOTE,7.125%,DUE 10/15/98 
U.S.TREASURY NOTE,6.375%,DUE 8/15/02 
PEPSICO INC. NOTE,6.250%,DUE 9/1/99 
IBM NOTE,7.250%,DUE 11/1/02 
WACHOVIA CORP.NOTE,6.375%,DUE 4/15/03 

TOTAL BONDS/NOTES 



TOTAL SECURITIES 



TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 



$4,161.88 


$4,161.88 


$0.00 


57,077.00 
50,000.00 
43,552.87 
15,000.00 


53,448.85 
50,295.11 
47,136.19 
14,607.19 


(3,628.15) 
295.11 
3,583.32 
(392.81) 


$165,629.87 

14,680.58 
14,878.13 
14,412.90 
9,740.00 
9,874.35 
19,944.40 


$165,487.34 

15,042.15 
15,168.75 
15,389.10 
10,053.10 
10,337.50 
20,176.00 


($142.53) 

361.57 
290.62 
976.20 
313.10 
463.15 
231.60 


$83,530.36 


$86,166.60 


$2,636.24 


$249,160.23 


$251,653.94 


$2,493.71 



RESERVE FUND 



ANDOVER BANK CD ACCOUNT 
MONEY MARKET CASH FUND 



TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



CASH FUND 



CHECKING ACCOUNT - BAYBANK 

TOTAL FUNDS 



$253,322.11 



$5,654.18 
181.36 

$5,835.54 



$2,712.98 
$261,870.63 



$255,815.82 



INCREASE IN MARKET VALUE FROM 1/1/97 



$5,835.54 

$2,712.98 

$264,364.34 

$33,185.59 



$2,493.71 



$0.00 

$0.00 
$2,493.71 



96 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING: DECEMBER 31 ,1997 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 







ADDITIONS 


CURRENT 










BALANCE 


TO 


YEAR 


SUB 


LESS 


BALANCE 




1/1/97 


PRINCIPAL 


NET INCOME 


TOTAL 


AWARDS 


12/31/97 


H.W.& M.P.BARNARD 


$2,088.69 




$363.67 


$2,452.36 


$0.00 


$2,452.36 


J.W.BARNARD 


7,248.41 




1,294.77 


8,543.18 


200.00 


8,343.18 


ALICE M.BELL 


1.117.35 




200.15 


1,317.50 


45.00 


1,272.50 


THOMAS BLACK 


15,586.70 




1,996.25 


17,582.95 


800.00 


16,782.95 


EDNAG.CHAPIN 


2,552.89 




45721 


3,010.10 


100.00 


2,910.10 


FRED W.DOYLE 


11,092.26 




1,969.42 


13,061.68 


500.00 


12,561.68 


WARREN F.DRAPER 


1,656.55 




296.45 


1,953.00 


70.00 


1,883.00 


WILLIAM G.GOLDSMITH 


2,202.88 




39520 


2,598.08 


0.00 


2.598.08 


ELIZABETH T.GUTTERSON 


1.121.00 




206.65 


1,327.65 


45.00 


1,282.65 


MYRON E.GUTTERSON 


1,212.53 




217.31 


1,429.84 


0.00 


1,429.84 


ANDOVER GRANGE 


2,753.45 




493.84 


3.247.29 


100.00 


3,14729 


NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 


20.320.84 




1,144.32 


21,465.16 


1,000.00 


20,465.16 


MARGARET F. HINCHCLIFFE 


33,086.85 




5,929.70 


39,016.55 


1,500.00 


37,516.55 


PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 


10,543.33 




1,877.55 


12,420.88 


440.00 


11,980.88 


ANDOVER SERVICEMEN 


28,620.64 




5,128.19 


33.748.83 


1,500.00 


32,248.83 


HENRY WYATT 


5,070.98 


1,987.40 -A) 


983.25 


8,041.63 


500.00 


7,541.63 


A.F.B. & W A TROW 


77.641.51 


21.20 -B) 


7,827.35 


85,490.06 


0.00 


85,490.06 



$223,916.86 $2,008.60 $30,78128 



$256,706.74 



$6,800.00 



$249,906.74 



SUMMARY-INCOME/(EXPENSE) 

INTEREST INCOME 

DIVIDEND INCOME 

GAIN (LOSS) ON SALE OF SECURITES 

BROKERAGE FEES/TAXES 

INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEES 

NET INCOME 



$7,511.68 
12,508.08 
12,487.70 
(683.72) 
(1,042.46) 

$30,78128 



(A- Add'l funds contributed by Town Employees- 8/97 
(B- Final adj.after taxes of funds from Boston Safe-5/97 



FUNDS HELD 



CASH - CHECKING ACCT./TROW FUND 

ANDOVER BANK CD'S (2) 

BROKER CASH/ MONEY MARKET FUNDS 

DELAWARE DECATUR INCOME FUND 

TEMPLETON GROWTH FUND 

PIONEER CASH RESERVES/TROW FUND 

PIONEER MUTUAL FUNDS/TROW FUND 

$25,000 U.S.TREASURY NOTE,625%,4/30/01 

$5,000 U.S.TREASURY NOTE. 5. 125%, 3/31/98 

$10,000 U.S.TREASURY NOTE,6.125%,7/31/00 

$5,000 U.S.TREASURY NOTE.6.375%,8/15/02 

$20,000 U.S.TREASURY NOTE,625%2/15/03 

$5,000 IBM NOTE,7250%,1 1/1/02 

$5,000 PEPSICO INC. NOTE,6250%,9/1/99 

TOTAL 



MARKET 


BOOK 


VALUE 


VALUE 


$1,196.81 


$1,196.81 


2822322 


2822322 


18,806.47 


18.806 47 


24,055.49 


25.960 85 


18,086.11 


1824426 


4,393.81 


4.39381 


79,350.42 


79.899 44 


25,390.75 


24.96925 


4.996.90 


4.985 85 


10.100.00 


9.990 63 


5,129.70 


4.804 30 


20,45620 


18.600 00 


5,168.75 


4.961 as 


5,026.55 


4.870 00 


$250,381.18 


$249,906 74 



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■ 



Town of Andover, Massachusetts 

Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 

and Changes in Fund Balances 

All Governmental Fund Types and Expendable Trust Funds 

June 30. 1997 



Fiduciary 





Governmental Fund Type 




Proprietary Fund Type 


Fund Type 


Total 






Capital 


Special 


Water 


Sewer 


Expendable 


(Memorandum 




General 


Projects 


Revenue 


Enterprise 


Enterprise 


Trust 


Only) 


Revenues: 
















Real Estate 


49,582.920.56 












49,582,920.56 


Personal Property 


1,329.773.10 












1.329,773.10 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


3,173,023.71 












3,173,023.71 


Intergovernmental 


5,965,867.80 












5,965,867.80 


Other Excise 


671.184.00 












671,184.00 


Penalties and Interest 


331,764.56 












331,764.56 


Payments in Lieu of Taxes 


2.016.00 












2,016.00 


Charges for Services - Water 








5.232,691.98 






5.232,891.98 


Charges for Services - Sewer 










2.045,913.41 




2,045.913.41 


Fees 


266,884.57 












266,884.57 


DMM Facilities Rental 


68.231.50 












68,231.50 


Departmental Revenue - Schools 


49,073.78 




1,678,792.98 








1,727,866.76 


Departmental Revenue • Libraries 


134,910.48 












134,910.48 


Departmental Revenue - Cemeteries 


27,025.00 












27,025.00 


Departmental Revenue- Recreation 


348,812.26 












348.812.26 


Departmental Revenue- Ambulance 


384,119.38 












384,119.38 


Other Departmental Revenue 


202.944.88 


13,636.15 


2,788,945.04 








3,005,526.07 


Licenses and Permits 


1,068,719.06 












1,068,719.06 


Special Assessments 


1,627.35 






3,128.55 


87,025.72 




91.781.62 


Fines and Forfeits 


266.027.50 












266,027.50 


Investment Income 


1.429.491.49 










344,074.24 


1,773.565.73 


Other 


568,344.55 










1,685,528.14 


2,253.872.69 


Total Revenues 


65,872,761.53 


13,636.15 


4.467.738.02 


5.236,020.53 


2.132.939.13 


2,029.602.38 


79.752.697.74 


Expenditures 
















General Government 


2.189,012.48 


156.579.32 


1.192.792.01 








3.538.383.81 


Municipal Maintenance 


4,274.823.16 




9,389.25 








4.284.212.41 


Public Safety 


8,680.597.95 


6,626.96 


784.599.85 








9.471,824.76 


Public Works 


3.920,293.46 


1,804,725.36 




2,219,663.39 


1,323.113.92 




9,267,796.13 


Library 


1,729.630.68 


247,879.99 


23.885.95 








2,001.396 62 


School 


29.252,553.25 


7.585.349.60 


1.610,323.74 








38,448,226.59 


GLRVTHS 














0.00 


Fixed 
















Insurance 














0.00 


Debt Service 


5,938.522.68 






2.129,314.32 


498.209.90 




8.566.046.90 


Retirement 


2,737,443.48 












2,737.44348 


State & County Assessments 


985,691.79 












985.691.79 


Unclassified 












5.269,127.35 


5,269.127.35 




1,991.335.46 
61,699.904.39 


82,973.50 
9,884,134.73 


12.000.00 
3,632,990.80 








2,086.308 96 


Total Expenditures 


4,348,977.71 


1,821,323.82 


5,269,127.35 


86.656.458.80 


Other Financing Sources (Uses) 


(3,385,000.00) 












(3.385.000.00) 


Transfers 


990.619.00 




(84,806.00) 


(921,083.73) 


(196,158.68) 


3,385,000.00 


3,173.570 59 


Debt Activity 




9,500,000.00 


540,000.00 








10.040,000 00 


Other 


118.796.07 


258,785.58 


17,417.02 






2.000.00 


396.998 67 
000 


Total Other Financing 














Sources (Uses) 


(2,275,584.93) 


9,758,785.58 


472,611.02 


(921,083.73) 


(196,158.68) 


3,387,000.00 


10.225.569 26 


Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues over 
















(Under) expenditures and other 
















Financing Sources (Uses) 


1,897,272.21 


(111,713.00) 


1.307.358.24 


(34,040.91) 


115.456.63 


147,475.03 


3.321.808 20 


Fund Balance July 1, 1996 


6.415,704.14 


6,734,457.58 


(176.747.42) 


614,087.91 


7.297.55 


7,302,796.00 


20.897.595 76 


Fund Balance June 30, 1997 


8.312.976.35 


6.622.744.58 


1.130.610.82 


580.047.00 


122.754 .18 


7.450.271 03 


24.219 403 96 



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110 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF LONG TERM DEBT AUTHORIZED 

JUNE 30, 1997 (1) 

ARTICLE PROJECT NAME AUTHORIZATION 



ART 18, 1985 SEWER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS 1,160,000.00 

ART 62. 1993 CONSERVATION 430,000.00 

ART 26. 1995 FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 384,000.00 

ART 23, 1996 HIGH SCHOOL RENOVATION 929,552.00 

ART 24, 1996 WATER DISTRIBUTION IMPROVEMENTS 250,000.00 

ART 47, 1996 SHAWSHEEN FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 4,000.00 

ART 53, 1996 CONSERVATION FUND 1,000,000.00 

ART 9A, 1996 CONSERVATION LAND ACQ 1,500,000.00 

ART 24, 1997 SENIOR CITIZEN CENTER 500,000.00 

Art 26, 1997 SCHOOL BUILDING PLANS 200,000.00 

Art 32, 1997 REPLACE GUARDRAILS 200,000.00 

Art 35. 1997 SEWER MAYFLOWER 350,000.00 

Art 55, 1997 FIRE TRUCK 600,000.00 

Art 56. 1997 PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER 150,000.00 



7.657.552.00 



(1) Reduced to reflect issue of 11/15/97 

ISSUE OF NOVEMBER 15. 1997 

ART 23, 1996 HIGH SCHOOL RENOVATIONS 1,497,000.00 

ART 24, 1996 WATER DISTRIBUTION IMPROVEMENT 1,800,000.00 

ART 34, 1997 SEWER PILGRIM/PIONEER 190,000.00 

ART 30, 1997 ROAD IMPROVEMENTS 500,000.00 

ART 25, 1995 REC PARK 213,000.00 

4,200,000.00 



111 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF RESERVE ACCOUNT AND COMPENSATION FUND 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1997 

RESERVE FUND 



Transfers by Authority of the 
Finance Committee: 



Transfers by Vote of Town Meeting, 
April , 1996 



Town Clerk 
Town Counsel 
Municipal Maintenance 
Elder Services 



Other Expenses 
Personal Services 



9,535.00 
80,000.00 
90,375.00 

5,000.00 



From Taxation 



200,000.00 



Transferred to Surplus 



15,090.00 
200,000.00 



200,000.00 



COMPENSATION FUND 



Transfers by Authority of the 
Board of Selectmen: 



Transfers by Vote of the Town Meeting, 
April , 1996 



Public Safety 

Department of Municipal Maint 

Carry Over 



Personal Services 
Personal Services 
Personal Services 



645,670.07 

35,665.00 

116,664.93 

798,000.00 



From Taxation 
From Carryover 



536,000.00 
262,000.00 



Balance to Surplus 



0.00 



798,000.00 



798,000.00 



112 



TRUST-CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1997 









BALANCE 








BALANCE 


FUND 


BENEFICIARY 


PRINCIPAL JULY 1,1996 


DEPOSITS 


INCOME 


DRAWN JUNE 30, 1997 


STABILIZATION 


TOWN 




1,294,853.21 


60,000.00 


113,391.02 




1,468,244.23 


CD. WOOD 


MEMORIAL 




737,914.09 




43,278.36 




781,192.45 


INSURANCE 


TOWN 




303,705.77 




15,090.15 


100,000.00 


218,795.92 


UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 






275,833.24 




14,785.37 


12,000.00 


278,618.61 


ESTATE S.P. WHITE 


SPRING GROVE 


5,766.63 


9,773.71 




529.72 




10,303.43 


POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 


POLICE 




14,708.01 


130.00 


404.93 


357.72 


14,885.22 


TOWN HALL RESTORATION 






219.45 




5.60 


225.05 


0.00 


CD&P-ROGERS BROOK 






4,036.22 




58.91 




4,095.13 


TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 






2,467,481.29 


4,341,302.99 


83,263.45 


4,474,452.12 


2,417,595.61 


J. GREELEY 


LIBRARY 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 




186.30 




5,186.30 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


PRINCIPAL 


345,825.50 


345,825.50 








345,825.50 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


INCOME 




145,359.90 




27,958.35 


12,858.54 


160,459.71 


JOHN CORNELL 


WOOD & COAL 


5,000.00 


37,001.60 




2,464.82 


500.05 


38,966.37 


DAVID & LUCY SHAW 


WELFARE 


10,000.00 


28,879.42 




1,693.76 




30,573.18 


W.L RAYMOND 


WELFARE 


7,845.81 


30,598.61 




1,793.86 


500.00 


31,892.47 


AJ. LINCOLN 


NEEDY CHILDREN 


5,000.00 


14,334.50 




776.92 




15,111.42 


E.I. RAYMOND 


WELFARE/FLOWERS 


1,302.77 


1,605.45 




94.16 




1,699.61 


TAYLOR 


FUEL 


300.00 


1,111.43 




65.19 




1,176.62 


SPRING GROVE 




275,000.00 


660,671.52 


34,960.00 


32,433.55 


35,000.00 


693,065.07 


EMILINE LINCOLN 


AV.I.S 


1,000.00 


1,070.53 




62.79 




1,133.32 


EMMA J. LINCOLN 


AV.I.S 




583.01 




34.19 




617.20 


CONSERVATION FUND 


CONSERVATION 




35,446.10 




2,078.90 




37,525.00 


SUNSET ROCK EXT 


HAMMOND WAY 




4,969.89 




128.17 




5,098.06 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


PRINCIPAL 




23,661.60 




1,223.00 


774.49 


24,110.11 


SMART 


FLOWERS 


1,000.00 


8,452.45 




495.73 


50.00 


8,898.18 


FARRINGTON 


FLOWERS 


600.00 


1,127.34 




66.12 


50.00 


1,143.46 


BALLARDVALE MEMORIAL 


FLOWERS 


532.88 


908.68 




53.28 


50.00 


911.96 


ALLEN 


FLOWERS 


200.00 


220.98 




12.96 


15.00 


218.94 


DRAPER 


SCHOOL 


1,058.93 


9,269.62 




543.66 




9,813.28 


RICHARDSON 


SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 


1,000.00 


7,198.78 




422.20 




7,620.98 


A & A.V. LINCOLN 


SPELLING BEE 


1,000.00 


4,835.16 




283.58 




5,118.74 


RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 


SCHOLARSHIP 


598.50 


598.50 








598.50 


RAFTON (INTEREST) 






1,136.47 


144.00 


68.98 




1,349.45 


CONROY 


HIGH SCHOOL 


291.71 


936.25 




54.91 




991.16 


AMERICAN LEGION 


HIGH SCHOOL 


200.00 


690.39 




40.49 




730.88 


CHRIS MAYNARD BOOKS 


SOUTH SCHOOL 


3,537.68 


3,512.68 


25.00 


206.02 




3,743.70 


HOLT 


SCHOOL 


81.95 


423.32 




24.84 




448.16 



DO TO/DUE FROM 



CEMETERY FUNDS 



BXBS WORKING CAPITAL ACCOUNT 



WORKERS COMP RESERVE 



6,483,954.67 


4,436,561.99 


344,074.24 


4,636,832.97 


6,627.757.93 


153,991.60 


686,406.15 




758,292.38 


82,105 37 


153,991.60 


686,406.15 


0.00 


758,292.38 


82.105.37 


56,814.73 


(52,440.00) 




(51,960.00) 


56.334 73 


56,814.73 


(52,440.00) 


0.00 


(51,960.00) 


56,334 73 


324,378.00 






(44,038.00) 


368.416 00 


324,378.00 


0.00 


0.00 


(44,038.00) 


368.416 00 


283,657.00 


32,000.00 






315 657 00 


283,657.00 


32,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


315.657 00 


7,302,796.00 


5,102,528.14 


344,074.24 


5,299,127.35 


7,450,271 03 



113 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14,15,16, 1997 



WARRANT 




ACTION 


ATT . GEN . 


ART. NO. 


DESCRIPTION 


TAKEN 


APPROVAL 


1 


Election 


Approved 




2 


Election of Officers not 
required by ballot 


Approved 




3 


Salaries of elected officials 


Approved 




4 


The Budget 


Approved 




5 


Town Budget transfers 


Approved 




6 


Grant Program Authorizations 


Approved 




7 


Road Contracts 


Approved 




8 


Free Cash - $300,000 


Approved 




9 


Unexpended Appropriations 


Withdrawn 




10 


Chapter 90 Funds 


Approved 




11 


Unpaid Bills 


Approved 




12 


Town Report 


Approved 




13 


Property Tax Exemptions 
Statute Acceptance 


Approved 




14 


Rescind Bond Authorization 


Withdrawn 




15 


Community Services Revolving Account 


Approved 





16 



17 



Statute Acceptance 

Community Development Revolving Account Approved 
Statute Acceptance 

Municipal Maintenance Revolving Account Approved 
Statute Acceptance 



18 



19 



20 



21 



22 



Council on Aging Revolving Account Approved 
Statute Acceptance 

Contracts in excess of three years Approved 
Statute Acceptance 

Accept grants of easements Approved 

Water/Sewer 

Grant easements Approved 

Water/Sewer 

Sr. Tax Voucher Program Approved 



114 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14.15.16. 1997 



WARRANT 




ART. 


NO. 


DESCRIPTION 


23 




Land Transfer/3 Acres 


24 




Sr. Citizen Center 

Bonding $500,000 


25 




Elderly Housing 

Zoning Bylaw Amendment 



26 

27 

28 
29 
30 

31 

32 

33 
34 

35 

36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 

44 



School Building Plans 

Bonding - $200,000 

Andover School Scholarship Fund 
Statute Acceptancs 



Numbering Warrant 

Reconstruct Osgood Street/Frontage Road Approved 

Road Improvements Approved 
Bonding - $500,000 

Reconstruct Sidewalks Approved 
$250,000 

Replace Roadside Guardrails Approved 
Bonding - $200,000 

Sewer Line/Ballardvale Defeated 

Sewer Line/Pilgrim Dr. /Pioneer Approved 
Bonding - $205,000 

Sewer Line - Mayflower Area Approved 
Bonding - $350,000 

Sewage Agreement - Lowell /Tewksbury Approved 

Official Warrant Defeated 

Record Selectmen Meetings Defeated 

Record Finance Committee Meetings Defeated 

Record School /Planning Board Meetings Approved 



ACTION ATT . GEN . 

TAKEN APPROVAL 

Approved 
Approved 

Approved August 6, 1997 

Approved 

Approved 

Defeated 



William Street - Abandon Portion 

William Street Easement 

William Street 

Street Acceptance 

Water Agreement /North Andover 



Approved 
Defeated 
Approved 

Approved 



115 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14.15.16. 1997 



WARRANT 
ART. NO, 

45 

46 

47 

48 

49 

50 

51 

52 

53 

54 

55 

56 

57 

58 

59 

60 
61 



DESCRIPTION 

Fireworks 

Selectmen Refuse Warrant Articles 

Conservation Agreement /Voc Tech 

River Road Land Acquisition 
Eminent Domain 

Accept Layout /Port ion of Burtt Road 
Eminent Domain 

Amend General Bylaw XII S 32(B) 
General Bylaw Amendment 

Amend General Bylaw XII S 32 (d) 
General Bylaw Amendment 



ACTION 


ATT . GEN . 


TAKEN 


APPROVAL 


Approved 




Defeated 




Approved 





Approved 

Approved August 6, 1997 

Approved August 6, 1997 



Exempt Police Chief From Civil Service Approved 
Special Legislation 



Change Date of Budget Submission 
General Bylaw Amendment 

Election Date Change 

General Bylaw Amendment 

Ladder/Pumper Truck Purchase 
Bonding - $600,000 

Public Safety Center Plans 
Bonding - $150,000 

Change Date of Submission of Warrant 
Articles 

Acquire Colonial Drive 

Eminent Domain/Street Acceptance 

Acquire Patriot Drive 

Eminent Domain/Street Acceptance 

Improvements to David Drive 

David Drive/Street Acceptance 



Approved August 6, 1997 

Approved August 6, 1997 

Approved 

Approved 

Defeated 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 
Withdrawn 



62 



63 



MVRT Transportation Appropriation 
$25,000 

Amend Zoning Bylaw VI. U Adult Use 
Zoning Bylaw Amendment 



Approved 



Approved August 6, 199" 



116 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14,15.16, 1997 



WARRANT 

ART. NO. DESCRIPTION 

64 Communication Tower 

Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

65 Lot Requirement 

Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

66 Setbacks 

Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

67 Slopes 

Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

68 Pedestrian Paths 

Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

69 Acquire Samos Lane 

Eminent Domain 

70 Earth Removal 

71 Heritage Estates 

Street Acceptance 

72 Newman Hill Drive 

Street Acceptance 

73 Possum Hollow Road 

Street Acceptance 

74 Stone Post Road 

Street Acceptance 

75 Harmony Lane 

Street Acceptance 

76 Scotland Drive 

Street Acceptance 

77 Acorn Drive 

Street Acceptance 

78 Hazelwood Circle 

Street Acceptance 

79 Basswood Lane 

Street Acceptance 

80 Cypress Lane 



ACTION 


ATT. GEN. 


TAKEN 


APPROVAL 


Approved 


August 28,1997 




Amended 



Approved August 6, 1997 

Approved August 6, 1997 

Approved August 6, 1997 

Approved August 6, 1997 

Approved 

Withdrawn 
Withdrawn 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Withdrawn 

Withdrawn 

Approved 



117 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 24. 1997 



Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on March 3, 1997 the Inhabitants of said Town who 
are qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated polling 
place. All eight precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, are to vote at 
the Dunn Gymnasium, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE TWENTY-FOURTH DAY OF MARCH, 1997 

at eight o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, have 
notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated in said 
Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each school house 
and in no less than five other public places where bill and notices are usually posted and by 
publication in the Andover Townsman. . Said Warrants have been posted and published fourteen 
days. 

Ronald F. Ford 

Constable 

ARTICLE 1. Took up Article One and proceeded to vote Town Offices. The ballot boxes were 
found to be empty and registered 0000. The polls were opened at eight o'clock A.M. and closed at 
eight o'clock P.M. 

The total number of ballots cast was 4132, viz: 



Prec. 1 - 572 


Prec. 2 - 533 


Prec. 3 - 506 


Prec. 4 - 529 


Prec. 5 - 505 


Prec. 6 - 479 


Prec. 7 - 465 


Prec. 8 - 543 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION - MARCH 24, 1997 

P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 P-7 P-8 Total 



MODERATOR 




















Times counted 


572 


533 


506 


529 


505 


479 


465 


543 


4132 


Blanks 


49 


32 


35 


34 


48 


32 


42 


50 


322 


Write-in votes 


3 


3 


2 


3 


3 


3 


4 


2 


23 


JAMES D DOHERTY 


441 


393 


362 


369 


345 


332 


334 


377 


2953 


JOHN DOYLE 


79 


105 


107 


123 


109 


112 


85 


114 


834 


SELECTMAN 1 YEAR 




















Times counted 


572 


533 


506 


529 


505 


479 


465 


543 


4132 


Blanks 


26 


23 


15 


35 


37 


33 


26 


24 


219 


Write-in votes 


1 





3 


2 


1 


2 





1 


10 


JAMES E FOX 


187 


281 


261 


256 


227 


221 


179 


219 


1831 


JOHN P HESS 


358 


229 


227 


236 


240 


223 


260 


299 


2072 


SELECTMAN 3 YEAR 




















Times counted 


1144 


1066 


1012 


1058 


1010 


958 


930 


1086 


8264 


Blanks 


175 


175 


175 


164 


175 


160 


141 


163 


1328 


Write-in votes 


1 


5 


3 


3 





1 


2 


1 


16 


LARRY L LARSEN 


347 


323 


298 


332 


286 


300 


270 


345 


2501 


SUSAN E JENKINS 


310 


238 


213 


219 


230 


210 


213 


265 


1898 


BRIAN P MAJOR 


311 


325 


323 


340 


319 


287 


304 


312 


2521 



118 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



APRIL 14, 1997 



SCHOOL COMM. 3 YEAR 




















Times counted 


1144 


1066 


1012 


1058 


1010 


958 


930 


1086 


8264 


Blanks 


250 


248 


227 


216 


214 


188 


175 


226 


1744 


Write-in votes 


3 


3 


2 


4 








1 


3 


16 


PHILIP J BYERS 


203 


226 


196 


239 


238 


222 


196 


224 


1744 


FRANK M ECCLES 


436 


324 


311 


314 


284 


273 


302 


363 


2607 


TIMOTHY M MCCARRON 


252 


265 


276 


285 


274 


275 


256 


270 


2153 


GR LAW REG VOC TEC 




















Times counted 


572 


533 


506 


529 


505 


479 


465 


543 


4132 


Blanks 


195 


148 


152 


172 


206 


153 


152 


177 


1355 


Write-in votes 





4 


7 


1 


2 


2 


1 





17 


JOSEPH GLEASON 


377 


381 


347 


356 


297 


324 


312 


366 


2760 


TRUSTEES PUNCHARD 




















Times counted 


2860 


2665 


2530 


2645 


2525 


2395 


2325 


2715 


20660 


Blanks 


1305 


1227 


1088 


1228 


1365 


1056 


1068 


1222 


9559 


Write-in votes 








5 


2 


5 


1 





3 


16 


EARL G EFINGER 


306 


284 


283 


280 


229 


255 


252 


298 


2187 


DONNA C ELLSWORTH 


312 


298 


288 


300 


245 


276 


257 


300 


2276 


ROBERT A FINLAYSON 


309 


285 


283 


272 


230 


260 


250 


304 


2193 


JOAN LEWIS 


324 


289 


299 


299 


231 


281 


258 


299 


2280 


JOHN PETTY 


304 


282 


284 


264 


220 


266 


240 


289 


2149 



After the final action on the preceding Article One, the said meeting shall stand adjourned by virtue 
of Chapter 39, Section 20 of the Massachusetts General Laws, to April 14 , 1997, at 7:00 P.M., at 
the Dunn Gymnasium, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



APRIL 14. 1997 



The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 1226 voters admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator at 7:04 P.M. 

The opening prayer was offered by The Reverend James A. Diamond, Christ Church, Central Street, 
Andover, MA. 

Salute to the flag was led by Gerald Silverman, Chairman, Board of Selectman. 

The song, America, written by Samuel Francis Smith in 1 83 1 while attending Andover Theological 
Seminary, was sung by Jennifer Powers, a student at Andover High School. 

Upon unanimous consent it was voted to admit Boy Scout Troop 77 and 17 non-voters to the 
meeting and allow non-voters to be escorted to the non voting section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the Gymnasium. 

A motion was made and seconded to accept M.G.L. c. 39 Sec. 15 as amended by the Acts of 1996 
to allow the moderator to declare a 2/3 vote. 

The motion was accepted by a Majority vote. 
119 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14. 1997 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator 
refer to the warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

The Town recognized Charles Wesson, Jr. for stepping forward to fill the vacant seat on the Board 
of Selectmen vacated by Barry Finegold until the Town Election on Mach 24, 1997. Selectman 
Silverman commended him for the fine job he did during the difficult months of budget and Town 
Meeting preparation. 

School Committee Chairman Tina Girdwood, present plaques to Susan Dal ton and Lloyd Wiley for 
their contribution to the School Committee during their years serving the community in elective 
office. 



ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectman for one year, two Selectmen for 
three years, two members of the School Committee for three years, one member of the Greater 
Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical School for three years and five seats on the Trustees of the 
Punchard Free School for three years. 

All the candidates above were voted for on one ballot on March 24, 1997: 

The polls were open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P. M. 

Town Clerk, Randall L. Hanson, declared the successful candidates to be as follows: 

James D. Doherty Moderator for One Year 

John P. Hess Selectman for One Year 

(To fill a vacancy for one year) 

Larry L. Larsen Selectman for Three Years 

Brian P. Major Selectman for Three Years 

Frank M. Eccles School Committee for Three Years 

Timothy M. McCarron School Committee for Three Years 

Joseph Gleason Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical School 

For three years 

Trustees of Punchard Free School for Three Years 

Earl F. Efinger 
Donna C. Ellsworth 
Robert A. Finlayson 

Joan M. Lewis 

John R. Petty 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by ballot. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Virginia H. Cole, 268 Highland Road, 
be elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
120 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14. 1997 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for the ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and by Tom Urbelis, Town Counsel, and duly seconded it was VOTED that the 
Town Moderator's salary be as follows: 

Town Moderator - $125.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and $30.00 for 

each Special Town Meeting except when it falls within the 
Annual Town Meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the salaries of other Town Officers be 
established as follows: 

Selectmen - Chairman - $ 1 ,500.00 

Members- $1,200.00 
School Committee - Chairman - $ 1 ,500.00 

Members- $1,200.00 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the Town will raise 
and appropriate, including appropriations from available funds, to defray charges and expenses of 
the Town, including debt and interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for the Fiscal Year beginning 
July 1, 1997, and ending June 30, 1998. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a MAJORITY vote to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money: 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

1 PERSONAL SERVICES Including $1 58,633 in Community 

Services receipts, $102,453 in elder 

Services receipts and $6,300 in Wetland 

filing fees $2,823,731.00 

2 OTHER EXPENSES Including $ 1 95,995 in Community 

Services, $20,565 in Elder Services 

receipts and $500 in Wetland filing fees 1,312,640.00 

Total Appropriated 4,136,371.00 

An amendment was moved and seconded to reduce General Government (Town Counsel 
Account) by $75,000. The amendment was disapproved by a Majority vote. 

MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 

3 PERSONAL SERVICES Including $50,000 from rental 

income and $70,000 from 

Cemetery interest income and 

$30,000 from sale of lots 2,108,053.00 

4 OTHER EXPENSES 2,266,095.00 

Total Appropriated 4,374,148.00 



121 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



APRIL 14, 1997 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

Including $255,000 from 
ambulance receipts, $32,315 from 
parking meter receipts and $38,000 from 
Federal and State grants 



7,958,476.00 



OTHER EXPENSES 



PERSONAL SERVICES 
OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $90,000 from 
ambulance receipts and $33,310 
from parking meter receipts 

Total Appropriated 

PUBLIC WORKS 



543,820.00 
8 ,502,296.00 

2,427,877.00 
6,113,525.00 



Total Appropriated 



8,541,402.00 



10 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



LIBRARY 

Including $29,007 from 
Merrimack Valley Library 
Consortium 

Including $49,805 from State 
Library Aid and $32,300 from 
Merrimack Valley Library 
Consortium 



1,360,480.00 



538,050.00 



Total Appropriated 
UNCLASSIFIED 

1 1 COMPENSATION FUND 

12 RESERVE FUND 

Total Appropriated 
ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



1,898,530.00 

50,000.00 
200,000.00 
250,000.00 



13 PERSONAL SERVICES Including $20,000 in 

Medicaid Receipts 

14 OTHER EXPENSES 

Total Appropriated 



25,481,207.00 
5,708,009.00 

31,189,216.00 



122 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14, 1997 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

15 Total Appropriated 104,544.00 

FIXED 



16 INTEREST EXPENSE 

17 BOND REDEMPTION 

1 8 STABILIZATION FUND 

19 INSURANCE EXPENSES 

20 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 

2 1 RETIREMENT - PERSONAL SERVICES 

22 RETIREMENT - OTHER EXPENSES 

23 CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 

24 NON-CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 

25 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 



Total Appropriated 



3,371,299.00 
6,157,700.00 
60,000.00 
611,000.00 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
2,706,455.00 
78,000.00 
3,325,000.00 

16,309,454.00 



TOTAL BUDGET APPROPRIATION 



$75,305,961.00 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - FREE CASH 

Article 8 Free Cash For FY 98 Budget 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 

Transfer from: 
Article 5 Public Works - Other Expenses 

Municipal Maintenance - Other Expenses 

Insurance 

General Government - Other Expenses 

and be appropriated to the following: 

Public Safety - Fire Personal Services 
Public Safety - Fire Other Expenses 
Library - Personal Services 
Municipal Maintenance - Personal Services 
General Government - Personal Services 



$ 300,000 
TOTAL 300,000 



$ 120,000 

85,000 

166,326 

30,000 



$ 122,326 
99,000 
98,000 
52,000 
30,000 



TOTAL 



RESCIND BOND AUTHORIZATIONS 

Article 34 Rescind Article 69, Annual 

Town Meeting, 1996 



$ 401,326 



145,000 



123 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - BORROWING 



Article 


24 


Article 


26 


Article 


30 


Article 


32 


Article 


34 


Article 


35 


Article 


55 


Article 


56 



Senior Citizen Center 

School Building Plans 

Road improvements 

Guardrail Replacement 

Sewer Line Pilgrim Dr/Pioneer Cir 

Sewer Line Mayflower Road Area 

Ladder/Pumper Truck 

Plans for Public Safety Center 



UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS 



NONE 



APRIL 14, 1997 



$ 500,000 
200,000 
500,000 
200,000 
190,000 
350,000 
600,000 
150.000 



TOTAL $ 2,690,000 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS 



Article 


11 


Article 


22 


Article 


27 


Article 


29 


Article 


31 


Article 


34 


Article 


45 


Article 


48 


Article 


49 


Article 


58 


Article 


59 


Article 


62 



Unpaid Bills 

Senior Tax Voucher Program 

Andover Scholarship Committee 

Reconstruct Osgood St/Frontage Rd 

Reconstruct Sidewalks 

Sewer - Pilgrim Drive/Pioneer Circle 

Fireworks 

River Road Land Acquisition 

Burtt Road layout 

Acquire Colonial Drive 

Acquire Patriot Drive 

MVRTA Transportation 



TOTAL 



$ 727.39 

50,000.00 

2,500.00 

70,000.00 

250,000.00 

2,317.64 

5,000.00 

5,000.00 

100.00 

38,000.00 

17,000.00 

25.000.00 

$ 465,645.03 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - CHAPTER 44 SEC. 53Vi REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 



Article 


15 


Article 


16 


Article 


17 


Article 


18 



Department of Community Services $ 
Community Development & Planning 
Municipal Maintenance 
Elder Services 



TOTAL 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM TAXATION 
Article 40 Record Committees 



200,000 
30,000 
30,000 

150.000 

$410,000 



1,000.00 



A true record 
ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



124 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14, 1997 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from amounts previously appropriated at the 
April 8, 1996 Annual Town Meeting as authorized by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 33B. 

A motion was moved and seconded that the sum of $401,326 be transferred from the following 

appropriations: 

Public Works - Other Expenses $1 20,000 

Municipal Maintenance - Other Expenses 85,000 

Insurance 166,326 

General Government - Other Expenses 30,000 

and be appropriated to the following: 

Public Safety - Fire Personal Services $122,326 

Public Safety - Fire Other Expenses 99,000 

Library - Personal Services 98,000 

Municipal Maintenance - Personal Services 52,000 

General Government - Personal Services 30,000 

An amendment to the motion was made by the Finance Committee as follows: 

that the sum of $381,326 be transferred from the following appropriations: 

Public Works - Other Expenses $1 00,000 

Municipal Maintenance - Other Expenses 85,000 

Insurance 166,326 

General Government - Other Expenses 30,000 

and be appropriated to the following: 

Public Safety - Fire Personal Services $102326 

Public Safety - Fire Other Expenses 99,000 

Library - Personal Services 98,000 

Municipal Maintenance - Personal Services 52,000 

General Government - Personal Services 30,000 

The amendment lost by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was approved by a Majority vote in the amount of $401,326.00. 

Finance Committee Report: See amendment 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town 
Manager to apply for, accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any 
funds allotted to Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. S. Government under 
any State or Federal grant program. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 6 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



125 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14, 1997 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a contract 
with the Massachusetts Highway Department Commissioners, the County Commissioners and/or 
either of them for the construction and maintenance of public highways in the Town of Andover for 
the ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 7 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 8. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use in free cash 
to reduce the Fiscal Year 1998 tax rate and to effect appropriations voted at the 1997 Annual Town 
Meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 8 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $300,000. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 9. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations and free cash 
in the treasury. 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire any necessary 
easements by gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway Construction. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 10 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN A 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum not to exceed 
$10,000 to pay unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred in prior Fiscal Years. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 1 1 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $727.39 for an Eagle Tribune advertising bill for Town 
and School Departments. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 4/5 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 12. To act upon the report of the Town officers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 12 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



126 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14, 1997 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the 
Acts of 1986 as amended by Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax 
exemption for Fiscal Year 1998 for those persons who qualify for property tax exemptions under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 13 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond authorizations from prior 
Town Meetings or take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Community Services revolving 
account for ticket sales, related trip expenses, new special events and youth activities for Fiscal Year 
1998; such expenses to be funded by revenues collected from these activities, and to authorize the 
Town Manager to make expenditures in an amount not to exceed $200,000 for FY- 1 998, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 15 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant not to exceed $200,000. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Community Development and 
Planning revolving account for expenses charged for advertising or legal hearings and/or legal 
notices associated with permit applications and for expenses charged for health clinics and Title V 
upgrade permits and applications for the Building, Health, Conservation and Planning divisions of 
said department for Fiscal Year 1998; such expenses to be funded by fees collected from applicants 
and clinic participants, and to authorize the Town Manager to make expenditures in an amount not 
to exceed $30,000 for Fiscal Year 1998 or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 1 6 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant not to exceed $30,000. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Department of Municipal 
Maintenance revolving account for field maintenance and related expenses for Fiscal Year 1998, 
such expenses to be funded by revenues collected by field rentals, and to authorize the Town 
Manager to make expenditures in an amount not to exceed $30,000 for FY- 1998, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 1 7 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant not to exceed $30,000. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



127 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14, 1997 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Elder Services revolving account 
for expenses related to the Adult Day Care Program, Meals-on-Wheels Program and other Senior 
activities and programs of said department for Fiscal Year 1998; such expenses to be funded by fees 
collected from participants, and to authorize the Town Manager to make expenditures in an amount 
not to exceed $250,000 for Fiscal Year 1998 or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing 
an Elder Services revolving account for expenses related to the Senior activities and programs of said 
department for Fiscal Year 1998; such expenses to be funded by fees collected from participants, and 
to authorize the Town Manager to make expenditures in an amount not to exceed $1 50,000 for Fiscal 
Year 1998. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote in accordance with the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 
30B, Section 12(b), to authorize the Town Manager, in his capacity as chief procurement officer, to 
solicit and award contracts for terms exceeding three years, including any renewal, extension or 
option, provided in each instance the longer term is determined to be in the best interest of the Town 
by a vote of the Board of Selectmen or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 19 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to accept grants of easements for water drainage, sewage disposal and utility purposes 
on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take 
any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 20 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to grant easements for water drainage, sewage disposal and utility purposes on terms and 
conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take any other 
action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 21 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, the 
sum of $50,000 for the purpose of providing senior citizens and disabled homeowners with a real 
estate tax payment voucher program pursuant to an agreement to be formulated by the Council on 
Aging and approved by the Town Manager or take any other action related thereto. 

128 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14, 19 97 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 22 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote in the amount of $50,000 from available funds. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the transfer of the care, custody, 
management and control of approximately 3.0 acres, more or less, of the Town-owned land behind 
Doherty Middle School containing portions of Assessors Map 39, Lots 173, 174, 179 and 180 as 
shown on a plan of land entitled "Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. for Andover Senior Center, owner: 
Town of Andover, Brian Moore, Town Engineer, 1 " = 40', January 1 0, 1 997", on file at the Town 
Clerk's Office, to the Selectmen for purposes of constructing an Andover Senior Center, parking lot 
and related construction and to authorize a change in use of said land to allow the construction of 
an Andover Senior Center and to authorize the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen to petition 
the General Court for special legislation for such a transfer and for such a change of use or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 23 as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $500,000 to be 
used with other funds to be provided by gift, grant or otherwise for constructing, originally 
equipping and furnishing a senior center, including costs of acquiring land by purchase or otherwise 
as a site for such senior center and for other costs incidental and related to the project and its 
financing, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $500,000 be appropriated to be 
used with other funds to be provided by gift, grant or otherwise, for constructing, originally 
equipping and furnishing a senior center, including costs of acquiring land by purchase or otherwise 
as a site for such senior center and for other costs incidental and related to the project and its 
financing, and that to raise this appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $500,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3), of 
the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded an amendment was offered by the Finance Committee to 
reduce the amount requested to $300,000. 

The amendment lost by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was approved. 

VOTE: YES: 984 NO: 54 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: See amendment 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 
Council On Aging: Approval 



129 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14, 1997 

At this point in the meeting Norma Gammon, chairperson of the 350th Celebration Committee, was 
called upon to deliver the committee's report: 

1 . The Program: Altogether there were forty eight (48) events sponsored by the 350th Committee 
or were related to the Anniversary. All were carried out as scheduled and generally very well 
received. 

2. The 350th Journal: Through the generosity of Raytheon, a one hundred page publication which 
covers the Anniversary events in photographs and script will be available to the citizens of the Town 
on a first come first serve basis (one per household). 

This Journal has been dedicated to Steven Keam, a member of the 350th Celebration Committee 
and the Boston Pops Chairman who passed away on March 22, 1997. 

3. Finances: While the financial books for the 350th Anniversary Celebration will not close until 
June 30, 1997, it is clear that monies will be left over for a gift to the Town. This happy outcome 
is due to a number of factors including: ticket sales for events meeting or exceeding budget 
expectations; merchandise; carefully controlled expenses; widespread volunteer support that allowed 
for the elimination of paid staff; and the generosity of both corporations and local citizens. 

After thoughtful consideration of many options the Committee decided to make the gift to the Town 
in three parts: 

1. The establishment of an annual "Home of America" scholarship through "Dollars for 
Scholars" program. 

2 A modest gift for Andover's 400th Anniversary, said gift to be held by the Town, with 

income added to the principal until the year 2040. 

3. The largest element is to be used to establish a fund to be named the "Andover, Home of 
America" Fund. The purpose of this fund is to promote the concept of "neighborhood" and 
"community". The income will be used for small projects which enhance the feeling of 
community and especially good neighborliness. The committee will consist of the current 
executive committee of the 350th Celebration Committee and they will oversee the process 
and make decisions on granting applications. 

The report Mrs. Gammon presented to the meeting formally concluded the committee's 
responsibilities to the Town. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By Law as follows: 

I. Delete the words "or sanitarium, rest, convalescent or nursing home" from Section IV.B.5. of the 
Zoning Bylaw. 

II. Insert a new subsection, 'TV.B.5A. Elderly Housing 

ZONING DISTRICTS 
Miscellaneous Main Uses SRA/SRB/SRC/APT 

1. Long term care facility* PB**PB PB 

2. Assisted living residence PB PB N 

3. Congregate care facility PB PB N 

4. Independent living PB PB N 
Residence 



130 



/APT 


LS 

N 


OP/GB/MU/1G/IA/ID 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N PBPBN N N 


N 


N 


N PBPBN N N 


N 


N 


N N N N N N" 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14. 1997 

III. Insert a new subsection "VI.V. Elderly Housing 

1. Purposes 

The objectives of this Section are to achieve the following public purposes: 

a. To provide for the development and use of alternative housing and nursing care for the 
elderly in accordance with the Town's Master Plan ; 

b. To create home health care, housing and other supportive services for the elderly 
population outside of an institutional setting; 

c. To encourage the preservation of open space; 

d. To provide alternative housing for the elderly that cause relatively little demand on Town 
services; 

e. To preserve the Town's residential character 

f. To provide such accommodations in a manner harmonious with the surrounding land uses 
while protecting natural resources and open space. 

g. To provide housing which is affordable to the elderly population who are Andover 
residents; 

2. Assisted Living Residences 

a. Applicability: The Planning Board is the Special Permit Granting Authority ("SPGA")for 
Assisted Living Facilities as defined in this bylaw. 

b. Design Standards and Guidelines: 

(1) Minimum lot size: An assisted living facility shall be permitted in a SRA and SRB zone 
only within a single lot containing a total area of not less than 5 acres. In the MU district, 
the minimum lot size shall be 2 acres. There shall be no minimum lot size required for the 
GB district. 

(2) Density: The maximum allowable density shall be 3000 square feet of lot area per 
assisted living unit. 

(3) Dimensional requirements: 

(a) Building height: Any addition or new construction shall not exceed 35 feet in 
height as measured in accordance with the State Building Code or three stories. This 
does not preclude the reuse and renovation of existing structures which may exceed 
this height limit. 

(b) Building coverage: The maximum building coverage, including accessory 
buildings, shall not exceed 30% of the lot area for new construction or expansion of 
existing structures. 

(c) Building set backs: In the SRA and SRB zones, buildings shall be set back a 
minimum of 50 feet from all property lines. In the MU zone, the building set back 
will be 20 feet. Buildings in the GB zone shall be set back as required in Section 
V.B.2.d of this bylaw. 

(d) Set back from residential dwellings: In the SRA and SRB zones, all buildings 
associated with the assisted living facility shall be no closer than 200 feet from 
existing residential dwellings; however, with respect to accessory structures not 
greater than 300 square feet in said zones, the SPGA, in its discretion, may reduce 
said set back by an amount up to but not greater than 100 feet if it determines that 
said structure will not adversely impact the use and enjoyment of the existing 
residential dwelling. In the MU and GB districts, the set back shall be 50 feet. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14. 1997 

(e) Minimum lot frontage: The minimum lot frontage shall conform to the 
requirements of the district where such use is located. 

c. Other Requirements: 



(1) Town services: Assisted living residences shall be serviced by public water and sewer 
of sufficient capacity to serve the project. Any extension and/or replacement of sewer and/or 
water lines necessary to provide sufficient capacity shall be the responsibility of the 
applicant. 

(2) Transportation services: The operator of the assisted living residence shall be required 
to provide or arrange for transportation to town services and facilities. 

(3) Common Open Space: In the SRA and SRB districts, there shall be an area of common 
open space equal to at least 30% of the lot area. The common open space shall be retained 
in perpetuity for conservation or passive recreation use. No more than 25% of the minimum 
required open space shall be situated within wetlands. A permanent conservation restriction 
running to or enforceable by the Town shall be recorded for the common open space area and 
shall include restrictions that the land be retained in perpetuity for conservation and/or 
passive recreation. 

(4) Parking: The minimum number of parking spaces provided on the lot shall be 0.4 
parking space per assisted living unit plus one parking space per three employees during the 
largest shift. Up to 25% of the minimum number of required spaces may be allocated for 
compact cars in accordance with the design standards of Section IV.A.5.b. of this bylaw. 
The Planning Board, in its discretion, may require additional parking spaces to serve the 
needs of employees, visitors and service vehicles, such spaces to be provided in a "reserve 
parking area" which would not be built unless determined necessary by the Inspector of 
Buildings. 

(5) Access and On-Site Circulation: Adequate on-site circulation shall be provided to and 
from the site, taking into consideration the adjacent sidewalks and streets and accessibility 
of the site and building(s) thereon for emergency vehicles. Adequate provision shall be made 
for off-street loading and unloading requirements of delivery vehicles and passengers using 
private transportation. 

(6) Public Safety: For any assisted living residence, the structure shall comply with the 
National Fire Protection Association Life Safety Code, including sprinklers. The facility 
shall also have an integrated emergency call, telephone and other communication system to 
provide monitoring for its residents. There shall be sufficient site access for public safety 
vehicles. A plan shall be approved by the Andover Fire Department for the emergency 
evacuation of residents with emphasis on ensuring the safety of residents with physical 
impairments. 

(7) Landscaping: Landscaping and screening is required to obscure visibility from beyond 
the boundaries of the premises of parking areas, dumpster locations, and loading areas. 

(8) Affordability: Except as provided in Sections VI.V.2.c.(8)(e) and VI.V.2.c.(8)(I), 15% 
of the total number of assisted living units shall be set aside as affordable housing 

units for elderly persons who qualify as low, moderate or upper-moderate income persons 
as defined as follows: 

Low Income - below 60% of the Lawrence SMS A median income based on HUD 
figures ("Median Income") 

Moderate Income - 60-79% of Median Income 
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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14, 1997 

Upper-Moderate Income - 80-100% of Median Income 

In determining the total number of affordable units required, a fractional unit of .5 or more 
shall be regarded as a whole unit. To the extent legally permissible, the affordable units shall 

be offered to eligible Andover residents before being offered to non-Andover eligible elderly 
persons. 

(a) Such affordable units may be rented, sold or otherwise provided to qualified 
elderly persons in accordance with income and asset limitations established by the 
authorizing state or federal agency in those instances where the affordable units 
benefit directly from such assistance, or in the absence thereof pursuant to the 
definitions of income and assets established for the Low Income Housing Tax Credit 
program, or pursuant to the standards promulgated by the SPGA. 

(b) Affordable units shall be dispersed throughout the building(s) and shall be 
compatible with and generally comparable to the market-rate units in terms of 
location, quality and character. 

(c) Of the affordable units, the applicant shall set aside units representing all three 
income levels as follows: 20% shall serve low income persons, 50% shall serve 
moderate income persons and 30% shall serve upper moderate income persons. 

(d) Although eligibility for the affordable units shall be determined by reference to 
income and assets of the prospective residents, the affordable units shall be 
considered affordable only if they are restricted in the amount of monthly rent or 
other monthly charges for the unit based upon a percentage of the applicable Median 
Income. For purposes of computing the monthly rent or other monthly charges for 
the unit, there shall be excluded any special charges for extra or specialized services 
which are not provided to the general population of the project but are unique to the 
particular needs of an individual resident. The standards of affordability for 
proposed projects including, without limitation, the methods of determining and 
maintaining eligibility, the percentage of applicable Median Income used for limiting 
the monthly amounts charged for the affordable units, and any variations in the 
percentages of Median Income in the three income levels, shall be set and revised 
from time to time by the SPGA provided said standards are consistent with 
appropriate Federal and State standards. 

(e) At the discretion of the SPGA, the applicant may be permitted to set aside a lower 
percentage of affordable units, but in no case less than 10% of the units if, in the 
opinion of the SPGA, the applicant has demonstrated that public subsidies (including 
without limitation, public or low interest financing, tax benefits and Town provided 
subsidies such as provision of services, real estate tax abatements or reduced 
assessments or reductions of water and sewer charges with respect to the affordable 
units) are unavailable or inappropriate and/or the provision of the required percentage 
of affordable units will threaten the viability of the project without some form of 
relief. In such cases, or in order to encourage an applicant to exceed the required 
percentage of affordable units, the SPGA may : 

(i) provide a density bonus whereby the total number of allowable units 
computed under Section VI.V.2.b.(2) ("Maximum Allowable Units"), may 
be increased by an amount of additional units determined by the SPGA, not 
to exceed 25% of the Maximum Allowable Units, and any such additional 
units granted by the SPGA as a density bonus shall be market units and shall 
not cause a corresponding increase in the number of required affordable units; 

(ii) permit higher percentages of units to be offered to moderate or upper- 
moderate income persons; and/or 

133 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14, 1997 

(iii) permit the applicant to make a cash or other contribution to the Town or 
its designee for use by the Town in (a) providing or subsidizing affordable 
housing for low, moderate and upper-moderate income elderly persons as 
defined by this section of the by-law or (b) providing other elderly facilities 
or elderly services. 

(f) Affordability restrictions shall be embodied in applicable deed covenants, 
contractual agreements and/or other mechanisms to ensure compliance with this 
subsection. 

(g) All affordable units shall be maintained as affordable housing units for the life of 
the Assisted Living Facility. 

(h) Prior to the issuance of any building permit for any units, a clearance certificate 
shall be required to be issued by the Planning Department indicating compliance with 
this subsection. No clearance certificate shall be issued for any units until (1) all 
documents necessary to ensure compliance with this subsection (including, without 
limitation, the documents referred to in subparagraph (f) have been executed and, 
if required, recorded at the Registry of Deeds and (2) any required cash or other 
contribution has been made to the Town or its designee. 

(i) Nothing in this subsection shall preclude a developer from setting aside more than 
the required number of affordable units or from setting aside additional units for 
higher but limited income groups or from setting aside more units for lower income 
groups. 

(9) Accessory Uses: The operator of the assisted living facility may also provide optional 
services on the site for the convenience of residents, including, but not limited to 
transportation, barber/beauty services, sundries for personal consumption, laundry services, 
and other amenities, provided such uses serve primarily the residents and staff of the 
Assisted Living Residence and the accessory uses shall be wholly within a residential 
structure and shall have no exterior advertising display; 

(10) Existing Facilities: None of the provisions of this section shall apply to Assisted 
Living Residences existing on the date of adoption of this section. 

d. Special Permit Procedure: The procedure for a special permit under this section shall 
comply with the procedures outlined in Section VI.0.3.h. of this bylaw, which includes 
application procedures, special permit criteria and guidelines for Planning Board review of 
the proposal. The Planning Board may impose additional conditions if in its judgement such 
conditions are needed to increase the compatibility of the project with its surrounds or to 
better provide for the residents. 

3. Long Term Care Facilities : 

a. Design Standards and Guidelines: 

(1) Building coverage: The maximum building coverage, including accessory buildings, 
shall not exceed 30% of the lot area for new construction or expansion of existing structures. 

(2) Building set backs: Buildings shall be set back a minimum of 50 feet from all property 
lines. 

(3) Set back from residential dwellings: All buildings associated with the long term care 
facility shall be no closer than 200 feet from existing residential dwellings. 



134 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 14, 1997 

(4) Minimum lot frontage: The minimum lot frontage shall conform to the 
requirements of the district where such use is located. 

b. Other requirements: 

(1) Town services: Long-term care facilities shall be serviced by public water and sewer 
of sufficient capacity to serve the project. Any extension and/or replacement of sewer 
and/or water lines necessary to provide sufficient capacity shall be the responsibility of the 
applicant. 

4. Congregate Living Facilities: 

a. Applicability: The provisions for Assisted Living Residences shall apply. 

5. Independent living residence: 

a. Applicability: The provisions of subsection VI.O.l, conversion of a one or two or more 
family dwelling, shall apply. 

b. Parking requirements: The provisions of Section VI.A.4.a(2) shall apply." 
IV. Insert the following definitions in Section II: 

36. Long term care facility: An institution or distinct part of an institution which is licensed by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health to provide 24-hour care under medical supervision to 
individuals who, by reason of advanced age, chronic illness, or infirmity, are unable to care for 
themselves. Long term care facilities provide assistance with Activities of Daily Living as defined 
by 651 CMR 12.02, as well as skilled nursing and medical care by a skilled nursing staff. 

37. Assisted living residence: A residential development subject to certification by the Executive 
Office of Elder Affairs under G.L. Chapter 19D, defined as an entity, however organized, whether 
conducted for profit or not for profit, which meets all of the following criteria: 

a. provides room and board; 

b. provides assistance with activities of daily living and personal care services for three or 
more non-related adult residents; and 

c. collects payments or third party reimbursements from or on behalf of residents to pay 
for the provision of assistance. 

Assisted living residences are for frail elders who do not require 24-hour skilled nursing care, but 
need assistance with dressing, bathing, eating, housekeeping, medicine monitoring, and other 
activities of daily living. This definition shall not include group homes, rooming or lodging houses, 
nursing facilities, or other types of elderly housing. 

38. Assisted living units: One or more rooms in an Assisted Living Residence designed for and 
occupied by one or two elderly individuals per bedroom as the private living quarters of such 
individuals. 

39. Assistance with Activities of Daily Living: Providing support, aid, assistance, prompting, 
guidance, or observations of meal preparation, housekeeping, clothes laundering, shopping for food 
or other items, use of transportation and other similar tasks with the purpose of supporting an 
individual to remain in a residential environment for as long as possible. 

40. Congregate living facility: A non-institutional, shared living environment which integrates 
shelter and service needs of functionally impaired and/or socially isolated elderly persons who are 
otherwise in good health and can maintain a semi-independent life style and who do not require 

135 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 15, 1997 

constant supervision or intensive health care as provided by an institution. Each resident shall have 
an individual bedroom and may have a separate living room, kitchen, dining area, or bathroom, and 
may share living, dining, and bathroom facilities with other elderly persons, such as a common 
dining facility. 

41 . Elderly: For the purposes of this bylaw, a person who is 55 years of age or older. 

42. Independent living residence: A dwelling that provides accommodations in dwelling units for 
elderly persons. These residences may include common areas, a common dining facility and space 
for the provision of social, psychological, and educational programs. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and seconded Article 25 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

An motion was made and seconded to amend section VI.V.2.c.(7) (Landscaping) and add the 
following sentence: 

"In the SRA and SRB zones, the minimum setback from all property lines of such parking lots, 
dumpster locations, and loading areas, except for their points of ingress and egress, shall be 15 feet." 

The motion was approved by a Majority vote. 

The amended motion was approved. 

VOTE: YES: 1010 NO: 1 A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $200,000 for 
architectural/engineering fees associated with the preparation of Preliminary Plans and Designs for 
renovation, additions and/or construction of school buildings or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $200,000 be appropriated for 
architectural and engineering fees associated with the preparation of preliminary plans and designs 
for renovations, additions and/or construction of school buildings, and that to raise this 
appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to 
borrow $200,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(2 1 ) and (22), of the General Laws, 
or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: YES: 653 NO: 210 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Disapproval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:34 P.M., until Tuesday, April 
15, 1997 at 7:00 P. M. at the Gymnasium, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 15. 1997 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 543 voters were admitted to the meeting. 
The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:04 P.M. 



136 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 15, 1997 

A motion was made and seconded to accept M.G.L. c. 39, Sec. 15, as amended by the Acts of 1996 
to allow the Moderator to declare a 2/3 vote. The motion was accept by a Majority vote. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit seven (7) non-voters to the meeting and to escort non- 
voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of General Laws Chapter 60, 
Section 3C and to: 

(a) design and designate on its municipal tax bills, or the motor vehicle excise tax bills, or to 
mail with such tax bills a separate form, whereby the taxpayers of Andover can voluntarily 
check off, donate and pledge an amount not less than one dollar or such other designated 
amount which shall increase the amount otherwise due, and to establish a Town of Andover 
Scholarship Fund, the purpose of which shall be to provide educational financial aid to 
deserving Town residents in accordance with General Laws Chapter 60, Section 3C; and 

(b) establish the Andover Scholarship Committee which shall have nine members to consist of 
the Superintendent of Schools or designee thereof and eight residents of Andover appointed 
by the Board of Selectmen to a term of three years; said committee shall select the recipients 
of and amounts of financial aid from the Town of Andover Scholarship Fund; and 

(c) raise by taxation or transfer from available funds or any combination of the foregoing and 
appropriate the sum of $2,500.00 to finance the initial funding for the Andover Scholarship 
Committee and to authorize the Andover Scholarship Committee to expend the funds; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 27 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town of Andover 
by inserting in the appropriate place the following: 

1 . All articles in the warrant shall be numbered sequentially by the Board of Selectmen. At 
Town Meeting, the Town Clerk shall place all article numbers in a container. The Town 
Moderator shall draw a number and that article shall be presented to Town Meeting for 
action. Another number may not be drawn until Town Meeting has acted upon that article. 

2. Certain articles that are related to each other (or one another) - whereby the passage of the 
article is dependent upon the action of other article - shall be taken as one drawing for action. 

3. When the Budget (Omnibus) article is drawn, the order of consideration of said article shall 
be drawn from a second container, which shall contain function headings: Administration, 
Public Safety, Public Works, Education, etc. 

4. During Town Meeting, after an article has been acted upon and prior to another number 
being drawn, any voter may move to consider any remaining article. This motion shall 
require a four-fifths vote of Town Meeting. 

5. Once an article has been drawn, any voter may move to postpone consideration to another 
time. Such motion shall require a two-thirds vote of Town Meeting. 



137 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 15, 1997 

6. The official record of each Town Meeting shall report the articles in the order as printed in 

the warrant. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Article 28 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum of $100,000 for the 
design and reconstruction of the intersection of Osgood Street and Frontage Road, and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain such 
land and or easements as may be required, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 29 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $70,000 from available funds. 

VOTE: YES: 301 NO: 7 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum of $500,000 to 
supplement funds received from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for highway purposes, for 
constructing or reconstructing public ways with permanent pavement, including costs incidental or 
related thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $500,000 be appropriated to 
supplement funds received from The Commonwealth of Massachusetts for highway purposes, for 
constructing or reconstructing public ways with permanent pavement, including costs incidental and 
related thereto; and that to raise this appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $500,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
7(5), of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor. 

An amendment was made and seconded to reduce the amount to $250,000. The amendment lost by 
a Majority vote. 

The original motion was Approved: 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN A 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $250,000 
for the purpose of reconstructing sidewalks along the Main Street corridor and nearby streets and to 
authorize the town to acquire any necessary easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right 
of eminent domain or take any other action related thereto. 



138 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 15, 1997 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 3 1 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $250,000 from available funds. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $200,000 
for the purpose of replacement of roadside guardrails at various streets or take any other action 
related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $200,000 be appropriated for 
the replacement of roadside guardrails at various streets,- and that to raise this appropriation, the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $200,000 
under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(9), of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, 
and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum of $1,550,000 for the 
cost of engineering and appraisal services to prepare plans for the construction of sanitary sewer 
lines in the Ballardvale Road area and the South Main Street area as shown on the 1 979 Wastewater 
Facilities Plan or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $1,550,000 be appropriated for 
the cost of engineering and related appraisal services to prepare plans for the construction of sanitary 
sewer lines in the Ballardvale Road area and the South Main Street area, as shown on the 1 979 
Wastewater Facilities Plan, and that to raise this appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $1,550,000 under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 7(22), of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds 
or notes of the Town therefor. 

An amendment was moved and seconded to see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate a sum 
of $500,000.00 to develop independent engineering and cost appraisals with appropriate 
demographic and environment studies to aid in the evaluation of the economic comparison of 
sewering vs. upgrading or replacing existing septic systems. One focus of the report should be the 
projected growth in population that will be the result of sewering currently unbuildable or marginal 
land. The report shall be issued prior to proceeding with any drawings or specifications. The 
analysis shall be performed by independent professionals and entities without any financial interest 
in the outcome. 

The amendment was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Article 33 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: YES: 213 NO: 221 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 
Board of Health Report: Approval 

139 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



APRIL 15. 1997 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the vote on Article 69 of the 1996 Annual 
Town Meeting and vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by 
any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $205,000 for the installation 
of a sanitary sewer line in Pilgrim Drive and the Pioneer Circles or take any other action related 
thereto. Betterments are to be assessed. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the vote on Article 69 of the 1996 Annual 
Town Meeting be rescinded to the extent that sums appropriated thereunder have not already been 
expended and that the sum of $2,3 1 7.64 be transferred from available funds to repay sums previously 
advanced under Article 69 and, further, that the sum of $190,000 be appropriated for the installation 
of a sanitary sewer line in Pilgrim Drive and the Pioneer Circles, and that to raise this appropriation, 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $190,000 
under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(1), of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, 
and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, and that betterments shall be assessed in 
connection with the project. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN A 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to raise, by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $350,000 
total for the installation of a sanitary sewer line in Reservation Road, Mayflower Drive, Standish 
Circle and Miles Circle. Betterments are to be assessed. 

On petition of Edward Kaufman and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $350,000 be appropriated for 
the installation of a sanitary sewer line in Reservation Road, Mayflower Drive, Standish Circle and 
Miles Circle; and that to raise this appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $350,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(1), of 
the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor; 
and that betterments shall be assessed in connection with the project. 



VOTE: 



YES: 321 



NO: 84 



A 2/3 vote required 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen 
to enter into an Agreement or Agreements with the City of Lowell and the Town of Tewksbury to 
provide sewerage disposal services and water to users of those services in the area of River Road in 
the Town of Andover on terms and conditions deemed by the Town Manager and Board of 
Selectmen to be in the best interests of the Town, including a term of up to 25 years or to take any 
other action related thereto. 



On petition of Sr. Therese Lacroix and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 36 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

140 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 15, 1997 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to require that, henceforth, the Selectmen shall provide 
each voter of the Town of Andover with an official copy of the Warrant for any annual or special 
Town Meeting, to be used for the conduct of the business of such Town Meeting, and stating the 
time and place of holding the meeting and the subjects to be acted upon thereat, in compliance with 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 39, Section 10; such document to be devoid of editorial 
comment, recommendations and statements of approval or disapproval of any kind. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Article 37 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate a sum not to exceed 
$4000 for the first year's operation, and to require that, henceforth, all regular and special meetings 
of the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover, including executive sessions, shall be recorded 
officially in their entirety by means of a tape recorder or by other means of sonic reproduction, from 
the resulting recordings of which transcripts shall be made, such recordings and transcripts to be 
preserved in perpetuity, and copies of both the recordings and the transcripts shall be made available 
to the public as soon as possible, at no greater than actual cost. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Article 38 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate a sum not to exceed 
$4000 for the first year's operation, and to require that, henceforth, all meetings of the Finance 
Committee of the Town of Andover, including executive sessions, shall be recorded officially in 
their entirety by means of a tape recorder or by other means of sonic reproduction, from the resulting 
recordings of which transcripts shall be made, such recordings and transcripts to be preserved in 
perpetuity, and copies of both the recordings and the transcripts shall be made available to the public 
as soon as possible, at no greater than actual cost. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Article 39 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 



ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum not to 
exceed $1,000.00 for the first year's operation and to require that, henceforth all meetings of the 
School Committee and Planning Board of the Town of Andover shall be recorded officially in their 
entirety by means of a tape recorder or by other means of sonic reproduction. Such recordings to 
be preserved in perpetuity and copies shall be made available to the public at no greater than actual 
cost. 

On petition of Patricia Torey D'Ambra and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum not to exceed $1000.00 for the first years operation and to require 
that henceforth all meetings of the School Committee, Planning Board, Finance Committee and the 
Board of Selectmen shall be recorded in their entirety by means of a tape recorder or by other means 

141 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 15, 1997 

of sonic reproduction. Such recordings to be preserved for five (5) years, and copies shall be made 
to the public at no greater than actual cost. 



Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to abandon and convey to abutters a portion of an 
existing public way, William Street, shown as parcels "B", "D", "F" and "H" on a plan approved by 
the Andover Planning Board, and entitled: "William Street Lot Layout Plan, dated February 14, 
1994, Scale 1" = 40', owner: Thomas J., Edna M. Thomas, Engineer: H.W. Moore Associates, Inc." 
which plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12416. 

On petition of James M. White and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 41 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to: 

(a) transfer custody and control to the Board of Selectmen to abandon and sell or otherwise convey 
all of the Town's right, title and interest in and to a portion of a certain drainage easement off 
William Street and shown on a Plan entitled, "Plan Showing Proposed Drainage Easement on Land 
of Carmelina M. Grieco, Edna Grieco Thomas, Richard N. Grieco, Andover, Mass.", Scale 1" = 80', 
dated January, 1972 and recorded as Plan No. 6588 together with written easement from Carmelina 
M. Grieco, Edna Grieco Thomas and Richard N. Grieco to the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
dated March 31, 1972 and duly recorded with Essex North District Deeds in Book 1191, Page 625, 
said portions to be abandoned, sold or conveyed are shown on a plan entitled, "Plan of Land in 
Andover, MA, Owned by Anita Koolen & Nicholas Thomas", Scale 1" = 40', Date: 12/9/96, Scott 
L. Giles, R.P.L.S., Frank S. North Andover, to be recorded with said Deeds and further described 
as follows: 

The easement line, shown as "Exist. Ease. Line To Be Abandon" on said plan, 
running from land now or formerly of Grieco as shown on said plan across the 
southerly/southeasterly bound of Lot 8 by William Street as shown on said plan to 
the southwesterly bound by Lot 7, thence running northerly twenty-two feet (22) 
more or less, to the line of the Existing 20' Wide Drain Easement as shown on said 
plan; and 

The easement line shown as "Exist. Easement Line To Be Abandon" on said plan, 
which runs across a portion of Lot 8 and measures two hundred forty (240) feet in 
length; and 

(b) authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept a grant of easement for drainage purposes, said 
easement shown as a "Prop. 20' Wide Easement" as shown on said "Plan of Land in Andover, MA. 
Owned by Anita Koolen & Nicholas Thomas", Scale 1" = 40', Date: 12/9/96, to be recorded and 
further described as follows: 

The Proposed easement line as shown on said plan being a distance of thirty feet 
from land now or formerly of Grieco, thence running twenty feet in width by William 
Street and across the southerly/southeasterly bound of Lot 8 to a point measuring 

142 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 15, 1997 

eight (8) feet from the southwesterly boundary of Lot 8, by Lot 7, to the line of the "Existing 
20' Wide Drain Easement" as shown on said plan. 

or take any other action in relation thereto. 

On petition of Anita Koolen & Nicholas Thomas and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 42 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: MODERATOR DECLARED VOTE NOT A 2/3 VOTE A 2/3 vote required 

Article 42 was DEFEATED. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 



ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will accept and name as a public way, William Street, as shown 
on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, and entitled: "William Street Lot Layout Plan, 
dated February 14, 1994, Scale 1" = 40', owner: Thomas J., Edna M. Thomas, Engineer: H.W. 
Moore Associates, Inc." which plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan 
Number 12416. 

On petition of James M. White and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 43 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into an 
agreement with the Town of North Andover for the sale of water by Andover to North Andover upon 
such terms and conditions which the Board of Selectmen deem in the best interest of the Town or 
take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 44 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available funds the sum of $5,000 
for the July 4, 1997 fireworks or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 45 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote in the amount of $5000. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to empower the Selectmen to refuse to insert certified 
private articles on the Town Warrant drafted and submitted in full compliance with M.G.L. C39, S 1 
which states, "The Selectmen shall insert in the Warrant all subjects, the insertion of which shall be 
requested of them in writing by 10 or more registered voters. 

On petition of Dennis Teves and others 
143 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 15. 1997 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town will vote to empower the 
Selectmen to refuse to insert certified private articles on the Town Warrant drafted and submitted 
in full compliance with M.G.L. C39, S10. 

Article 46 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 



ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the 
Conservation Commission to enter into an Agreement or Agreements and to ratify any Agreements 
entered into with the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School District and 
Phillips Academy, including a Management Agreement with an initial duration often years with 
provision for automatic renewal or renegotiation by the Parties, upon terms and conditions the Board 
and Commission deem to be in the best interest of the Town, and to grant and accept easements in 
real estate and to convey and accept conveyances of real estate lying between River Road and the 
Merrimack River as shown on plans entitled "Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts" dated April 
14, 1995 by Dana F. Perkins, Inc. and "Subdivision and Easement Plan of Land in Andover, 
Massachusetts" dated April 17, 1995 by Dana F. Perkins, Inc. on file with the Town Clerk's Office 
and to authorize such grants, conveyances and acceptances and to authorize the Town Manager and 
Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for special legislation for such Agreements, real 
estate grants, conveyances and acceptances or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 47 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

An amendment was moved and seconded to insert after the last sentence: "provided that any such 
agreements, grants, conveyances, and acceptances reserve to the Town of Andover the right to 
permit both pedestrian and vehicular access to its property on the Merrimack River during daylight 
hours." 

The amendment passed by a Majority vote. 

The amended motion was approved. 

VOTE: YES: 298 NO: A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to acquire by purchase or 
eminent domain, or accept a conveyance or gift of easements, fees or any other interests therein, the 
following described interests in land for purposes of widening and improving portions of River 
Road; and raise from taxation or transfer from available funds or an combination thereof and 
appropriate a sum of $5,000 for said acquisitions, purchases, conveyances or takings by eminent 
domain; and to accept a gift or gifts of such sums as may be necessary to fully reimburse the Town 
for the costs of carrying out the purposes of this article, including all costs, expenses, attorneys' fees 
and damages, including but not limited to those resulting from proceedings against the Town brought 
by affected owners pursuant to General Law Chapter 79; and to accept the alteration, relocation, 
widening and improvement of the layout of said portions of River Road as shown on a plan entitled 
"Andover-River Road 1997 Alteration, dated January 10, 1997 by Vanasse & Associates Inc., scale 
1" = 20', sheets 1,2 and 3." 



144 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 15. 1997 

The interest in land to be acquired and accepted are shown on said plan and described as follows: 



Parcel No. 

Parcel 1-T-l 
Parcel l-T-2 
Parcel l-T-3 
Parcel l-T-4 
Parcel S-l 
Parcel S-2 
Parcel S-3 
Parcel S-4 
Parcel S-5 
Parcel S-6 
TS-1 
RE-1 
RE-2 



Land Area 



22.22 square feet 
2,742.33 square feet 
3,267.70 square feet 
2,308.72 square feet 
5,136.26 square feet 
4,587.72 square feet 
5,774.28 square feet 
8,281.35 square feet 
2,200.89 square feet 
532.55 square feet 
9,010.91 square feet 
4,000.00 square feet 
Shattuck Road 



The Interests in Land 
to be Acquired 

Fee 

Fee 

Fee 

Fee 

Slope and Drain Easement 

Slope and Drain Easement 

Slope Easement 

Slope Easement 

Slope Easement 

Slope Easement 

Traffic Signal 

Right of Entry 

Right of Entry 



or take any other action related thereto. 



Upon motion made duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 48 as printed in the Warrant 
in the amount of $5000 from available funds. 



VOTE: UNANIMOUS 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



A 2/3 vote required 



ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to accept the layout of a portion of the extension of 
Burtt Road from the westerly line of Parcel A to the Andover/Wilmington Town Line, said portion 
of the layout and said Parcel A being more fully depicted on a plan entitled, "Layout and Taking 
Plan in Andover and Wilmington, Massachusetts by Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc., Scale 1" = 100'; 
Dated December 1 8, 1996", and filed with the Town Clerk; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to acquire by gift, conveyance, purchase or taking by eminent domain, fees, easements and such 
other interests as may be necessary for highway purposes in the following described parcels of land: 

Parcel A containing 41 ,827 square feet as shown on said plan; 

Parcel B containing 8,338 square feet as shown on said plan; 

Parcel C containing 34,807 square feet as shown on said plan; 

Parcel D containing 2, 483 square feet as shown on said plan; 

Parcel E containing 16,714 square feet as shown on said plan; 

Parcel G containing 5,341 square feet as shown on said plan; 

Parcel H-l containing 12,393 square feet as shown on said plan; 

and raise from taxation or transfer from available funds, and appropriate the sum of $100.00 for said 
acquisitions by conveyance, purchase or taking by eminent domain; or take any other action related 
thereto 



145 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 16, 1997 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 49 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XII, Section 32 (b) of the General 
Bylaws of the Town by inserting after the word "suspend", in line one, the following words: "a 
building permit, or", or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 50 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XII, Section 32 (d) of the General 
Bylaws of the Town by deleting the number "268", in line four, and replacing it with the following: 
"268A", or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 51 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:03 P.M., until Wednesday, 
April 16, 1997 at 7:00 P. M. at the Gymnasium, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16. 1997 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 290 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:04 P.M. 

A motion was made and seconded to accept M.G.L. c. 39, Sec. 15, as amended by the Acts of 1996 
to allow the moderator to declare a 2/3 vote. 

The motion was accepted by a Majority vote. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit two (2) non-voters to the meeting and to escort non- 
voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen 
to petition the General Court for special legislation to exempt the position of Chief of The Police 
Department from the provisions of Chapter Thirty-One of the General Laws as amended with the 
exception that the civil service status of any person holding the position of Chief of The Police 
Department on the effective date of the legislation shall not be impaired, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 52 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
146 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 16, 1997 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article IV, Section 6 of the General Bylaws 
as follows: 

Delete: "third Friday of January of each year" 

Add: "first Friday of February of each year" 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 53 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town of Andover 
in Article II, Paragraph 1 , "Annual Town Meeting Date; Special Town Meetings", by deleting the 
words "fourth Monday of March" in the second line of the first paragraph and replacing it with 
"fourth Tuesday in March", or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 54 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $600,000 for the 
purpose of acquiring a ladder/pumper truck for the Fire Department or take any other action related 
thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $600,000 be appropriated for 
the purpose of acquiring a ladder/pumper truck for the Fire Department, and that to raise this 
appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to 
borrow $600,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(9), of the General Laws, or any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN A 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $150,000 for 
architectural/engineering fees associated with the preparation of plans and designs for additions and 
renovations to the Public Safety Center or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $150,000 be appropriated for 
architectural/engineering fees associated with the preparation of plans and designs for additions 
and/or replacement and renovations to the Public Safety Center, including costs incidental and 
related thereto; and that to raise this appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $150,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
7(21) and (22), of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of 
the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Unanimous A 2/3 Vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

147 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 16, 1997 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to establish March 1 of each year as the last day to 
submit subjects for insertion by the Selectmen in the Annual Town Meeting Warrant. 

On petition of Margaret R. Cronin and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 57 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

An amendment was made to establish the first Friday in February for insertions by the Selectmen 
in the Annual Town Meeting Warrant. 

The amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 

The amended article was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 



ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by 
eminent domain, gift, purchase, or otherwise any fee, easement or other interest in land known as 
Colonial Drive as shown on a plan entitled "Colonial Hill at Andover" dated June 1985 prepared by 
Merrimack Engineering Services and recorded with the Essex North Registry of Deeds, Plan No. 
10062 and as constructed and to award no damages for said taking or payment for said acquisition 
and to appropriate and raise by taxation, transfer from available funds or borrowing or any 
combination thereof a sum of $38,000 for required engineering services, legal services, repairs and 
improvements to Colonial Drive and expenses incidental thereto, or take any action related thereto. 

On petition of Karen Schnorrenberg and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 58 as printed in the 
Warrant from available funds in the amount of $38,000 with the following words inserted: 
"Between the words "to" and "authorized" in the first line, insert: "accept and name as a public way 
Colonial Drive and to". 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 Vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by 
eminent domain, gift, purchase, otherwise any fee, easement or other interest in land known as 
Patriot Drive as shown on a plan entitled "Colonial Hill at Andover" dated June 1 985 prepared by 
Merrimack Engineering Services and recorded with the Essex North Registry of Deeds, Plan No 
10062 and as constructed and to award no damages for said taking or payment for said acquisition 
and to appropriate and raise by taxation, transfer from available funds or borrowing or any 
combination thereof a sum of $17,000 for required engineering services, legal services, repairs and 
improvements to Patriot Drive and expenses incidental thereto, or take any action related thereto. 

On petition of Karen Schnorrenberg and others 



148 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 16, 1997 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 59 as printed in the 
Warrant from available fund in the amount of $17,000 with the following words inserted: "Between 
the words "to" and "authorized" in the first line, insert: "accept and name as a public way Patriot 
Drive and to". 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 Vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will make required improvements to David Drive to meet Town 
standards; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire the necessary easements by purchase, 
by gift, or by seizure by right of eminent domain, or take other action related thereto. 

On petition of Joan Green and others 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will accept as a public way a street known as "David Drive" as 
shown on a plan entitled Pendleton Estates, prepared by Emmons, Fleming & Bienvenu, Inc. Dated 
August 1975, said plan being recorded in the North Essex Registry of Deeds as plan number 7863. 

On petition of Joan Green and others 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote an increased appropriation to the Merrimack Valley 
Regional Transit Authority (MVRTA) of $150,000 via taxation or transfer from available funds. 
The (MVRTA) provides handicap accessible transportation (lift-equipped) van services. This 
warrant would expand the time and area (to all of Andover) of existing Weebus service and 
Andover's financial participation with it. 

The Merrimack Valley Regional Transportation Authority (MVRTA) currently provides 
affordable lift-equipped van service (Weebus) to most of Andover. Weebus service terminates daily 
at 7:00 and Saturdays at 6:30. There is no Sunday Weebus service: Weebus service is not available 
and does not serve the entire town. 

The last commuter (daily) train arrives in Andover at 7:05. The Saturday late afternoon train 
arrives in Andover at 6:33. There is no transfer point between the MVRTA and Lowell Regional 
Transportation Authority (LRTA). People who need rides to and from work in the LRTA 
transportation region cannot do so without transferring between Weebus (Andover) and Roadrunner 
(Tewksbury). 

The MVRTA needs an increase of $150,000 to provide service to the entire town until 9:00 
every night including weekends. This will enhance the existing service so more disabled people can 
use it, especially to commute to/from work. 

On petition of Mike Warshawsky and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve a sum of $25,000 to 
be appropriated from available funds to provide expanded Weebus paratransit service for Andover's 
citizens or visitors who have disabilities or who are over 60 years by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



149 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 16. 1997 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section VI. U. of the Zoning By-law by adding 
the following sentence at the beginning of the regulation: 

U. "It is the purpose and intent of this by-law to address and mitigate the secondary effects of the 
adult uses referenced herein, which included increased crime, adverse impacts on the public health, 
safety and welfare, decreased property values, and neighborhood blight, all of those secondary 
effects having been clearly confirmed in numerous nationwide studies, in addition to reports given 
by public safety officials, all of which have been relied upon in considering the enactment of this by- 
law." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 63 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 vote required 



Board of Selectman Report: Approval 
Finance Committee Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section II. of the Zoning By-law by deleting 
subsection 25. and inserting the following: 

"25. COMMUNICATION STRUCTURE: A tower, antenna, dish, or other apparatus used for the 
reception and/or transmission of electronic signals for commercial and/or amateur communication 
purposes." 

and to amend Section VI.N. of the Zoning By-law by striking the first sentence thereof, and inserting 
the following: 

"N. The Board of Appeals may issue a special permit for a communication structure as defined in 
Section 11.25. of the Zoning By-law in districts where allowed by Section IV.B.50. of the Zoning By- 
law, provided, however, that dish antennae 24 inches or smaller in diameter shall not be subject to 
this by-law, and provided that the following are complied with:" 

and to amend Section IV.B.50. of the Zoning By-law by adding a new subsection (c) as follows: 

SRA SRB SRC APT LS OP GB MU IG IA ID 
"(c) Tower or antenna for commercial BA BA BA N BA N N N N BA BA 

communications purposes" 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 64 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

An amendment was moved and seconded to amend new subsection of Section IV (c) of Section 
IVB.50 of the Article as follows: Under SRA, SRB and SRC delete: BA, BA, and BA and substitute 
N, N, N. 
The amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 

A second motion was moved and seconded to amend Section 25. N. By deleting the words "dish 
antenna 24 inches or smaller" and replacing it with " dish antenna 39 inches or smaller". 



150 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 16, 1997 

The second amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 

Article 64 was approved as amended. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 vote required. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 65. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section II.10A of the Zoning By-law by 
deleting the words "At least ninety percent (90%)" and replacing with the words "One hundred 
percent (100%)" so that the second sentence of that section reads: 

"One hundred percent (100%) of the lot area required for zoning compliance shall be contiguous 
land other than land located within a line identified as the wetland margin as shown on maps entitled 
"Wetland Areas of Andover, MA" and subsequent revisions as approved by the Andover 
Conservation Commission. The ninety percent (90%) contiguous upland regulation shall continue 
to apply to a lot in existence prior to the effective date of this by-law." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

A motion was made and duly seconded to approve Article 65 as printed in the Warrant. 

A motion was made and seconded to amend the article to state that Article 65 should apply to cluster 
developments only. 

The amendment lost by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: YES: 173 NO: 41 A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 66. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section V.A., Table of Dimensional 
Requirements of the Zoning By-law as follows: 



District 


Minimum Yard Depth 




Side 




(Feet) 


Single Residence 




B 


Replace 15 with 25**** 


C 


Replace 15 with 30**** 



Note: 

**** The minimum yard depth of 15 feet shall continue to apply to dwelling units which are 
exempt by virtue of the provisions of M.G.L. c. 40A, s. 6, and to the enlargement, restoration 
or re-construction of a dwelling in existence as of the effective date of this by-law. The 
minimum yard depth requirement for a cluster development under Section VI.D.l.e. of this 
by-law may be reduced by the Planning Board to 20 feet. 

and to add the following subsection to VI.D. of the by-law: 

"VI.D.l.e. In consideration of a special permit for a cluster development under Section VI.D.2. of 
this by-law, the Planning Board may approve a reduction in the minimum side yard depth to 20 
feet." 



151 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 16, 1997 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 66 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 67. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section V.B. of the Zoning By-law by adding 
the following new subsection: 

"12. Lot/Slope Requirements in the Single Residence Districts: In the single residence zoning 
districts (SRA, SRB and SRC), the following provisions of this subsection V.B. 12 shall apply: 

a. The purposes of this subsection shall be: (I) to preserve and enhance landscape amenities by 
encouraging the maximum retention of natural topographic features, such as drainage swales, 
streams, slopes, ridge lines, rock outcroppings, vistas, natural plant formations, and trees; (ii) to 
minimize the effects of grading to insure that the natural character of steep slopes is retained; (iii) 
to minimize water-runoff and soil-erosion problems incurred in grading of steep slopes; and (iv) to 
encourage innovative architectural, landscaping, circulation and site design. For the purposes of this 
subsection, the term "natural slope" shall be defined as the elevation of the ground surface in its 
natural state, before man-made alterations such as grading, excavation, or filling. 

b. The provisions of this subsection 12 shall not apply to building lots in a definitive subdivision 
plan submitted in accordance with M.G.L. c. 41 in order to obtain the protections afforded by M.G.L. 

c. 40A, s. 6. In addition, the provisions of this subsection 12 shall not apply to building lots in a 
definitive subdivision plan approved prior to the enactment of the subsection 12. The provisions of 
this subsection 12 shall not apply to building lots on a plan subject to M.G.L. c. 41, s. 81P approved 
prior to the first date of publication of notice of this by-law. 

c. The slope of land at any point, stated as a percentage, shall be defined as the change in elevation 
over a horizontal distance measured perpendicular to the contours divided by the distance over which 
the change occurs multiplied by 100. 

Slope = (Change in elevation/Horizontal distance measured perpendicular to contours) x 100 

d. All natural slopes exceeding 35 percent over a horizontal distance of 10 feet as measured 
perpendicular to the contour on a building lot are protected and shall remain in their natural state. 

e. All areas with natural slopes exceeding 25 percent over a horizontal distance of 30 feet as 
measured perpendicular to the contour shall be excluded from the calculation of the minimum lot 
area required for the applicable zoning district. 

f. The Planning Board may grant a special permit from the provisions of this subsection VLB. 12, 
of in the Board's opinion, the proposal satisfies the purposes of subsection a. above." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 67 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: DECLARED IN EXCESS OF 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



152 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 16, 1997 

ARTICLE 68. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII of the Town 
Bylaws, as follows: 

(1) By adding to Section VI, Other Requirements, a new subsection V as follows: 

V. Alternative modes of transportation: 

Objectives: To ensure public safety by reducing the interaction of pedestrians, bicyclists, runners 
and recreational users with automotive traffic; to reduce reliance on autos for in-town travel; to 
reduce the impact of heavy traffic volumes on local roads; to encourage safe, healthful and self- 
reliant means of transportation; to encourage linkages between neighborhoods. 

To achieve these objectives, it is the goal of the Town to promote, whenever possible in the 
development process, provision for pedestrian and bicycle paths connecting residential housing, 
adjacent neighborhoods, school, recreational sites, open space, downtown services, places of work 
or any other connections which will provide safe, efficient, alternative ways of transportation and 
encourage a greater sense of community. 

(2) By amending Section VI D, Cluster development, Paragraph 2 d. By replacing the words 
"pedestrian" with the words "pedestrian/bicycle" and, in the last sentence, after the words "open 
spaces", adding the words "and neighborhoods" so that d. would now read: 

d. The Board may require the provision or reservation of pedestrian/bicycle access ways of suitable 
width and in locations suitable for pedestrian/bicycle movement of different types connecting open 
space areas within the cluster subdivision or to other adjacent open spaces and neighborhoods. 

(3) By amending Section VI Q, Site plan review, Paragraph 4 a. 16 as follows: 

after the words "open space", add the words "wherever possible, provision for pedestrian/bicycle 
access ways connecting to adjacent open space, neighborhoods, school, recreation areas, or 
transportation facilities and for alternative transit programs" so that 16 would now read: 

16. All areas designated as easements, conservation restriction areas or open space; wherever 
possible, provision for pedestrian/bicycle access ways connecting to adjacent open space, 
neighborhoods, schools, recreation areas, or transportation facilities and for alternative transit 
programs. 

(4) By amending Section VI Q Paragraph 5 c by adding a new #10 as follows: 

"10. Provision for pedestrian/bicycle access ways connecting to adjacent open space, 
neighborhoods, schools, recreation areas, or transportation facilities and for alternative transit 
programs." 

On petition of Madhu Sridhar and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 68 was Approved as printed in the Warrant with the 
following change: 

The new subsection under Section VI was changed from "V" to "W" 

"W. Alternative modes of transportation:" 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



153 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 16, 1997 

ARTICLE 69. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by 
eminent domain, gift, purchase, or otherwise any fee, easement or other interest, including drainage 
easements benefitting Samos Lane, in land known as Samos Lane as shown on a plan entitled, 
"Subdivision and Acceptance Plan, Samos Lane, Andover, MA. Chongris Bros. Owner, Scale: 1" 
= 40', April 6, 1 970, Charles E. Cyr, Civil Engineer, Lawrence, Massachusetts, recorded at the Essex 
North Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 6290 and as constructed and to award no damages for said 
taking or payment for said acquisition, or take any action related thereto. 

On petition of Linda A. O'Connell, Esq. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 69 as printed in the 
Warrant by a unanimous vote declared by the Moderator. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 70. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section VI, Subsection E of the Andover 
Zoning By-laws as follows: 

Changes to Heading of Subsection E. 

Change: "Removal of material:" 

To: "Importing, exporting or regrading of earth materials:" 

Changes to Paragraph E.l. 

Line 1 

Change: "No person shall remove any soil, except from land in public use," 

To: "Except on land in public use, no person shall import, export or regrade any earth 

materials" 

Line 2 

Change: "The removal" 

To: "The importing, exporting" 

Amended Paragraph E.l. 

1 . Except on land in public use, no person shall import, export or regrade any earth materials 
for purposes not in conformity with the intent and purpose of this bylaw. The importing, 
exporting or regrading of earth materials shall be in accordance with one (1) of the following 
procedures: 

Changes to Heading E.l.l 

Change: "General permit:" 

To: "General permit for sand and gravel pits:" 

Changes to Heading E.l. 2 
Change: "Removal" 

To: "Importing, exporting," 

Amended Heading E.l. 2 

1 .2. Importing, exporting or regrading of earth materials incidental to subdivision development 
or construction: 



154 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



APRIL 16, 1997 



Changes to Paragraph E. 1 .2a. 

Delete existing paragraph and replace by: 

a. The Planning Board may grant a special permit for the importing or exporting of earth 

materials in connection with the preparation of the site for a subdivision and the roadways 
therein. A special permit shall not be required for the importing or exporting of less than 
three hundred (300) cubic yards of material. 

Changes to Paragraph E. 1 .2c. 



Line 1 

Change: 

To: 



'removal or regrading" 

"The importing, exporting or regrading of earth materials' 



Line 7 

Change: 

To: 



'Section V" 
'Section VI' 



Amend Paragraph E.1.2c. 

c. The Planning Board may approve a special permit for importing, exporting or regrading of 

earth materials only if it determines that the subdivision plan as a whole makes the best 
feasible use of existing topography. In granting any special permit under Section VI, 
Subsection E, Paragraph 1.2a or b above, the Planning Board shall impose and set forth in 
the permit such other restrictions and conditions as it deems reasonable and in the public 
interest, including but not limited to the conditions set forth in Section VI, Subsection E, 
Paragraph 1.1c above. 

Changes to Paragraph E.1.2d. 



Line 1 

Change: 

To: 



"Where earth materials are to be removed" 

"Where less than five hundred (500) cubic yards of earth materials are to be imported 

or exported" 



Line 2 

Change: 

To: 



"site" 
"lot" 



Line 2 

Change: 

To: 



'removal" 

'importing or exporting" 



Lines 3, 5, 8 

Change: "Removal' 



To: 



'Importing or exporting" 



Line 5 

Change: 

To: 

Line 6 

Change: 

To: 

Line 8 

Change: 

To: 



'from areas where removal" 

'areas where importing or exporting of earth materials" 



'Regrading" 

'Regrading of less than three hundred (300) cubic yards" 



'system is" 

'system on a specific lot is" 



155 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
Amended Paragraph E.1.2.d. 



APRIL 16, 1997 



D. Where less than five hundred (500) cubic yards of earth material is to be imported or 
exported in connection with the preparation of a specific lot for building, the importing or 
exporting may take place only after the issuance of a building permit by the Building 
Inspector. Importing or exporting will normally be only from the area of the building, the 
driveways, the parking areas and areas where importing or exporting of earth materials is 
specifically required by the Board of Health in connection with the disposal systems. 
Regrading of less than three hundred (300) cubic yards of earth material which is necessary 
and incidental to the construction of a building, driveway, parking area or sewage disposal 
system on a specific lot is permitted. Additionally importing or exporting is subject to the 
provisions of Section VI, Subsection E, Paragraph 1.3 below; additional regrading is subject 
to the provisions of Section VI, Subsection E, Paragraph 1.4 below. 

Changes to Paragraph E.1.3 

Line 1 (two cases), 3, 4, 4, 6, 8, 17, 22 

Change: "removal" 

To: "importing or exporting" 

Line 1, 2, 8, 12, 17 

Change: "soil" 

To: "earth materials" 



Line 7 

Change: 

To: 

Line 10 
Change: 
To: 

Line 13 
Change: 
To: 



'general site" 
'specific lot" 



"soil removal" 
"earth moving' 



"removed, the purpose of the removal and location of the site of removal." 
"imported or exported, the purpose for which the material is to be imported or 
exported and the location of the site to or from which the importing or exporting will 
be done." 



Line 14 




Change: 


"excavation" 


To: 


"excavation or filling' 


Line 18 




After. 


"cubic yards" 


Insert: 


"on any lot" 


Line 19 




Change: 


"up to two . . . design 


To: 


"a permit for a larger a 



designated representatives." 
"a permit for a larger amount may be issued by the Board of Selectmen after a public 
hearing, at which time all interested persons shall be given the opportunity to be 
heard. At least fourteen (14) days' notice of the time and place of such hearing shall, 
at the expense of the applicant for a permit, be published in a newspaper of general 
circulation in the town." 



Line 25 

Delete non sentence: "Where the . . . or swale." 

Replace by: "In no case shall earth be moved in a manner such as to change the direction 

of a water course or to cause water to gather as in a sump or swale." 



156 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 16. 1997 

Line 28 

Delete last sentence: "Pits for . . . reasons." 

Amended Paragraph E.1.3. 

1.3. Miscellaneous importing or exporting of earth materials incidental to improvements: Importing 
or exporting of miscellaneous amounts of earth material not covered under the provisions of Section 
VI, Subsection E, Paragraph 1.1 or 1.2 above is permitted, provided that the importing or exporting 
is concomitant with the improvement of the property from which the importing or exporting takes 
place and provided that the importing or exporting is in accord with the expressed intent and purpose 
of the provisions of this bylaw. Importing or exporting of aggregate quantities of less than fifty (50) 
cubic yards from any one (1) specific lot requires no formal permit. Where the importing or 
exporting of quantities in excess of fifty (50) cubic yards but less than five hundred (500) cubic yards 
is desired, application must be made to the Building Inspector for a miscellaneous earth moving 
permit. If appropriate, the Building Inspector, with the concurrence of the Town Engineer, may 
issue the permit. The permit, if issued, shall indicate the approximate quantity of material to be 
imported or exported, the purpose for which the material is to be imported or exported, and the 
location of the site on which the importing or exporting will be done. The permit shall also specify 
that upon completion of any excavation or filling, exposed subsoil shall also be graded and covered 
with loam to a minimum depth of six (6) inches and that failure to do so shall be deemed a violation 
of the bylaw. Where special circumstances exist which indicate the importing or exporting of earth 
materials in excess of five hundred (500) cubic yards on any lot, but for which a general permit 
under Section VI, Subsection E, Paragraph 1.1 above, is not appropriate, a permit for a larger amount 
may be issued by the Board of Selectmen after a public hearing, at which time all interested persons 
shall be given the opportunity to be heard. At least fourteen (14) days' notice of the time and place 
of such hearing shall, at the expense of the applicant for a permit, be published in a newspaper of 
general circulation in the town. Except where exporting under this Section VI, Subsection E, 
Paragraph 1.3, is done in connection with the formation or enlargement of a pond, excavation shall 
not be permitted below the mean grade of the street or road serving the property. In no case shall 
earth be moved in a manner such as to change the direction of a water course or to cause water to 
gather as in a sump or swale. 

On petition of James C. Keck and others 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 71. To petition to the Town Meeting to accept as a public way Heritage Lane as shown 
on a plan entitled "Definitive Plan of Heritage Estates, Andover, Mass., Owner: Sidney P. White; 
Developer - Andover Building & Development Corp.; Engineer - Nysten Engineering & Associates, 
Andover, Mass.; dated March 23, 1981, revised April 23, 1981; Scale 1" = 40', recorded in the Essex 
North District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 8635. 

On petition of Andover Building & Development Corporation and others 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 72. To petition to the Town Meeting to accept as a public way Newman Hill Drive as 
shown on a Plan entitled "Plan of Land Located in Andover, Mass. Prepared for Andover Building 
and Development Corporation, October 3, 1989, revised October 31, 1989, Scale 1" = 40', prepared 
by Cyr Engineering Services, Inc., and recorded at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as 
Plan No. 11682. 

On petition of Andover Building & Development Corporation and others 



157 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 16, 1997 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 72 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 73. To determine if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way Possum 
Hollow Road as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board entitled, "Clover 
Estates" and recorded with the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as plan number 1 1083 A dated 
October 1, 1987. 

On petition of John Garabedian and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approved Article 73 as printed in the 
Warrant with the deletion of "Clover Estates" and inserting "Clover Field Estates" by a Majority 
vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 74. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way Stone Post Road as shown 
on a plan entitled "Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Stone Post Farm' Andover, MA, Scale 1" = 40', 
dated: September 9, 1992, DanaF. Perkins, Inc., Consulting Engineers & Surveyors, owner: William 
A. And Priscilla A. Watson", which is recorded at Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 12190. 

On petition of Linda A. O'Connell, Esq. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 74 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 75. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way Harmony Lane, as shown 
on a plan entitled "Definitive Subdivision Plan, Harmony Lane, Andover, Mass., Scale: 1 " = 40', 
date: April 11, 1995, Owner & Applicant: The Estate of Blanche Shtrumpfman, c/o Thomas 
Horrigan, 7747 Rollingridge Court, Orlando, FL 32835, Surveyor: Andover Consultants, Inc., 1 
East River Place, Methuen, Mass. 01844" which is recorded at Essex North District Registry of 
Deeds as Plan No. 12628. 

On petition of K & D Realty Trust and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 75 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 76. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way Scotland Drive as 
shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board and entitled, "Definitive Subdivision Plan 
of Land Andover Country Club Section III Andover, Massachusetts Scale: 1" = 40' Date: November 
20, 1992 ""Revised April 6, 1993 Dana F. Perkins, Inc. Consulting Engineers and Land Surveyors 
1215 Main Street Unit 1 1 1 Tewksbury, MA 01876 125 Main Street Reading, MA 01867 Owner: 
CA Investment Trust 59 Chandler Circle Andover, Massachusetts", which plan is recorded with 
Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12254. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan, Esq. and others 
158 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 16. 1997 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 76 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 



Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 77. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Acorn Drive, as 
shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board and entitled, "Definitive Subdivision Plan 
'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale: 1" = 100' Date: January 15, 1991 Owner & Applicant 
Wyncrest Development Corp., 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass. Surveyor Andover Consultants, 
Inc., 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry 
of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Yvon Cormier Construction Corporation and others 



WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 78. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Hazelwood Circle, 
as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board and entitled, "Definitive Subdivision 
Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale 1" = 100' Date: January 15, 1991 Owner & 
Applicant Wyncrest Development Corp. 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass. Surveyor Andover 
Consultants, Inc., 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which plan is recorded with the Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Yvon Cormier Construction Corporation and others 



WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 79. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Basswood Lane, 
as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board and entitled, "Definitive Subdivision 
Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale: 1" = 100' Date: January 15, 1991 Owner & 
Applicant Wyncrest Development, 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass. Surveyor Andover 
Consultants, Inc., 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which plan is recorded with Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 



On petition of Yvon Cormier Construction Corporation and others 



WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 80. To see if the Town will vote to accept Fumari, formerly known as Cypress Lane, as 
a public way shown on plan entitled "Cypress Lane Extension" recorded as Plan #1 1873. 

On petition of Andrew A. Caffrey, Jr. and others 



159 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 16. 1997 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to accept and name Fumari 
Farm Lane, formally known as Cypress Lane, as a public way as shown on a plan entitled "Cypress 
Lane Extension", which plan is recorded at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan 
#11873. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority 
vote to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting at 10:03 P.M. 

A true record 

ATTEST 

Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



160 







umiw*^ 



DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 





AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1997 








ELECTED 






BOARD OF SELECTMEN 






SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Gerald H. Silverman, Ch. 


-1998 




Tina B. Girdwood, Ch. 


-1998 


Larry L. Larsen 


-2000 




David A. Birabach 


-1998 


William T. Downs 


-1999 




Eric J. Nadworny 


-1999 


Brian P. Major 


-2000 




Frank Eccles 


-2000 


John P. Hess 


-1998 




Timothy M. McCarron 


-2000 


ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 




REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


Ronald C. Hajj, Ch. 


-2001 




Leo J. Lamontagne, Ch., Lawr. 


-1999 


Jason V. Fox 


-2000 




Joseph M. Gleason, Andover 


-2000 


Norma Villareal 


-1998 




Thomas L. Grondine, Methuen 


-1999 


James A. Cuticchia 


-1999 




Michael E. Condon, Methuen 


-1999 


Hartley M. Burnham* 


-2001 




Evelyn A. Burke, Lawrence 


-1999 


* Appointed by Commissioner 






Sean Neilon, Lawrence 


-1999 


of Dept. of Comm. Affairs 






John J. Caffrey, No. Andover 


-1999 


TOWN MODERATOR 






TRUSTEES. CORNELL FUND 



James D. Doherty 



1998 



John H. Caswell -1998 

Edwin F. Reidel -1999 

Virginia H. Cole - 2000 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

Earl G. Efinger - 2000 

Joan M. Lewis - 2000 

John R. Petty - 2000 

Donna C. Ellsworth - 2000 

Dr. Eric Stubenhaus - 1998 
Reverend Calvin F. Mutti 
Reverend James M. Diamond 
Reverend Joseph W. LaDu 



161 







APPOINTED 




TOWN MANAGER 


- REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 




FINANCE COMMITTEE 




ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 




Donald F. Schroeder, Ch. 


-2000 


Daniel S. Casper, Ch. 


-2000 


Margaret I. Jurgen 


-1999 


Paul Bevacqua 


-1998 


Donald W.Robb 


-1999 


Carol C. McDonough 


-1998 


Joanne F. Marden 


-2000 


Peter F. Reilly 


-1999 


Peter J. Volpe 


-1999 


Pamela H. Mitchell 


-1999 


Anthony J. Sakowich 


-1998 


Associate Members: 




Thomas E. Fardy 


-1998 


David W. Brown 


-1999 


Richard D. Fox 


-2000 


Alan R. Shulman 


-2000 


Cynthia Milne 


-1998 


Stephen D. Anderson 


-1998 






Lois Karfunkel 


-2000 


PLANNING BOARD 




CONSERVATION COMMISSION 




Michael H. Miller, Ch. 


-2001 


Robert A. Pustell, Ch. 


-2000 


Paul J. Salafia 


-2002 


Donald D. Cooper 


-1999 


Vincent A. Chiozzi, Jr. 


-1998 


Paul J. Finger 


-1998 


Susan A. Alovisetti 


-2000 


Walter Bird, UI 


-1998 


Linn N. Anderson 


-1999 


Gail L. Ralston 


-2000 


Associate Member: 




Joyce J. Robinson 


-1999 


Robert G. Goodwin 


-2001 


Mark R. DeLisio 


-2000 


TRUSTEES. MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY PRESERVATION COMMISSION 




Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-1999 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2000 


Patricia H. Edmonds 


-2000 


Ann E. Constantine 


-1999 


Martin Klein 


-1998 


Norma A. Gammon 


-1999 


Thomas J. Swift 


-1998 


James S. Batchelder 


-2000 


Laurence J. Lamagna 


-2000 


Dennis Ingram 


-1998 


Ruth M. Dunbar 


-1999 


Raymond H. Flynn 


-1998 


Maria A. Rizzo 


-2000 


John S. Sullivan - Emeritus 




BOARD OF HEALTH 




BOARD OF ASSESSORS 




Dr. Douglas Dunbar, Ch. 


-2000 


William Krajeski 


-1998 


Frederick M. Childs 


-1998 


Archibald D. Maclaren 


-2000 


Dr. Daniel E. Coleman 


-1999 


John R. Petty 


-1999 


DESIGN ADVISORY GROUP 


TOWLEFUND 




Ann E. Constantine 


-1998 


Phillip F. Sullivan 


-1999 


Susan W. Alovisetti 


-1998 


Ruth E. Westcott 


-2000 


Donald J. Harding 


-1999 


Marilyn R. Brody 


-1998 


BOARD OF REGISTRARS 




GR. LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 


Joanne D. Dee 


-2000 


Robert E. McQuade 


-1998 


Carolyn Simko 


-1999 






Wendell A. Mattheson 


-1998 







162 



CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

John R. Dempsey. Ch. - 1999 

Annetta R. Freedman - 2000 

Barbara Worcester - 2000 

James M. Lyman - 1999 



ANDOVER CULTURAL COUNCIL 

JohnZipeto,Ch. -1999 

Marcelle Gregg - 1999 

Mark E. Efinger -1998 

Sharon R. Mason - 1998 

Anne M. Sullivan - 1998 

Gail L. Ralston - 1998 

Selma P. Flieder -1998 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 



RETIREMENT BOARD 

William T. Downs, Ch. 
James A. Cuticchia 
John C. Doherty 
James L. Edholm 
Rodney P. Smith 



-1998 
-1999 
-1999 
-2000 
Open 



PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 

John C. Doherty, Ch. - 1998 

John A. Campbell -1998 

John J. Lewis - 1998 

Harold W.Wright -1998 

Calvin A. Deyermond - 1998 

Edward J. Morrissey - 1998 

Edward Cole - 1998 

Susan W.Ratya -1998 

James M. Deyermond - 1998 

COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 



James M. Marsh, Ch. 


-2000 


Mark Walker 


-1998 


Marjorie E. Dennis 


-1998 


Michael Warshawsky 


-1998 


Gilbert E. Martin, Jr. 


-1998 


Gina B. LaFortune 


-1998 


Susan E. Jenkins 


-1999 


Paul A. Clinton 


-2000 


Edward A. Kelley 


-1999 


Neil R. Gordon 


-2000 


Alan J. Champagne 


-2000 


Timothy J. McCarron 


-1999 


Timothy McCarron* 


-2000 


Yoang Hoon Jung 


-1999 


School Comm. Rep. 




Mark E. Van Doren 


-1999 


OPEN SPACE & OUTDOOR REC. PLAN COMM. 


COUNCIL ON AGING 

Martin Epstein, Ch. 




Walter Bird, III, Ch. 


-1997 


-1999 


Gail L. Ralston 


-1997 


Dorothy L. Bresnahan 


-1999 


Alan F. French 


-1997 


Oscar Rosenberg 


-2000 


Steven Golden 


-1997 


Paul J. Salafia 


-2000 


Brendan J. Dugan 


-1997 


Paul L. Twomey 


-1999 


Mark R. DeLisio 


-1997 


Dr. Robert J. Schreiber 


-1998 


Mark Walker 


-1997 


Arthur W. Smith 


-2000 


Susan W. Alovisetti 


-1997 


Deborah Silberstein 


-1998 


Arthur W. Smith 


-1997 


Elizabeth Tice 


-1998 


William S. MacLeod 


-1997 


Marlies Zammuto 


-1998 


Virginia H. Cole 


-1997 


Leo Doherty 


-2000 


John D. Fitzpatrick 


-1997 


Doreen Correnti 


-2000 


Thomas F. Russell 


-1997 


ZeffMarisich 


-2000 


Ronald R. Hill 


-1997 


Maureen Jandovitz 


-1998 


Peggy Keck 


-1997 






Dr. Douglas M. Dunbar 


-1997 






INDUSTRIAL DEV. FINANCING AUTHORITY 


DEVELOPMENT & INDUSTRIAL COMM. 



Michael W. Morris - 2000 

Dr. Thomas J. Swift - 2000 

JohnE. Shuman -1998 

Charles H. Wesson, Jr. - 1998 

163 



Dr. Thomas J. Swift - 2000 

S. Joseph Hoffinan - 2000 



BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMM. SHAWSHEEN VILLAGE HISTORIC 

DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Raymond H. Flynn, Ch. - 2000 

James R. Sellers - 2000 

Wendy T. Callery - 2000 

Robert A. Bramhall -1999 

Leslie A. Frost - 1999 

Jude A. Curtis -1998 

Christine E. Bobek -1998 



ZONING BYLAW TASK FORCE 

Daniel S. Casper - 1997 

Carol C. McDonough - 1997 

Stephen D. Anderson - 1997 

Michael H. Miller -1997 

Paul J. Finger - 1997 

Steven L. Burdeau -1997 

MERR. VALLEY PLANNING COMM. 

Stephen L. Colyer - 1998 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY TRUSTEES 

John W. Crow -1998 

Robert S. Hamilton - 1998 

Arthur H. Richter -2000 

COMMUNITY ACTION COUNCIL REP. 

Robert Minasian 



Dennis Ingram, Ch. 


-1998 


Diane R. Derby 


- 1999 


Ron Abraham 


-2000 


Kevin Byrne 


-2000 


Sherron Heller 


-1998 


Perry M. Raffi 


-1999 


Christian Huntress* 


-2000 


Bruce Taylor* 


-2000 


*Alternate Members 




SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 


Kathleen M. Hess 


-2000 


Win Ryan 


-2000 


Madhu Sridhar 


-2000 


Cynthia Milne 


-2000 


Sheila Doherty 


-2000 


Ruby Easton 


-2000 


David Reilly 


-2000 


Stephanie Smith 


-2000 


Rosalie Konjoian 


-2000 


YOUTH COUNCIL 




Kathleen M. Hess 


-1999 


Colleen Georgian 


-1999 


Richard K. Yost 


-1999 


NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMM. REP. 



Robert E. McQuade - 1998 



164 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 



Animal Inspector 

Civil Defense Director 

Community Development & Planning Department 
Director of Health 
Director of Planning 
Conservation Administrator 
Inspector of Buildings 
Electrical Inspector 
Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector 

Director of Elder Services 

Finance and Budget Department 
Finance Director 
Chief Assessor 
Collector/Treasurer 
Information Systems Manager 
Purchasing Agent/Insurance Coordinator 
Veterans Service Agent 

Fire Chief 

Housing Authority Executive Director 

Human Resources Director 

Plant and Facilities Department 
Director 

Superintendent of Building Maintenance 
Superintendent of Parks and Grounds 
Superintendent of Plumbing, Heating and Electrical 

Police Chief 

Operations Commander 
Detective Division Commander 

Public Works Department 
Director 

Highway Superintendent 
Town Engineer 

Memorial Hall Library Director 

Superintendent of Schools 

Town Accountant 

Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager 



Richard D. Lindsay, D.V.M. 
James F. Johnson 

Everett F. Penney 

Stephen L. Colyer 

James A. Greer 

Kaija M. Gilmore 

Richard J. Salenas 

Bruce P. Hale 

Jeanne M. Madden 

Anthony J. Torrisi 

William J. Krajeski 

David J. Reilly 

Barbara D. Morache 

Elaine M. Shola 

John J. Lewis 

Harold J. Wright 

Christine L. Metzemaekers 

Candace Hall 

Joseph R. Piantedosi 
Kenneth H. Parker 
James L. Bamford 
Stephen J. George 

James F. Johnson 
Lt. Phillip E. Froburg 
Lt. John P. Houlihan 



Robert E. McQuade 
John F. Canavan, Jr. 
Brian W. Moore 

James E. Sutton 

Richard E. Neal 

Rodney P. Smith 

Randall L. Hanson 

Thomas J. Urbelis 

Reginald S. Stapczynski 



165 



***************** 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 

***************** 

Mailing Address; 

Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 

Business Hours at the Town Offices: 

8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. Monday - Friday 
(Building Division - 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.) 



Telephone Numbers; 

POLICE/FIRE - EMERGENCY 91 1 

Fire Department - Business 623-8466 

Police Department - Business 475-041 1 

Animal Control Officer 475-04 1 1 

Town Offices Switchboard 623-8200 

Fax Number 623-8221 

DCS Classes & Activities 623-8273/8274 

Department of Public Works 623-8350 

Memorial Hall Library 623-8400 

Senior Center 623-8321 

Superintendent of Schools 623-850 1 

Human Resources Office 623-8530 



Andover's Home Page: http://www.town.andover.ma.us 
Memorial Hall Library's Home Page: www.mhl.org 
Andover's Population: 31,047 Square Miles: 32 



Number of Acres: 19,900 

1,600 (7.5%) controlled by Conservation Commission 
1,000 (5%) owned by A.V.I.S. 
889 (4.5%) owned by Commonwealth - Harold Parker State Forest 



166 



Town Meeting and Election: 



Town Election is held the fourth Tuesday of March. Andover 
has an Open Town Meeting which is generally held four 
weeks following the Town Election. 



Voter Registration Information; Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 



Where To Inquire About or Obtain Licenses & Permits: 

Ballfield Permits & Rentals 



Birth Certificate 

Building Permits 

(construction, plumbing, gas, electric) 

Business Certificate 

Death Certificate 

Dog License 

Fishing & Hunting License 

Food Service License 

Liquor License 
Marriage License 
Open Air Burning Permit 
Smoke Detector Permit 
Street Opening Permit 
Town House Rental 

Zoning By-law Variance 



Facilities Coordinator 623-8450 
at Town House 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Building Division 623-8301 
(Office Hours: 8:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.) 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Health Division 623-8295 or 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Fire Department 623-8466 

Fire Department 623-8466 

Dept. of Public Works 623-8350 

Facilities Coordinator 623-6450 
at Town House 

Building Division 623-8301 or 
Board of Appeals Off. 623-8315 



167 



Andover's Tax Rate: 



$15.82 - Residential and Open Space 

$22.90 - Commercial/Industrial & Personal Property 

$17.41 - Equalized Tax Rate 



When are Taxes Due: 



Taxes are due quarterly on the following dates: 
August 1st - November 1st - February 1st - May 1st 



Excise Tax Information: Call Assessor's Office at 623-8264 



Recycling: 



Curbside Pickup: Every other week - recyclables (glass - clear, green & brown - 
newspapers, magazines, and steel & tin cans - crush/flatten) will be 
collected on the same day as the trash collection. Place recycling bin 
curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pick up day. 

Recycling Information & Complaints: Call Waste Management, Inc. at 1-800-562-0321 

Recycling Site: 



Compost Site: 



Third Saturday of each month at West Middle School from 9:00 A.M. 
to 1:00 P.M. Plastics (#1 & #2) and aluminum materials. 

High Plain Road (Bald Hill area). Leaves and grass clippings. Open 
year round for walk-ins, drive-ins as announced in local newspapers. 



Rubbish Complaints or Inquiries: Vining Disposal at 1-800-432-9996 



Pothole or Snow Removal Complaints: 



Highway Division at 623-8426 or 
Dept. of Public Works at 623-8350 



How to Dispose of an Appliance: Appliances can no longer be left curbside with your trash - 

their disposal is the homeowner's responsibility. Suggestions 
for disposal: hire a private contractor or check with the 
company where your new appliance was purchased to see if 
they will take the old appliance. 



168 



HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 



United States Senators: 

The Honorable Edward M. Kennedy (D) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Boston, MA 02203 

(617)565-3170 

SR-3 15 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 205 10 

(202) 224-4543 

The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin Square, Boston, MA 021 14 

(617)565-8519 

SR-362 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

(202) 224-2742 

United States Representative; 

Honorable Martin T. Meehan (D) 

Fifth Congressional District 

11 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 01852 

(508)459-0101 

1216 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515 

(202)225-3411 

State Senator: 

John D. O'Brien, Jr. (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

237 Highland Road, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 4 1 6B, Boston, MA 02 1 33 

(617) 722-1612 

State Representatives: 

Barry R. Finegold (D) 

Seventeenth Essex District 

16 Balmoral Street, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 436, Boston, MA 02 1 33 

(617) 722-2575 



Edward A. LeLacheur (D) 

Eighteenth Middlesex District 

63 Fruit Street, Lowell, MA 01852 

State House, Room 146, Boston, MA 02133 

(617) 722-2582 



169 



WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 



The Board of Selectmen and Town Manager welcome your ideas and comments about our 
municipal services and policies, or any general comments you may have about the Town of Andover. 
Please let us know what you think on this survey and return it to: 

TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE 
TOWN OFFICES 
r 36 BARTLET STREET, ANDOVER, MA 01810 

Gerald H. Silverman Reginald S. Stapczynski " 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen Town Manager 




******** 



Tell us one thing that you really like that the Town does. 



Tell us one thing that you would like to see improved upon. 



Name and Address (Optional) 

170